February 2012

1
No. 281

Workshops in England!

Frank Love, | 1636 days ago

February 11 and February 25
Manchester and London

For all those Impossible loving UK people there is a full schedule of workshops planned for Manchester and London in 2012. These hands on workshops are a chance for you to dust off your Polaroid camera and start taking fantastic artistic pictures with the whole range of Impossible films.

Our UK Impossible expert Tom Wright will show you how to get the best out of vintage Polaroid cameras (don’t worry if you don’t have one, we will be able to lend you one, but please indicate this while booking)

Tom will cover topics ranging from shielding techniques and temperature control helping you to harness the film’s unique character.

The Manchester workshop takes place at Incognito, 5 Stevenson Square on Saturday 11th February at 3pm. Book a place here

The London workshop takes place at Rough Trade East, Brick Lane on Saturday 25th February at 11am. Book a place here

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No. 282

Announcing Instant Revolution @ The Impossible Project NYC Space!

Jon Campolo, | 1636 days ago

February 9 – March 23, 2012
6pm-9pm
The Impossible Project Space NYC
425 Broadway
5th Floor
New York NY 10013
Gary Baseman
  • James Franco
  • Maripol
  • Mary Ellen Mark
  • Jennifer Juniper Stratford

POLAROID and IMPOSSIBLE present
INSTANT REVOLUTION

To celebrate the collaboration between Polaroid and Impossible, The Impossible Project NYC Space will host a very special group exhibition dedicated to showcasing five of the world’s freshest contemporary photographers. For more than 60 years, the instant image has been a revolutionary aspect of how artists create, consider and define analog photography. The five artists featured in INSTANT REVOLUTION all take different approaches to illustrating their relationship with analog photography.

Featuring photos captured with the last original Polaroid Spectra film production run from 2008, one of the first products introduced as part of the Polaroid Classic line, five of the world’s most dynamic and contemporary artists have contributed to INSTANT REVOLUTION: Gary Baseman, James Franco, Maripol, Mary Ellen Mark and Jennifer Juniper Stratford. INSTANT REVOLUTION will be shown at The Impossible Project Space NYC from February 9 to March 23 2012 and on our official website. The Opening Reception will take place on February 9 from 6pm to 9pm, in the presence of the artists and with refreshments provided.

POLAROID and IMPOSSIBLE present
INSTANT REVOLUTION
at The Impossible Project Space NYC

February 9, 2012 – March 23, 2012

Opening Reception:
Thursday February 9, 2012. 6pm-9pm.

RSVP: rsvp@theimpossibleproject.com

Open to the public during open hours
Monday to Friday: 11am to 7pm
Saturday and Sunday: 12pm to 5pm

No. 283

Viewfinder: Brittany Hollis

Patrick Tobin | 1635 days ago

Hello again, Impossible friends! Our current entry turns our Viewfinder on NYC-based Brittany Hollis…

“My project is an ongoing one, there isn’t a set theme or thread running through it, just things that strike my interest and inspire me to snap a photo. I have a small but growing collection of Polaroid cameras, and I try to incorporate them into daily life as much as my digital camera. I’m really a pain to take pictures with, I normally go out with the digital, Polaroid, phone, and recently disposables as well.

I was born in the Midwest, raised on the East Coast, and travel constantly for work (I model). All the traveling gives me new places to go photo- and camera-hunting, which is great. My favorite place to take pictures though, is around my parents’ home in Berks County, Pa. Their house is surrounded by woods, horse farms, vineyards, and a small river – there’s always something interesting going on or some beautiful scene to capture.

I’ve always been very into instant photography, from the time my dad would snap pics of my sister and I as children, and then hand them to us so we could watch them develop. Back when I started modeling, the agents would take Polaroids of the girls to send out to clients, and casting directors would take snaps of models at castings as a reference to what we “really” look like. I got my first Polaroid camera in 2008 after goofing around in my NY agency’s office with my bookers — I was hooked!

The Impossible films I’ve used so far have been the PX 600 Silver Shade UV+ Black Frame, PX 680 Color Shade First Flush, and PX 600 Silver Shade UV+.”

To see more of Brittany’s ever-growing collection of images, please visit her blog at http://hollis-on-roids.tumblr.com/

No. 284

ACE Hotel Shares the Love!

Jon Campolo, | 1635 days ago

Image by By Niki

Continuing our collaboration with ACE Hotels through an exhibition in NYC and our Limited Edition PX 600 Silver Shade UV+ film, ACE has been hosting an online photo contest, selecting new winners every month! ACE is collecting submissions of everyday and exalted Impossible images at an ever-evolving gallery located at acehotel.com/impossible. ACE’s ad hoc panel of romantics and analog enthusiasts will then co-curate a physical gallery show at Ace Hotel New York next fall, comprised of selected shots from this growing community gallery.

Congratulations to the most recent selected photographers of the ACE contest!

December 2011:
Andrea Buia, Judith Kyvik, Gregory Bencivego, Frederik Holmér and Morgane Santamarianova – enjoy your Pink Martini’s Joy To The World holiday record!

January 2012:
Weronika Gajda aka By Niki – enjoy your limited PX Gold Edition Set from Impossible!

Peruse the winners of the past two months here, then check out the growing collection and pick your favorites or submit your own for a chance to win!

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No. 285

8 Exposures...with Jade Sheldon.

Patrick Tobin | 1635 days ago

Hello, Impossibles! Welcome back to 8 Exposures. This week, we spoke with Portland, OR-based photographer, illustrator and MAE student Jade Sheldon

1) Q: What kind of Polaroid camera(s) do you use?

A: I have a small collection of Polaroid cameras that my grandparents have given me over the years. They love estate sales and whenever they come across a camera, they can’t resist getting it for me (you won’t catch me complaining). Not all of them are in working order, but they are beautiful to look at nonetheless. The main cameras I use for my instant film photography are my Sun 660 and Fuji Instax 210. I’m looking to add a Polaroid 195 to my modest collection.

2) Q: Why do you like instant photography?

A: I earned my BFA in illustration in 2009. That was four long years of sketches, thumbnails, roughs, color comps, second-guessing, finals, and critiques. Creating an illustration can take hours… days… even months. There is so much planning and so much preparation that goes into it. When I discovered instant film, I felt so free. With instant film, I could create a piece of original art in seconds. I could uncover beauty in a scene that would otherwise be overlooked. I love the fact that you never know exactly what is going to appear on that piece of film. All of its quirks and imperfections make it that much more personal and lovely.

3) Q: What is your earliest memory of instant film?

A: In high school, I was looking through my mom’s piles of old photographs and came across a collection of polaroids of my family at various birthdays and holidays. My dad, sporting his long hair and sideburns and wearing his leather jacket and my mom, with her huge, permed hair and neon colored frocks. I remember thinking how beautiful it was that they had these happy little moments captured on film that they might have otherwise forgotten about. I knew I wanted to be able to capture moments of my life like that too.

4) Q: What’s your favorite Impossible Project film type?

A: I have recently fallen madly in love with PX 600 Silver Shade UV+. Completely, madly, deeply.

5) Q: What are your favorite subjects to photograph?

A: I don’t have a complicated answer to this question, I just simply love photographing my life: myself, my fiancé, people I meet, tree-lined trails I walk, an especially delicious breakfast I eat, an abandoned coffee cup I stumble across in a cafe. I look forward to the day when I’m a wrinkly old lady, muttering on about my youth to my grandchildren and showing them what life was like back in my day through my collection of photographs.

6) Q: Tell us about a project you’re working on.

A: One project that I’m really excited about is a portrait series I’m starting. I will be interviewing and photographing artists (photographers, illustrators, painters, musicians) living and working in the Pacific Northwest.

7) Q: Who are your favorite photographers, instant or otherwise?

A: Wow, this is an extremely loaded question because, honestly, there is so much talent out there that I admire, appreciate and look up to. A list of photographers whose blogs inspire me daily include Jamie Beck, Parker Fitzgerald, Sean Flanigan, Alica Gao, Nikole Herriott, Sarah Jane, Kim Miller, Sara Lynn Paige, Chris & Sarah Roads and Lisa Warninger.

8) Q: If you could take an photo of anyone or anything what would it be?

A: A few weeks ago I stumbled across Austin Gros’ photographs of the Austrian Alps and I have made it my mission to get there with my instant film camera(s) in tow.

Special thanks to Jade for taking part in 8 Exposures! To see more of her photography, please visit her Flickr Photo Stream and her Tumblr, Instant Haven

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No. 286

Avoiding the notorious undeveloped patch

Frank Love | 1633 days ago

PX 680 Color Shade FF as well as Silver Shade pictures may display a small undeveloped patch at the top of image area when used in folding type cameras (such as the SLR 680/ 690 and SX 70 cameras with an ND filter). Our engineers in the Netherlands are working hard to overcome this issue for future film generations. To avoid this undeveloped patch with our current materials you can apply this easy technique:

At the same time as pressing the shutter release button, slightly press down the film compartment flap of your camera as shown in the video. Do not apply excessive force, as this may damage your camera.

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No. 287

From the Artists of Instant Revolution

Jon Campolo, | 1631 days ago

This Thursday evening together with Polaroid, we are excited to host the opening of INSTANT REVOLUTION – the first in an upcoming series of artistic collaborations throughout 2012, celebrating the launch of the Polaroid Classic line.

For this unique exhibition, the artists provided us with feedback on their experiences using Polaroid cameras again with original Soft Tone Image film.

GARY BASEMAN
“I wanted to use the camera the way I originally used such a device in the 1970s and 80s…to capture an immediate memory. My art is about discovering one’s ‘True Self,’ and Polaroid cameras have been an important tool in assisting in this truthfinding and free expression.”

JAMES FRANCO
Polaroid images are true singular moments captured in time, they are so dependent on the conditions of the moment…and the look is unbeatable.”

MARIPOL
“When I got my Polaroid camera years ago, my curiosity turned into voyeurism, self-exhibitionism. Behind the camera box, hearing the click, seizing the moment, I got hooked on it.”

MARY ELLEN MARK
“I really enjoyed going out on the street again. Everyone seemed to love being photographed with this strange object that spat out a print right away and didn’t have a digital image on the back.”

JENNIFER JUNIPER STRATFORD
“I photographed the Hollywood that matters to me. From casting to continuity, everyone had a bit of a giggle and love for Polaroid photography, which made this project so significant to the history of Hollywood and its relationship with Polaroid.”

Congratulations to the artists for what is sure to be one of Impossible’s most exciting exhibitions yet!

INSTANT REVOLUTION
February 9, 2012 – March 23, 2012
Opening Reception, in presence of Gary Baseman, Maripol, Mary Ellen Mark and Jennifer Juniper Stratford on Thursday February 9, 2012, from 6pm-9pm with live music and refreshments provided.
Please RSVP at: rsvp@the-impossible-project.com

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No. 288

wasser atmen / breathing water

Frank Love, | 1630 days ago

We can’t resist but sharing this beautiful fanfold with you, created by photographer Susan Probst from the German artist collective zimmer 117. Her analog instant photography series “wasser atmen” (breathing water) introduces you to a magic world seen through an emerald green surface of water. A floating space like a second, drawn reality. Fleeting, fragile moments. Calm, almost pictorial pictures, reminding of dream sequences. The photographs create their own cosmos, an underwater world, where breathing stops and time stands still.

The double-page fanfold presents 20 instant images printed in a special gloss varnish that gives a tactile impression of the originals. Limited edition of 200 items, 89 × 107 mm, available for 10 Euro + Shipping costs here.

No. 289

The Camera Museum: Polaroid SLR 680

Patrick Tobin, | 1630 days ago

The Polaroid SLR 680 camera was first introduced in 1982, and was the only SLR ever produced for 600-series film*. It utilizes the same sonar autofocus technology as the 100-speed SX-70 Time Zero Autofocus models but also features a built-in electronic flash. The flash reflector even tilts to accommodate focal distance.

The SLR 680 sports a 4-element 116mm f/8 glass lens with a minimum focal length of 10.4 inches. It has an aperture range from f/8- f/22. Manual focus is possible via an override switch above the focusing wheel. The camera features a socket for a remote shutter release and also has a tripod socket and lugs for a neck strap.

The SLR 680 is compatible with any of the Impossible Project 600-series film, including PX 680 Color Shade First Flush film and PX 600 Silver Shade UV+ Black Frame film

For a full selection of film that will work in the SLR 680, please click HERE

To purchase an SLR 680 Camera kit, please click HERE

*The SLR 690 is identical to the 680 except for slight differences in the metering system. It is essentially the Japanese version of the SLR 680, so they are in the same family.

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No. 290

Instant Revolution backstage on vice

Frank Love | 1629 days ago

Jennifer Juniper Stratford is one of the five photographers who were shooting Polaroid Classic Image Film for the Instant Revolution exhibition, opening tomorrow night at 6pm at The Impossible Project Space NYC.

Jennifer photographed the Hollywood that matters to her: “From casting to continuity, everyone had a bit of a giggle and love for Polaroid photography, which made this project so significant to the history of Hollywood and its relationship with Polaroid.”

On Vice, Jennifer provides precious private glimpses behind her shooting with Angus Scrimm- click to read!

No. 291

Viewfinder: Martin Cartwright's "Gray's Anatomy" Series

Patrick Tobin | 1629 days ago

Howdy, friends, and welcome back to Viewfinder, our blog series that highlights interesting projects involving Impossible film. This entry focuses on UK-based software engineer and photo-artist Martin Cartwright who has created beautiful photocollages in his “Gray’s Anatomy” series…

“This project came about pretty much by chance mid-way through 2011. I had been loving the look of the Impossible films I had, especially the Black Frame PX 600, but was struggling for a subject. I mostly shoot landscape stuff and the only integral film cameras I have are a Spirit 600 and a run down Sonar Autofocus 5000, which don’t really work for me in that role compared to my Bronica. I’d seen the newsletter, and a little video on the Impossible blog, about turning Black Frame shots into transparencies by peeling them, and it seemed like a fun thing to try – especially since I’d been having real trouble keeping my shots from turning orange with age – but I still didn’t have a subject.

So then on one of my occasional Saturday circuits of the local charity shops on the look-out for cheap and fun old cameras I stumbled across a copy of a facsimile reprint of the first edition of Gray’s Anatomy. This is a landmark 750-page medical textbook with over 350 incredible hand-drawn (by H. V. Carter, M.D.) illustrations of the structure of the human bodybones, blood vessels, muscles, nerves, organs, the lot. Right there I had my idea – what if I could overlay the Impossible transparencies of photographs of the body onto the relevant figures from Gray’s?

It turned out just superimposing the photos doesn’t look great, but doing a full on emulsion lift/transfer does. After a bit of trial and error I found the method that works – scan an interesting figure from the book, take a shot to match, then print out the figure at a size to match the photo. Then it’s out with the water trays to transfer the emulsion onto the print. When I get it right it looks just how I’d imagined it when I first saw the book – a glimpse through the skin to the incredible structures beneath that make us all function. Some of these are things I’d never really thought about. Bones and muscles are pretty familiar to everyone, but I’d never really seen the lymphatic system mapped out like this before, for example, and the details of how the nerves are threaded through your face are fascinating.

I think the Impossible films are the perfect medium for this, for its tone and how easy it is to do the peel and lift. I’ve used mainly PX 600 and the antique sepia look fits perfectly. I recently tried with some of the PX 680 Color Shade film and after the lift that has a different, washed-out blue tone that also seems just right. I also like how the whole process fits with the idea – to reveal what’s under my own skin I’m “flaying” the photo instead – and the unpredictability of it all. As well as the imprecise framing of each shot – I don’t know if you’ve ever tried taking an arms length self-portrait in profile with a camera as ergonomically awful as a Spirit 600, but it’s not easy – the colours and tone also vary from shot to shot, and the rips and folds in the transferred emulsion all add to the look of each one.

So far I’ve done nineteen of these, but there are dozens more possibilities in the book. Each time I make one of these, I learn something about the process so I’m continually tweaking. For example, the most recent ones I did included a couple of double transfers – two photos onto one figure – which means I can make the whole piece bigger. This is definitely an ongoing project.”

To see more of Martin’s series, please visit his Flickr Photoset and for Martin’s other photos, visit his Flickr Photo Stream

No. 292

HOLDEN x THE IMPOSSIBLE PROJECT

Jon Campolo, | 1629 days ago

The Impossible Project is thrilled to announce a partnership with Holden Outerwear to celebrate 10 years of creative and cutting edge outerwear. Holden is proud to support Impossible on their mission to bring analog instant photography back to life by offering limited edition Holden X Impossible camera kits, which will include a Holden customized and refurbished vintage SX-70 Polaroid camera, Holden X Tanner Goods leather camera case, and a custom Holden X Impossible co-produced instant film and filter presented in a custom wooden box.

To activate this collaboration, Holden chose 10 well known photographers to use Impossible film to shoot and capture their vision of an independent lifestyle through instant photography. The photos will be traveling in a multinational exhibition throughout Impossible galleries and at trade shows worldwide, including the most prestigious art show in the Americas, Art Basel Miami Beach. Choice photos will be used to create a limited edition Holden X Impossible tee shirt collection. Additionally, there will be a consumer instant photography competition, hosted by Impossible, where one lucky winner will have their work featured in the exhibitions (details on the competition to come)!

The Holden X Impossible camera kits and shirts will be available at Holdenouterwear.com, selected boutiques worldwide, and all Holden X Impossible exhibitions this Fall.

Ben Puess, CEO of Holden said, “If you have ever seen a Holden ad or website, then you know our love of analog photography goes back to our inception. As big fans of the medium, we could not be more proud to be working with The Impossible Project to help continue to further promote and support an art form we cherish. The Impossible team are the champions of a lost art and we are happy to showcase the immense warmth and creativity in their film…”

Stay tuned for more details on all the aspects of this fantastic collaboration!

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No. 293

8 Exposures...with Sean Rohde.

Patrick Tobin | 1628 days ago

Hi there, friends! Welcome back to 8 Exposures, our instant film question & answer series. This week, we spoke with Phoenix, AZ-based Sean Rohde

1) Q: What kind of Polaroid camera(s) do you use?

A: Loaded Question! I mostly use my 190 and 195, but I also have a 180, Fuji Fotorama FP-1, Mamiya Universal, Crown Graphic with Polaroid and Fuji backs, SX-70 Model 2 (white), SX-70 Alpha 1 Model 2 (black and modified for 600), Colorpack III, Big Swinger 3000, and some other stuff, plus things I have owned and sold in the past, like a Konica Instant Press and modified roll film cameras, as well as various plastic hard case and folder cameras. I would love to have a 185 to complete my collection, but they seemed to have gone up in value in the past two years to some ridiculous prices. I have to use my cameras, not just look at them on a shelf.

2) Q: Why do you like instant photography?

A: Well, certainly the fact that it is instant is a draw. Though sometimes I don’t peel my 100 and 80 for six hours so I guess they aren’t always so instant. There is just a certain quality that instant films have that film doesn’t have. Color shifts, textures??…??it all kind of gives photos a vintage quality that I like. Plus, there is (was) such a large variety of film types that there are lots of effects to work with that are inherent in the films. ??Chocolate is different than ID-UV, which is different than PX 70, etc. I’ve shot enough Polaroid by now that I know pretty much exactly how to get the look that I want in most lighting situations for different films. ID-UV in sunlight with a filter, Type 672 as the sun sets, etc.

3) Q: What is your earliest memory of instant film?

A: I received what was probably a Super Shooter (plastic hard case Polaroid) in 1978 for my 8th birthday from family friends. I mostly just shot amazing photos of my gerbils, stuffed animals and friends. Nothing too exciting…not exactly a child Polaroid prodigy. But I have quite a few family Polaroids, even some peel-aparts of my pregnant mother and me at a day or so old.

4) Q: What’s your favorite Impossible Project film type?

A: I’m still working on that one! It has been really hit or miss for me so far with a low success rate. I like the black-and-white PX 600 and I ordered some of the test PX 70 recently. I like a lot of what I see from other users so I’m looking forward to something that will survive being shot in Arizona sun without just blowing out. But I really dig the colors that others have been getting from the recent color films.

5) Q: What are your favorite subjects to photograph?

A: Mostly things out in the desert. I like abandonment and decay. But I shoot wherever I am, and really enjoy shooting people. There just aren’t that many people out in the middle of nowhere. I was just in New Mexico, and the entire state has a lower population than Phoenix, AZ, and most of the people here live in Phoenix, so a lot of the rest of the state is empty. One of the things I enjoyed about shooting in Japan was the number of people around me. Overall, I’m more of an outside photographer rather than studio or in-home shooting. Some people seem to get away with 2,000 photos taken in their living room. I need to get out and see things. I actually really enjoy being out in the middle of nowhere with nobody around, as well.

6) Q: Tell us about a project you’re working on.

A: I don’t specifically have projects, though I did just put together a book of 35mm photographs from Japan. I mostly have themes that I shoot, which mostly involves desert decay. But I have more of an Eggleston state of mind…I wander around and shoot what catches my eye, rather than specifically seeking out what I see as an idea in my head. Though if I have a model, I will have specific photos I know I want to take.

7) Q: Who are your favorite photographers, instant or otherwise?

A: William Eggleston, Robert Adams and Stephen Shore, to name a few. I like photography books, so I have a wide range of photographic tastes. I like a lot of Japanese photographers, as well. Oddly enough, I can’t really think of any specific instant photographers. It seems like more of a secondary option for many photographers, like Ansel Adams. There is lots of stuff that I like, but it’s more photo specific rather than photographer specific. I like a lot of the work some of my friends do, like Skorj, and a lot of what I see on Flickr. But I’m also pretty picky and get bored with a lot of it…I like my own work!

8) Q: If you could take a photo of anyone or anything what would it be?

A: I would love to drag my Polaroid 190 to the top of Everest and take some photos. I’m fairly willing to be burdened down by cameras, and it would be great to take some instant shots in really difficult places that probably haven’t been shot with Polaroid. I was just at Ship Rock in New Mexico, and wondered if I had the first ever Greyhound and the first 190 with ID-UV on top of the “tail” that extends from the main plug.

About Sean:

“I’ve lived in Phoenix, AZ, since 1997 and spent most of my life before that in northwest Indiana. I am currently an RN on a telemetry floor (which is nice because I only work three nights a week with plenty of time to shoot), and previously I spent 10 years doing magazine work. And I made pizza for a long time. I have a greyhound that goes with me on all of my road trips. She sleeps in the truck during the day, and at Motel 6 at night. She seems to enjoy it.”

Special thanks to Sean for taking part in 8 Exposures! To see more of his work, please visit his Flickr Photo Stream

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No. 294

Instant Revolution Recap!

Jon Campolo, | 1624 days ago

Photo by Jesse Freidin

This past Thursday, both Impossible and Polaroid celebrated the opening of Instant Revolution at the Impossible Project NYC Space. With this inaugural exhibition commemorating the Polaroid Classic Line and an ongoing collaboration between two world-leading analog instant pioneers, Instant Revolution portrayed the revolutionary aspects of how artists create, consider and define analog photography. Attendees took in the many shades of the last original Polaroid Spectra film ever produced, while enjoying the warmth of live vinyl music and the company of friends and enthusiasts. Our good friends and fellow Impossible fanatics, Jesse Freidin and Patrick Tobin, were there to capture all the action on PX100 UV+ and PZ600 UV+.

Thank you so much to all who attended, and congratulations to the artists! Instant Revolution will be on display at the Impossible Project NYC Space during regular open hours: Monday through Friday 11am–7pm and on Weekends 12pm–5pm until March 23rd, don’t miss your chance to see it!

No. 295

Goedendag from Enschede

Factory Team | 1624 days ago

A heartily welcome to the very first blog entry created by the Impossible factory team! From now on we will send digital signs of life live from our very analog location, sharing minor and major news with the Impossible blog readers.

Beyond daring to stir up the blogosphere (you should know that most of us were about 20 years old when computers where introduced, but in our 50ties when blogs and social media started ) we also ventured to submit our very own project amongst all your crazy fantastic 101 Ways projects – thanks for checking out project #307

Looking forward to sharing our daily Impossible ambitions, actions and news with you!

No. 296

The Camera Museum: Polaroid Presto!

Patrick Tobin, | 1623 days ago

The Polaroid Presto! camera was first introduced in 1978, a slight variation on the non-folding SX-70 One Step camera. Its rigid plastic body and fixed focus single element 103mm f/14.6 plastic lens made it a more affordable option than the folding SX-70 models.

The Presto! has a tan and black body with the trademark Polaroid rainbow stripe, an electronic shutter, programmed auto exposure and a socket for flashbars or electronic flash units.

The Presto! works with any of the Impossible Project SX-70 films, including PX 70 Color Shade film and PX 100 Silver Shade UV+ film

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No. 297

Viewfinder: Danny Sanchez

Patrick Tobin | 1622 days ago

Greetings, Viewfinder fans. We are proud to present you with a shiny new entry, this week featuring San Francisco photog Danny Sanchez

“Hello instant film friends! My name is Danny Sanchez and I am an instant film photographer from the San Francisco Bay Area. Like many who grew up in the 1980s, I have fond memories of my parents pulling out the family Polaroid Sun 600 to capture important moments from my childhood. I never expected those happy moments would later resurface and ignite a passion for instant film in my adult years.

In the process of getting to know the new instant films by the Impossible Project, I have photographed many subjects from toys to botanicals, and experimented with multiple exposures. My latest direction has taken me into the night. While experimenting with night photography, it reminded me of one of my favorite college assignments, “the color of night.” This assignment opened my eyes to the magic of night photography, by seeing the effects of mixing available light, and exposing the mysteries in the shadows with long exposures. The question I asked myself, “what would happen if I brought the magic of instant film and night photography together?”

I have used PX 70FF, PX 100 film and PX 680 Gold Frame film my SX-70 and SLR 680 cameras. It has been fun to learn how these cameras think when faced with photographing at night. Some of my favorite images have been taken with PX 680 Gold Frame. This film is very adaptable, with its fast ISO, and has yielded wonderful colors! I consider my Night Studies to be in its infancy, but I am excited to see what magic lies ahead as I continue to experiment!”

To see more of Danny’s work, please visit his website, http://www.dollebrities.com/ and his Facebook Page.

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No. 298

8 Exposures...with George Weiss III.

Patrick Tobin, | 1621 days ago

Hello, Impossibles! We’re happy to bring you another entry in our ever-popular question and answer series, 8 Exposures. In this episode, the man of the hour is George Weiss III, a photographer based in Philadelphia, specializing in weddings and portraits, with a love for analog photography…

1) Q: What kind of Polaroid camera(s) do you use?

A: I have a bunch, I’m a bit of a hoarder, er, I mean collector, but I primarily use a couple SX-70 Sonars, an SLR 680, and I have a 250 for packfilm.

2) Q: Why do you like instant photography?

A: Hmph, where do I start? I think the biggest reason is the fact that it has a life and a soul that can’t be found in any other medium. I love the feeling of anticipation I get when I’ve taken a photo and I’m waiting for it to develop or to peel it. It’s magic.

3) Q: What is your earliest memory of instant film?

A: I have a lot of pictures of myself as a child (probably in the 3-year-old range) that were taken by my grandfather but I don’t actually remember them being taken. When I was a young child in the 80’s, Polaroid photos were so ubiquitous it was hard to avoid them.

4) Q: What’s your favorite Impossible Project film type?

A: That’s tough. I love the new Gold Frame PX 680 but I think there was something really special about the PX 70 First Flush. Some of my favorite photos were taken on that.

5) Q: What are your favorite subjects to photograph?

A: Anything that inspires me :)

6) Q: Tell us about a project you’re working on.

A: Nothing too serious but I’m trying to come out of my shell and do a little bit more street work.

7) Q: Who are your favorite photographers, instant or otherwise?

A: I think my favorite famous/historic photographer has to be Henri-Cartier Bresson. Since I do a lot of wedding photography, much of my inspiration is from that world. I really love the work of Ash Imagery, and Jose Villa’s stuff is gorgeous as well.

I have a ton of favorite instant photographers and I’m not going to start naming names because I’m afraid I’ll miss someone and regret it, but you only need to look as far as the Impossible Project Flickr group for a huge amount of inspiration. Mikael Kennedy’s work also really speaks to me.

8) Q: If you could take a photo of anyone or anything what would it be?

A: That’s a tough one but one of my heroes is Kurt Vonnegut and I’d love to be able to take his portrait.

Special thanks to George for taking part in 8 Exposures! To see more of his photography, please visit his Flickr Photo Stream?? ??and follow him on Twitter at @themadstork

No. 299

Taming PUSH! film

Frank Love | 1620 days ago

From its inception PX70 PUSH! film challenged photographers with its unique chemical composition and specific shooting requirements. Now that it has aged it has become a different beast all together – one that requires an extra level of taming. We recommend considering the following crucial points when working with PX 70 Color Shade PUSH! film:

LIGHT
A strong flash will support image details the best. Use of artificial or day light will create a more soft-focus effect.

DISTANCE
The closer the motif, the better the results!

MOTIF
Don’t go for the white horse in the snow. Only motifs that are rich in contrast and color will create decent results.

TEMPERATURE
PX 70 Color Shade PUSH! film has always preferred warm temperatures while shooting and processing (more than 15°C/59°F). Flickr Forum – Heating Your PUSH!

SHIELDING
Make absolutely sure that NO light at all hits the image as it ejects from the camera. Click here for all shielding methods

TIME
Be patient. PX 70 Color Shade PUSH! images need about 12 hours to to fully develop and display final results.

PRESERVATION
To make sure your PUSH! images do not fade over time or shift to a blue color due to humidity, we recommend lifting or peeling the image. Click here for a Lifting tutorial.

18
No. 300

The Camera Museum: Polaroid Sun 600 LMS

Patrick Tobin, | 1619 days ago

The Polaroid Sun 600 LMS camera was first introduced in 1983. Though the exposure adjustment switch was available on several earlier models, it wasn’t christened the Light Management System until the Sun 600’s release.

A basic 600-series camera, the Sun 600 features a 116mm single-element plastic lens, fixed focus with a minimal focal length of 4 feet, electronic shutter and a built-in electronic flash.

Polaroid’s 600 cameras were well-known for their television commercials featuring James Garner and Mariette Hartley, and the Sun 600 LMS was no exception. Watch the 1983 commercial HERE

The Sun 600 LMS works with any of Impossible’s 600-speed film. For a complete selection of compatible films, click HERE

20
No. 301

Impossible Workshop @ Rough Trade London

Frank Love | 1617 days ago

Saturday, 25 February 2012
Rough Trade East
Old Truman Brewery
91 Brick Lane
London E1 6QL

As of Saturday 25th February, Rough Trade East will be hosting monthly workshops with the UK Impossible expert Tom Wright.

The first one being IMPOSSIBLE PROJECT 101 WORKSHOP. This hands on workshop is your chance to dust off your polaroid camera and start taking fantastic artistic pictures with the new Impossible films.

Tom will show you how to get the best out of your vintage polaroid cameras (if you don’t have one don’t worry you can lend one) and he will cover topics ranging from shielding techniques and temperature control helping you to harness this film’s unique character. After an introduction to the film you will have the chance to take to the streets and shoot your brains out.

Places are limited so we’d advise you book tickets sooner rather than later and you can do so here.

21
No. 302

About trap slitting

Factory Team | 1617 days ago

We are not called Impossible for nothing! By combining our team’s knowledge and efforts we celebrated a unique occasion this week: we are now able to slit trap (an integral and important part of each Impossible images) material in house! Not even in the Polaroid days was the factory able to slit trap material in house – it was considered simply impossible…. now we know it is Impossible!

Edwin ten Hove, whom you can see on the photo, is now operating this machine. The machine slits the trap material, which you need to neutralize and absorb surplus paste at the top of each picture. By absorbing surplus paste, the trap prevents paste from leaking out of the picture. And by adding neutralizing chemicals, paste that still may manage to escape from the frame is less harmful.

This little “endeavor to persevere” saves our company many thousands of Euros that we are now able to dedicate to further developing our precious film and to resolve production related issues.

No. 303

Impossible Project Space NYC presents: MOMENTUM

Jon Campolo, | 1616 days ago

March 1 – June 26, 2012
6-9PM
Impossible Project Space NYC
425 Broadway
5th Floor New York
NY 10013
Thom Jackson

It has been almost two years since the very first release of Impossible instant film, the wildly anticipated new black & white instant film for Polaroid SX-70 cameras. Although the film was initially in a developmental stage and highly experimental, it dawned on both fanatics and photographers alike that the impossible actually could become possible.
Just 19 months later, Impossible has released 12 unique film types for three separate Polaroid camera systems. Although the journey has been short, the length Impossible has come represents a milestone in reviving instant analog photography.

Using Impossible’s latest color and black & white films, twelve carefully selected photographers are illustrating a MOMENTUM that will carry instant analog photography through the digital age and beyond: Anne Bowerman, Brian Henry, Brooke Castro,
Thom Jackson, Bradley Johnson, Whitney Johnson, Clay Lipsky, Peter Plaia, Jessica
Reinhardt, Patrick Tobin, Yana Toyber and Max Wanger.

The Opening Reception will take place on March 1 from 6pm to 9pm in presence of
some of the artists with live music by DJ Tied Eyed and refreshments provided.
Please rsvp@the-impossible-project.com

CLICK HERE to view exhibition DETAILS

22
No. 304

Viewfinder: Erin McGuire

Patrick Tobin | 1615 days ago

Hello, fellow shooters, and welcome back to Viewfinder! This week, we train our lens on west coast student, computer tech specialist and photographer Erin McGuire

“I live on the western edge of the Mojave desert in the Palmdale/Lancaster part of Los Angeles county. It’s a diverse community with some areas being very well off financially and others that are literally living in the dirt. The area gets used by Hollywood quite often so there is a rich movie history here as well. The landscape is as diverse as the community because we are situated where the desert meets the mountains. There are oak trees mixed with Joshua trees, bobcats mixed with mountain lions and Mojave rattlers mixed with western diamond backs. The strange beauty of this place inspires me to shoot on a daily basis but it was Impossible Project film that got me moving in a fine art direction.

I have a deep, emotional connection with the land that I formed as a young child when we’d go camping in this area. Impossible Project film with its mysterious artifacts and its sensitivity to light creates images that, for me, embody the spiritual connection I have with the land. I’ve used PX 100 Silver Shade, PX 70 Color Shade, PX 600 Silver Shade, and PZ 600 Silver Shade. Impossible film is my film of choice for photographing this land and its inhabitants. I also love to shoot the Paul Giambarba Polaroid Chocolate film, which I also got from The Impossible Project, for the same reasons.

Certain images shown here have been selected by Wall Space Gallery to be sold in their Life Support Japan auction, have been honored by the International Photography Awards in their 2011 show and selected to be published in the second issue of Films and Grains magazine and the final issue of Light Leaks magazine.”

To see more of Erin’s work, please visit her Flickr photo stream

24
No. 305

The Impossible Flash Bar

Frank Love | 1613 days ago

The Impossible Flash Bar attaches to the flash connector of your folding as well as box-type SX-70 camera.

To celebrate the 40th birthday of the legendary SX-70 camera Impossible proudly presents the first electronic flash bar ever. Developed by the nifty engineers Ryan Ma and Tom Cheun from Mint Hongkong, the Impossible Flash Bar is a new and extremely compact and light flash unit for all Polaroid folding and box-type SX-70 cameras. Perfectly attaching to your SX-70 camera’s flash connector it enables you to take brilliant and perfectly illuminated images in all light situations and puts forward the following additional features:

- Special, switchable ND-compensation mode allows you to use 600 ASA film in SX-70 cameras – Light temperature is optimized for use with Impossible Silver and Color Shade films – Easy LED display on state of flash settings and energy – Detailed user manual – Powered by 2 AAA cells (not included!)

Go to Online Shop

25
No. 306

The Camera Museum: Polaroid Supercolor 635 CL

Patrick Tobin | 1612 days ago

The Polaroid Supercolor 635 CL camera is one of numerous variations on the box-style plastic bodied 600 cameras produced throughout the 80s and early 90s. The Supercolor 635 CL has the trademark rainbow stripe down the face.

The Supercolor 635 CL has a 116mm single-element plastic lens, fixed focus, programmed automatic exposure system and a built-in electronic flash. One nice feature on the Supercolor 635 CL is the sliding close-up lens, allowing the user to get photos as close to their subject as 2 feet, unlike many other 600 cameras with a minimal focal length of 4 feet.

The Supercolor 635 CL works with any of Impossible’s 600-series film, which can be found HERE

We also have Supercolor camera kits available HERE

27
No. 307

Dr. Love's Tips - My Kingdom for Some Opacity

Patrick Tobin | 1610 days ago

The good doctor.

Hello again, Love Patients! This week Dr. Love explains a little about Impossible films’ light sensitivity…

Some of you may wonder why Impossible film needs to be covered from light when it first comes out of a camera when Polaroid film didn’t. If Polaroid film could be exposed to light, why can’t Impossible’s film be?

The short answer to this is…“Opacification Layer.” This is a layer within the film, that upon the spreading of the developer chemistry, reacts in a way that blocks out almost all light from affecting the lower (still light-sensitive) layers…of the film. As instant film has a regular film negative at its base, will still be sensitive to light until it’s been fully processed. Think of the Opacification layer, or opacifier, as a chemical curtain that needs to be drawn over the film to protect the image you’ve created.

Now you might be thinking, “What’s hard about this?” Well the answer to that is the fact that this layer that has to block almost all light, even strong sunlight and has to then dissolve away and become completely clear in order for your image to appear on the film.

So herein lies the challenge…it’s simply one of the most sizably complex of all the challenges in making the film, and it’s expensive. It’s thankfully not an issue that renders the film unusable, as many of you may know from using a PX Shade or Frog Tongue…or even simply a dark slide, there’s always a way around it, but…

…How did Polaroid do it?

Among other components, Polaroid used one ingredient called ‘Titanium Oxide’ or TiO2 as one key component for their Opacification layer. Being that the number 1 reason Impossible couldn’t simply keep making Polaroid film is that the lion’s share of materials were all gone and literally impossible to recreate. Now TiO2 is not entirely ‘extinct’ in the supply, but is scarce enough it’d be like trying to base a new diet around the dodo bird when you’re looking at the last one. It is also incredibly expensive to recreate, like “blank check” expensive, so to build a series of films on it would be expensive, and not last. It also wasn’t 100% perfect, that’s why Polaroid put their own, shorter ‘frog tongues’ on all cameras since the plastic-bodied SX-70 OneSteps, to protect the film in those first moments of ejection.

Impossible is working on finding a more sustainable solution to this issue. With some time and a lot of R&D, there will one day again be the chance to watch your images develop before your eyes, even outside. For a sense of scale, it took Polaroid 17 years to initially develop their first integral film, let alone the years of refinements, so at about 2 years in, a little bit more patience should give us all that satisfaction once again.

Keep your rollers clean, -f

29
No. 308

PX 680 in Fireworks Night music video

Frank Love | 1608 days ago

Photographer Rob Munday created a stunning music video for the British band Fireworks Night and their new single “Amongst the Disappeared”, using Impossible’s PX 680 Color Shade film.

No. 309

Viewfinder: Mark von Minden's "autumnsongs"

Patrick Tobin, | 1608 days ago

Welcome back to Viewfinder, our feature highlighting interesting projects people are working on incorporating Impossible Film. This entry focuses on Colorado-based software engineer and photographer Mark von Minden’s autumnsongs series.

autumnsongs is an evolving analog instant photography series. Each autumn a set of new instant photographs are paired with a corresponding set of songs by a variety of artists which are then mixed into a DJ set by Mark. While autumn colors and leaves were the original subject matter, there is also a strong element of abstraction within the work. Ultimately, an overall theme of change and progression informs Mark’s approach to the project each year.

To see more of Mark’s series, please visit autumnsongs.net and his Flickr Photo Sets

No. 303

Impossible Project Space NYC presents: MOMENTUM

Jon Campolo, | 1616 days ago

March 1 – June 26, 2012
6-9PM
Impossible Project Space NYC
425 Broadway
5th Floor New York
NY 10013
Thom Jackson

It has been almost two years since the very first release of Impossible instant film, the wildly anticipated new black & white instant film for Polaroid SX-70 cameras. Although the film was initially in a developmental stage and highly experimental, it dawned on both fanatics and photographers alike that the impossible actually could become possible.
Just 19 months later, Impossible has released 12 unique film types for three separate Polaroid camera systems. Although the journey has been short, the length Impossible has come represents a milestone in reviving instant analog photography.

Using Impossible’s latest color and black & white films, twelve carefully selected photographers are illustrating a MOMENTUM that will carry instant analog photography through the digital age and beyond: Anne Bowerman, Brian Henry, Brooke Castro,
Thom Jackson, Bradley Johnson, Whitney Johnson, Clay Lipsky, Peter Plaia, Jessica
Reinhardt, Patrick Tobin, Yana Toyber and Max Wanger.

The Opening Reception will take place on March 1 from 6pm to 9pm in presence of
some of the artists with live music by DJ Tied Eyed and refreshments provided.
Please rsvp@the-impossible-project.com

CLICK HERE to view exhibition DETAILS

No. 301

Impossible Workshop @ Rough Trade London

Frank Love | 1617 days ago

Saturday, 25 February 2012
Rough Trade East
Old Truman Brewery
91 Brick Lane
London E1 6QL

As of Saturday 25th February, Rough Trade East will be hosting monthly workshops with the UK Impossible expert Tom Wright.

The first one being IMPOSSIBLE PROJECT 101 WORKSHOP. This hands on workshop is your chance to dust off your polaroid camera and start taking fantastic artistic pictures with the new Impossible films.

Tom will show you how to get the best out of your vintage polaroid cameras (if you don’t have one don’t worry you can lend one) and he will cover topics ranging from shielding techniques and temperature control helping you to harness this film’s unique character. After an introduction to the film you will have the chance to take to the streets and shoot your brains out.

Places are limited so we’d advise you book tickets sooner rather than later and you can do so here.

No. 294

Instant Revolution Recap!

Jon Campolo, | 1624 days ago

Photo by Jesse Freidin

This past Thursday, both Impossible and Polaroid celebrated the opening of Instant Revolution at the Impossible Project NYC Space. With this inaugural exhibition commemorating the Polaroid Classic Line and an ongoing collaboration between two world-leading analog instant pioneers, Instant Revolution portrayed the revolutionary aspects of how artists create, consider and define analog photography. Attendees took in the many shades of the last original Polaroid Spectra film ever produced, while enjoying the warmth of live vinyl music and the company of friends and enthusiasts. Our good friends and fellow Impossible fanatics, Jesse Freidin and Patrick Tobin, were there to capture all the action on PX100 UV+ and PZ600 UV+.

Thank you so much to all who attended, and congratulations to the artists! Instant Revolution will be on display at the Impossible Project NYC Space during regular open hours: Monday through Friday 11am–7pm and on Weekends 12pm–5pm until March 23rd, don’t miss your chance to see it!

No. 282

Announcing Instant Revolution @ The Impossible Project NYC Space!

Jon Campolo, | 1636 days ago

February 9 – March 23, 2012
6pm-9pm
The Impossible Project Space NYC
425 Broadway
5th Floor
New York NY 10013
Gary Baseman
  • James Franco
  • Maripol
  • Mary Ellen Mark
  • Jennifer Juniper Stratford

POLAROID and IMPOSSIBLE present
INSTANT REVOLUTION

To celebrate the collaboration between Polaroid and Impossible, The Impossible Project NYC Space will host a very special group exhibition dedicated to showcasing five of the world’s freshest contemporary photographers. For more than 60 years, the instant image has been a revolutionary aspect of how artists create, consider and define analog photography. The five artists featured in INSTANT REVOLUTION all take different approaches to illustrating their relationship with analog photography.

Featuring photos captured with the last original Polaroid Spectra film production run from 2008, one of the first products introduced as part of the Polaroid Classic line, five of the world’s most dynamic and contemporary artists have contributed to INSTANT REVOLUTION: Gary Baseman, James Franco, Maripol, Mary Ellen Mark and Jennifer Juniper Stratford. INSTANT REVOLUTION will be shown at The Impossible Project Space NYC from February 9 to March 23 2012 and on our official website. The Opening Reception will take place on February 9 from 6pm to 9pm, in the presence of the artists and with refreshments provided.

POLAROID and IMPOSSIBLE present
INSTANT REVOLUTION
at The Impossible Project Space NYC

February 9, 2012 – March 23, 2012

Opening Reception:
Thursday February 9, 2012. 6pm-9pm.

RSVP: rsvp@theimpossibleproject.com

Open to the public during open hours
Monday to Friday: 11am to 7pm
Saturday and Sunday: 12pm to 5pm

No. 281

Workshops in England!

Frank Love, | 1636 days ago

February 11 and February 25
Manchester and London

For all those Impossible loving UK people there is a full schedule of workshops planned for Manchester and London in 2012. These hands on workshops are a chance for you to dust off your Polaroid camera and start taking fantastic artistic pictures with the whole range of Impossible films.

Our UK Impossible expert Tom Wright will show you how to get the best out of vintage Polaroid cameras (don’t worry if you don’t have one, we will be able to lend you one, but please indicate this while booking)

Tom will cover topics ranging from shielding techniques and temperature control helping you to harness the film’s unique character.

The Manchester workshop takes place at Incognito, 5 Stevenson Square on Saturday 11th February at 3pm. Book a place here

The London workshop takes place at Rough Trade East, Brick Lane on Saturday 25th February at 11am. Book a place here