April 2012

1
No. 352

Kids by Monika Elena Kost

Frank Love | 1642 days ago

Monika Elena Kost is a kids photographer from San Francisco, currently living in Denmark and working throughout Europe.

Being attracted to anything in photography that allows her to show lightness and sun and a poetic feeling, Monika started using vintage polaroid film about 6 years ago and has recently started loving the new Impossible films as well.

Monika’s latest images were created for NORO Paris, a French clothing line. Also, she has currently her own show combination vintage polaroids with new Impossible film in Berlin.

Learn more about Monika on her site.

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No. 353

Booked Out

Frank Love | 1640 days ago

Booked Out is the debut feature by Glaswegian filmmaker Bryan O’Neil. An indie drama following Ailidh, who has two loves in this world: spying on her neighbours (using amongst others Polaroid camera) and writing graphic novels.

Booked Out was premiered March 6, Henry Barnes of The Guardian says: “Ailidh’s world view is infectious. You find yourself lead down into this kooky kerfuffle with a genuine, if bemused, sense of affection.”

Click for further screening dates.

No. 354

WORK IN PROGRESS RECAP!

Jon Campolo, | 1640 days ago

Last Thursday, The Impossible Project Space NYC celebrated the opening of its first ever group staff show WORK IN PROGRESS. The exhibition showcased work by our dedicated, creative and analog obsessed staff as well as how far Impossible has come since its very first test batches and beta films. Guests experienced the entire spectrum of Impossible materials produced within the last two years, while our staff captured the event on digital and PX100UV+ with the new Mint Flash Bar. Everyone enjoyed live vinyl music, refreshments and the company of friends and fellow enthusiasts.

Thank you to all who attended, and congratulations to the artists! WORK IN PROGRESS will be on display at the Impossible Project NYC Space during regular open hours: Monday through Friday 11am–7pm and on Weekends 12pm–5pm until May 8th. Don’t miss your chance to see it!

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No. 355

NYC SPACE UPCOMING EVENTS - APRIL 2012

Jon Campolo, | 1640 days ago

Ongoing Exhibition MOMENTUM
1st of March – 26th of June 2012
A 200 square foot show of our
best and brightest new films for the
SX-70 camera. PX-70 & PX 100 UV+
images by a group of our select US
photographers.

For more info please visit:
http://www.the-impossible-project.com/projects/exhibitions/momentum

Ongoing Exhibition WORK IN PROGRESS
29th of March – 1st of May 2012
A large part of what makes Impossible so
special is it’s dedicated, creative and
analog obsessed staff.
With an intimate knowledge of these
sometimes unpredictable materials,
the Impossible team members have
become masters of the unknown.

For more info please visit:
http://www.the-impossible-project.com/projects/exhibitions/workinprogress

SPECTRA WORKSHOP
UPDATEWORKSHOP CANCELLED!
We apologize for any inconvenience.
Sunday 15th of April – 10am to 1pm
A three hour interactive workshop on
maximizing Impossible film in Polaroid
Spectra Cameras.

To Register please call +1 212 219 3254

CHLOE AFTEL’S NUDE WORKSHOP
UPDATEWORKSHOP RESCHEDULED TO MAY 27TH 9AM-12PM
We apologize for any inconvenience.
Acclaimed photographer Chloe Aftel
reveals her professional techniques
on shooting nude models with
Impossible Film.

To Register please call +1 212 219 3254

ANALOG FEEDBACK
Thursday 26th of April – 6pm to 9pm
A NEW monthly evening for Instant
Photography enthusiasts can share
their latest work on Impossible film
and talk about photographic techniques,
film & camera types and trouble shooting.

No. 356

Factory Shots 1/8

Factory Team | 1640 days ago

Photo by Lia Sáile

1/8 The Impossible Lobby

Every morning more than 30 factory workers are passing through our beautiful 70s style entrance lobby of Building Noord (North).

Since its early days this building has been the heart of the Polaroid film production plant, housing the giant production machines.

Upon starting the Impossible Project we moved all other machinery required to start re-production of instant film into this very building. With this new and modern setup, production was downscaled from 3-4 buildings in Polaroid times to just one building.

Click here to take a virtual tour through our factory.

8 Factory Shots will present one photo a week for eight weeks.

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No. 357

Viewfinder: Dr. J. Caldwell's "Instants Destroyed"

Patrick Tobin, | 1639 days ago

Welcome back to Viewfinder, our series focusing on interesting projects involving Impossible film. For this entry, we spoke with Dr. J Caldwell

“At approximately the same time the Impossible Project was taking the reigns from Polaroid, there emerged a glut of apps that would allow you to near-perfectly emulate the instant film look. We’ve all viewed the stereotypical square format instant film photo with white border, but it has become increasingly difficult to discriminate whether it was uploaded from a smartphone or the real McCoy carefully scanned and shared. I started thinking about how instant film, at least in the traditional sense, isn’t merely viewing the photo, but moreover physically passing around a a sturdy-pre-framed sliver of time is a visceral and palpable experience.

I thought that there had to be a way to unambiguously show the viewer that what they are looking at “exists” in the real world and that, upon viewing, they should immediately feel its dimensions and texture while also still being able to view the photo amidst the carnage. This is when I started my “instants destroyed” project.

I have mangled just about every film from the Impossible Project, starting with a NSFW Push! photo that I took a lighter to and a microwaved version of the 600 UV+ Silver Shade film. Not surprisingly, I find the manipulations that work best are the high energetics methods like lighters, microwaves, ovens, boiling and exposures soaked in pure alcohol and lit aflame. Perhaps my most ambitious was the hour-long soak in pure hydrochloric acid that first melted the black frame and, with a little help from razor slits into the plastic cover, slowly ate away the emulsion.

While true instant film photography, the kind you can feel, pass around, mount and mail, is becoming increasingly rarified, my aim with this project is to imbue the tactile sense of the instant film phenomenon into what is becoming more and more a purely visual medium. I can control the elements to wreak utter havoc on the exposure and obscure every iota or take a more focused approach and burn or slice out an exact portion of the frame. In a sense these manipulations challenge the idea that, once the photo has been exposed and developed, it is a frozen moment in time, unwavering and unchanging. I think of forensics departments scanning harsh polaroids from ghastly evidence files and tossing the originals into a fire, of long lost photos of former lovers crumpled and cut to shreds and of photo albums left in musty storage too close to a heater slowly curling in on themselves.”

You can see more destroyed instant film from J Caldwell in a forthcoming issue of Fixation magazine and more of his photography (instant or otherwise) at http://meowtaco.com and http://jcaldwell.tumblr.com.

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No. 358

Photoshow Rome 2012 Recap!

Frank Love | 1638 days ago

Fabio Interra

The Impossible events at the Photoshow Rome 2012 have been a total success! Amongst 300 exhibitors and more than 80.000 visitors the beautiful Impossible booth and all analog actions that took place fascinated the visitors and continuously guaranteed a stunning crowd of amazed visitors.

Impossible is proud to have – thanks to our Italian partner Nital and the precious support of Polaroiders – attended one of the greatest Photoshows in Rome ever. A special thanks herewith also goes to Beppe Bolchi and Maurizio Galimberti for their special appearance and contribution.

No. 359

Spectra Workshop @ The Impossible Project NYC Space

Jon Campolo, | 1637 days ago

Sunday, April 15TH 2012
10AM - 1PM
The Impossible Project NYC Space
425 Broadway
Floor 5
New York
NY 10013

UPDATEWORKSHOP HAS BEEN CANCELLED! We apologize for any inconvenience.

Spring into the Magic of Spectra!

Continuing our Impossible Workshop series, we are pleased to announce the return of a classic workshop on one of our favorite cameras, the Spectra. The Impossible Project will hold a three hour interactive workshop on maximizing Impossible film in the Polaroid Spectra Camera.

In the workshop, participants will be guided through the ins and outs of the Polaroid Spectra series camera with a knowledgeable Impossible expert staffer. Workshop participants will learn introductory and intermediate techniques to master their Spectra camera including exposure, functionality, and accessories. The workshop will include an in depth overview of shooting Impossible Project film including light shielding and temperature control.

Workshop participants will be lead on an interactive photo walk with one of Impossible’s experienced staff photographers, capturing the photogenic charm of downtown New York as they explore SOHO, Chinatown, and Little Italy. The group will then reconvene back at the space to review images, ask questions and talk about image storage and preservation.

When: SUNDAY, APRIL 15, 2012, 10:00 AM to 1:00 PM
Where: Impossible Project Space, 425 Broadway, Floor 5, NYC 10013
Registration: (212) 219 3254 or nycspace@theimpossibleproject.com
Please notify when registering if renting a camera at no extra cost
Fee: $50 (price includes 1 pack PZ 680 Color Shade FF & Frog Tongue)

No. 360

Unfold It!

Frank Love | 1637 days ago

You will always hear “aahs” and “oohs” when unfolding any classic Polaroid folding SLR camera, revealing one of the most original and genius camera designs of all time. The SX-70 sports a chrome-plated plastic body and genuine leather accents as well as a 4-element 116mm f/8 glass lens, electronic shutter, a socket for flashbars or electronic flash units and a port for a remote shutter release. Enjoy the holy grail of analog instant photography and one of the most celebrated cameras in the history of photography – click here for more.

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No. 361

8 Exposures...with Emilie Lefellic.

Patrick Tobin, | 1637 days ago

Hi there. Welcome back to 8 Exposures, our instant film Q & A series! This week, we bring to you Parisian photog Emilie Lefellic

1) What kind of Polaroid camera(s) do you use?

Mainly my 180 and my SX70 model 2, which are my two favorite cameras.

2) Why do you like instant photography?

What I love about instant photography is its completely unpredictable character, the whimsical suprises it creates whenever you click the button. I also love the fact that development takes place before your eyes and you can even influence it once you know the film. As the awesome 101 Impossible Ways Project shows, instant photography leaves infinite room for experimentation and creativity – before, while and after the picture is taken : you can decide to double-expose, use special filters, put your picture in the fridge, in the oven, write, draw, paint, stick stuff on it, create artifacts with it – I actually feel a bit like a craftswoman when I fiddle with my pictures, which is a great source of joy. But what I love above all in instant photography is the instant film itself : its colour, depth, painterly texture, its retro feel – it alters reality in a way that is surreal, dreamy and poetical to me. Somehow, it’s perfect in its many imperfections.

3) What is your earliest memory of instant film?

My parents used to have a Polaroid 1000 Land Camera when I was a kid. It was a very basic camera, but it seemed magical to me, back then.

4) What’s your favorite Impossible film type?

I’ve had the immense honor of testing the very first generation of silver shade films by the Impossible Project back in February 2010. I am amazed at the progress Impossible has made since then – especially with the colour films, which have always been my favorite. My favorite so far has to be PX 680 FF, but I haven’t tested the new PX 70 film, which I’ve heard is even better. I also secretly hope that Impossible will come up with new peel-apart film some day, to replace 669 polaroid film.

5) What are your favorite subjects to photograph?

There are so many things I like and would like to shoot – I have a special fondness for women’s portraits, hats, dresses, flowers, clocks, Parisian streets and architecture, childhood, animals, tiny objects, lonely houses… I also love signs and everything that contains words and letters – graffiti, street names, notebooks… I love writing on my pictures, too.

6) Tell us about a project you’re working on.

I’m not working on any project right now, but there are lots of things I dream of doing. First, I’d love to find the time (and money, I guess) to set a proper shooting in a nice, refined place with a beautiful female model. I’ve never actually dared to hire someone but that’s something I’d like to do. I’d also love to go on working in collaboration with musicians – I’ve done a couple of band pictures / CD artworks and it’s been a great experience. I believe music and polaroids work very well together – I’ve edited a couple of music videos based on polaroids, and I’d love to do more of that, too. Finally, I hope to find the time to work on a new book of polaroids !

7) Who are your favorite photographers, instant or otherwise?

I don’t know a lot about photography and photographers, but I love the works of Miroslav Tichy, Sarah Moon, Wendy Beaver, Stefanie Schneider and Cathleen Naundorf, whose polaroids I discovered recently. I also love Andrei Tarkovski’s book of polaroids. But mostly, as far as instant photography is concerned, the work I enjoy the most is that of the amazing people I’ve met through Flickr and the likes – professional or amateurs, I don’t even know: people like Neil Krug, Parker Fitzgerald, Corinne Héraud, Mélanie Rodriguez, Franck Juery, The Gentleman Amateur, Eduardo Martinez, Ludwig West, Dan Ryan, Carmen Devos, Esther Z.Schnickenacke, Marion Lanciaux, Brian Henry, Bastian and Julia, Alix Berard (m6), and so many others I’m forgetting but whose work inspires me everyday…

8) If you could take a photo of anyone or anything what would it be?

I love the aesthetics of the Victorian period – for quite some time now, I’ve had this fantasy of shooting something 19th century-England with real costumes and settings, something romantic, Jane Campion / Emilie Brontë style. I’m not quite sure how to make this happen though :)

About Emilie

“I’m 32, I’m from Paris, I teach English and linguistics at university and I’ve been into Instant photography for about 5 years.”

Merci to Emilie for taking part in 8 Exposures! To purchase her book of instant film photographs, click HERE

No. 362

Holden x Impossible Cycle 2 Winners!

Jon Campolo, | 1636 days ago

Photo by Pierre Manning

Cycle 2 of the Holden x Impossible Timeless In An Instant photo contest has now ended.

The winners of round two were chosen by American photographer Angela Boatwright. Beginning her career by capturing the grittiness of the underground New York hardcore and skateboarding scenes in the early 90s, Angela’s profound passion for up-and-coming artists—backed by years of experience as a creative director and photo editor—result in her producing countless magazine features, special projects and art shows.

And the winners are…

TEA
by Pierre Manning
Film: PX 70 COLOR SHADE

From Angela: All of the images Pierre submitted are beautiful, but I chose this one as the clothing and the movements of the ladies really appeal to me. His most 80’s effected image – I’m obsessed with the 80’s.

And Runner Up:

SPITFIRE GIRL
by Menico Snider
Film: PX 680 COLOR SHADE GOLD EDITION

From Angela: Like Pierre’s images, there’s a mystery to this image – you can’t immediately tell how it was photographed. I really enjoy images that for whatever reason maintain your attention for more than 30 seconds. Both these shots have a lot of depth to them.

Congratulations to Pierre and Menico, each will receive an Impossible film pack and a Holden t-shirt!

Don’t miss your chance to win one of the bi-weekly prizes and become a winner of Cycle 3 – find all details & submit here

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No. 363

The Camera Museum: Polaroid "Red Stripe" One Step Flash

Patrick Tobin, | 1636 days ago

The Polaroid Red Stripe One Step Flash was first released in the early 1990s. It was similar in body style to Polaroid’s Sun 600 series but has a more advanced flash system with automatic charging, and a built-in sliding close-up lens.

The Red Stripe One Step Flash has a single-element 116mm plastic lens, fixed focus with a standard minimum focal length of 4 feet (2 feet when close-up lens is in place), electronic shutter, programmed auto-exposure system and a built-in flash.

The Red Stripe works with all of Impossible’s 600 film, which can be found HERE

To purchase your own Polaroid Red Stripe Camera Kit, click HERE

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No. 364

The Gentleman Amateur

Frank Love | 1635 days ago

1) The Gentleman Amateur

It was not only that name that made us curious about this photographer, but also his analog instant photography. The Gentleman Amateur is a London-based photographer and writer who remains committed to shooting instant film for as long as he possibly can.

About his favorite 7 Impossible shots he says: “I thinks that it’s fascinating to see the development of Impossible’s films through them, so here also is a key to the films they were shot with:
1) PX100 Silver Shade First Flush: “The very first film that Impossible released – it’s come such a long way since then, it’s hard to believe it’s only 2 years ago!
2) PX70 Color Shade First Flush: “The very first colour film.”
3, 4, 5) PX70 PUSH!: “Still my favourite, I think.”
6, 7) PX680 beta: “The strongest colours I’ve yet had from an Impossible film”

Click here to view more of his work.

Maggs Gallery London is currently showing his series London’s Lost Rivers until April 19.
That series of Polaroids is also published in the book London’s Lost Rivers, available from Strange Attractor Press

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No. 365

The 365 Project Book

Frank Love | 1634 days ago

The 365 Project is the new book by Polaroid aficianado Nathan Matos. This marks Matos’s second year of taking one Polaroid photo a day. While any photo-a-day project is impressive, going Polaroid for two years demonstrates major dedication. Using precious Impossible film means every shot matters. Not to slight iPhoneography, but shooting with this kind of stock means each shooting opportunity must be considered carefully. And even the best shot can have random distortions of color due to the continually evolving chemistry improvements from Impossible.

Check out a preview of The 365 Project here.
Pick up a copy of the book in the Blurb bookstore.
Visit Nathan’s website for fresh images every day.

No. 366

Dr. Love - The Importance of Being Shielded

Patrick Tobin, | 1633 days ago

Hello from Impossible! Dr. Love is back with another informative post in which he revisits the importance of shielding your images…

“Some people have asked some follow up questions to our Opacification post, and as the days are getting longer, we wanted to help stress the use of Impossible Films on those bright sunny summer days.

To simply summarize the main point from the opacification post, Impossible films are still sensitive to light in the first moments out of the camera. This is because the protective layer within the film that is there to protect the film can’t yet block out enough light in many situations that it needs an outside aide. (See photos below as examples of poorly-shielded and well-shielded images, respectively).

Depending on the camera you have, there are 3 very simple ways to protect your film in nearly every situation. If you have a standard ‘box type’ 600 or SX-70 camera (except One600 type), you can get a Frog Tongue and then you’ll never have to worry about whether you have a cover on your camera again. As well as a Frog tongue made for Spectra Cameras, this will always uncurl over the film keeping a good seal on it to help protect in even the brightest conditions like at the beach.

The next is if you have a folding camera like the Original SX-70s or an SLR 680, you can get the Impossible PX Shade, as this is similarly designed to keep close contact with the film frame as it is coming out of the camera to help prevent light from seeping in the sides and flash the film.

Lastly, if you’re in a pinch, every pack of film you start gives you a simple-to-use shade just from putting the pack in your camera, that of course is the dark slide. The dark slide is a black matte material that can be used is various ways depending on your camera type to help keep your film covered from strong light. To see an example of how to shield with a dark slide, watch this video

The main things to keep in mind are…
1. Film is most sensitive the first moment it starts to come out of the camera
2. The brighter your environment, the more of a need there is to shield and shield well
3. Even if in a darker space, remember that a long exposure with a little light can be the same as a quick exposure to bright light.

If you remember and apply these main points, you can’t go wrong, and using a Frog Tongue or PX Shade will let you shoot with more thought to your shot and less to how to handle it. Now get out there, enjoy the Spring, and happy shooting.

Keep your rollers clean,

-f

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No. 367

Factory Shots 2/8

Factory Team | 1633 days ago

Photo by Lia Sáile

2/8 The Offices Hallway

Each floor of Building North is divided into big production, assembly and storage halls as well as into areas where you can find our offices, meeting rooms, laboratories and cafeteria.

In between you will find these long corridors that we are passing over every day in order to get from one task to the other. There is so much space that we sometimes feel like dancing or skating! Join us in doing so on our next Open House day – presumably sometime in May!

8 Factory Shots will present one photo a week for eight weeks.

No. 368

Viewfinder: Paul Reitano at Reason Rally

Patrick Tobin, | 1632 days ago

Welcome back to Viewfinder, our series focusing on interesting projects and uses of Impossible film. This entry brings you Paul Reitano, who recently shot at the Reason Rally in Washington, D.C….

“Hey Polaroid nerds! I’m a wedding/portrait/event/whatever photographer that has begun incorporating polaroid and other film cameras into my work. I have gone through a steep learning curve with Impossible Project film, and finally, after much experimentation, arrived at the point where I can incorporate the film into a session and know I’m going to get unique and consistent results. I love the simplicity and elegance of the images that are created with my Spectra camera and Silver Shade film.

In this world gone mad with the exponential growth of digital technology (see Moore’s Law), I have found shooting on an instant camera and Impossible film to be a sacred act that serves as an antidote to needless complexity. Equal parts art and therapy, I love covering up my precious photos like Gollum and running off to hide them in the dark. (I also love the look you get from other photographers when you whip out your polaroid camera like some insane time-travelling dork from the 70’s who managed get a press pass.)

On Saturday, March 24th, I had the opportunity to shoot The Reason Rally in Washington, D.C. for the well known activist Margaret Downey and the Freethought Society.

While I used Nikon and Olympus as my primary digital tools, I also brought along my Spectra camera and two packs of IP film, hoping for a chance to grab some unique images. As Margaret had thoughtfully arranged a media pass for me, I knew my chances were good for an interesting perspective on the day’s events. Although I wasn’t really supposed to have stage access, I managed to look unassuming enough to weasel my way up there, and when the amazing Tim Minchin came on, I threw caution to the wind and got as close as I could to get some shots. At the end of his set, I asked him to take a polaroid portrait, and he happily obliged. I also managed to get a good shot of Richard Dawkins, who looked totally bewildered at the same request.

Polaroids and IP film are now a part of my look as I try to establish a unique presence in the wedding/portrait/event/whatever market.”

To see more of Paul’s work, please visit his blog at www.paulreitano.tumblr.com

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No. 369

Viewfinder: Patrick J. Clarke - "Searching for the Soul"

Patrick Tobin, | 1632 days ago

Welcome back to Viewfinder, our series highlighting interesting projects that incorporate Impossible Film. This week, we’re happy to bring you Temecula, California-based photographer Patrick J. Clarke

If the heart of photography is the camera, then film is its soul. Finding that unique combination of the perfect camera and perfect film is often a long process, and my current project is no different.

Early on in my exploration of film photography I was drawn towards medium format. With tons of resolving power, large negatives and amazing depth of field compared to other film formats, medium format cameras were like some sort of nirvana for me. When I purchased one of the all time medium format icons, the Mamiya RB67, I thought I had struck gold. I shot a few rolls of 120 film and was amazed at how technically perfect the camera and its lenses were. I could control the depth of field, the shutter speed and aperture exactly like I wanted. My exposures were dead on, and the images were sharp as I could want, and looked “medium format”, but they were lacking something. I wracked my brain and asked myself what were my shots missing?

They were lacking “soul”.

During this time I had also been shooting The Impossible Project Silver Shade film. I had purchased an SX-70 and had been having fun experimenting with it and the film. I loved my SX-70, but after using a camera that I had total control over, I was often frustrated when the shot wasn’t quite right due to its automatic exposure, or the depth of field wasn’t exactly what I had envisioned. When it worked though, I was amazed at what appeared in the frame. There was something unique in this film. It had something other film didn’t have. It had life to the images; a timeless quality to them, and most importantly, it had soul.

But I never put it together until just recently. Why not combine the technically perfect camera with this artistically fulfilling film?

I sat down with a frame of exposed Silver Shade and my Mamiya RB67 and tried to figure out how to put them together. After some trial and error I found a way to combine them. I extracted a frame of Silver Shade film out of the pack in total darkness and set it up locked in a Polaroid pack film back for the RB67. I set up a still life of my wife’s riding boots, removed the darkslide from the Mamiya and pressed the shutter.

I replaced the darkslide and took the Polaroid back off the camera and went back into the darkroom with a One600 and an empty pack of Silver Shade. Once again in total darkness, I gently reinserted my frame and put it the One600. With the familiar sound of ejecting film filling my ears, all I could do was wonder if it all worked.

To be honest, I didn’t want to turn over that first picture to see, but when I did, I knew I had found the soul for my camera. This project is the combination of my two loves: The beautiful medium format precision and sharpness of my Mamiya RB67 and the artistic and adventuresome Impossible Project film. With this combination, I’ve made the impossible, possible.

Thanks very much to Patrick for taking part in Viewfinder! To see more of his photography, visit http://lightsquared.tumblr.com/

13
No. 370

8 Exposures...with Bradley Laurent.

Patrick Tobin, | 1630 days ago

Greetings Impossibles, and welcome back to 8 Exposures, our weekly instant film Q&A series. This week, we happily present to you our interview with Californian adman and photographer Bradley Laurent

Q1) What kind of Polaroid camera(s) do you use?

A: Let’s see, I split my time pretty evenly between an SX-70, an SLR 680, a Spectra Pro, and an old Polaroid 100 Land Camera. I also have closet full of various 600 and Spectra series camera that I pick up at camera shows and thrift stores.

Q2) Why do you like instant photography?

A: Shooting with instant film has made me a better photographer. When I shoot with instant film, it forces me to really think about lighting and composition, much more so than when I shoot with a digital camera. Having only 8 shots in a pack of film forces you to make every shot count, and in turn, I find that the overall quality of my work improves each time I shoot. I also love the look of film in general. The Impossible films with all of their quirks and wonky-ness (is that a word) produce beautiful, one of a kind images, and I really enjoy the whole process that goes into getting just the right shot.

Q3) What is your earliest memory of instant film?

A: When I was 12 years old, we took a family trip to Maine, to visit my aunt and uncle. One evening after dinner, my uncle brought out an SX-70 and took some family pictures. It was the coolest thing I had ever seen. I still have one of those pictures.

Q4) What’s your favorite Impossible film type?

A: Currently it’s PX 70 Color Shade. I love the colors it produces, especially reds and blues. I’m also a fan of the PX 100 UV+ Silver Shade film. It’s great for black and white portraits.

Q5) What are your favorite subjects to photograph?

A: I really like shooting people. Los Angeles is a haven for actors, models, musicians and writers, and it’s overflowing with creative, interesting people who all want their picture taken. I started out doing mostly studio work, but these days I find myself shooting people in their own neighborhoods, on the street, rooftops, alleys, etc. It makes the pictures feel more “real” to me.

Q6) Tell us about a project you’re working on.

A: I’m excited to be working on a series of images that includes people, some of their personal items and Tibetan Buddhist Prayer Flags. It will be a little while before this project makes its public debut.

Q7) Who are your favorite photographers, instant or otherwise?

A: Oh, that a tough question. I’m a fan of many of the old LIFE magazine contributors, Philippe Halsman, W. Eugene Smith and Alfred Eisenstaedt just to name a few.

Q8) If you could take a photo of anyone or anything what would it be?

A: Here are my top 3 faces to photograph: Barack Obama, Zooey Deschanel and Adam Goldberg.

About Bradley

I moved to California from the east coast 9 years ago with my wife and 2 year old (at the time) son. I’ve been here long enough to call Los Angeles home. I work in advertising, and when I’m not stuck behind a desk you’ll probably find me wandering around Hollywood with a camera in my hand.

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No. 371

The Camera Museum: Polaroid SX-70 OneStep SE

Patrick Tobin, | 1629 days ago

Much like Polaroid’s “The Button”, the OneStep SE is identical in features to the original non-folding SX-70 “Rainbow” OneStep. The only difference is the color scheme. Instead of a white body, the OneStep SE is a shiny black, and the shutter release button is sky blue.

The OneStep SE’s rigid plastic body and fixed focus single element 103mm f/14.6 plastic lens made it a more affordable option than the folding SX-70 models.

The OneStep SE features an electronic shutter, programmed auto exposure and a socket for flashbars or electronic flash units.

The OneStep SE works with any of the Impossible Project SX-70 films, including PX 70 Color Shade film and PX 100 Silver Shade UV+ film

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No. 372

Submit your Image for the Dayripper

Frank Love | 1626 days ago

The dayripper is is a tear-off calendar and a magazine for your iphone. Transferring the classic calendar feeling to your contemporary mobile device, it’s packed with thoughts, words and pictures. Where one once found pearls of wisdom, dayripper now offers gems from literature, fashion, health, the arts and Impossible images!

You are invited to submit your favorite Impossible instant images. If selected it will be presented on an upcoming day of 2012 or 2013.

Please send your
-> favourite Impossible image scan, 300 dpi., jpg
-> your name and website
-> to mail@dayripper.info
Deadline of submission is June 15, 2012.
Please note that there will be no reimbursement for usage of your photo in dayripper.

Visit and download the dayripper here.

No. 373

ARTIST IN RESIDENCE: MOMENTUM'S BRIAN HENRY

Jon Campolo, | 1626 days ago

Photo by Brian Henry

MOMENTUM is currently on view at The Impossible Project NYC Space. This stunning exhibition of PX100 UV+ and PX70 materials includes some of the richest tones and sharpest contrast yet. For this installment of Artist in Residence, surrealist photographer Brian Henry has shared his experiences shooting these new batches of film, as well as his interpretation of the exhibition’s concept. Through a happy accident involving a faulty heater in a freezing basement and explorations in an abandoned hospital, Brian provides insight into his creative process and how unpredictable chance influenced the final images he submitted for MOMENTUM:

“My thought process began taking the theme ‘Momentum’ in a literal sense. I set up in my small studio space which is a small, strange storage room under my porch in the basement. It was freezing that week, so I decided to set up a heater among my landlord’s bookshelves stacked with high school memory books, fur coats and religious paintings. My eyesight is horrible which makes self-portraiture even more difficult, let alone working in a cluttered space. I tried to recreate some forceful waves of movement by setting up a series of moving wire arrangements and sculptures. I had myself wrapped in wire, partially blind, when the power went out due to the heater I was using. There I was in the dark basement, wrapped in wires, trying to find the breaker. Somehow I managed to get caught on a large bag of coat hangers my landlord is hoarding, and all I could do was tiptoe slowly with my eyes closed to prevent myself from poking my eyes out. Done. Later that day I decided to portray the momentum theme in a more symbolic and spiritual way. My cloaked ghost sending this force through the walls of an abandoned tuberculosis hospital. Bones freezing from the cold wind and doors slamming down the hall. I found it more difficult shooting the color shade film in the field. I am use to overexposing when working in abandoned spaces and letting the light bleed in, but it wasn’t working as I had hoped. Also, the film took a really long time to develop, even though it processed in my warm pocket, the full images did not show up until we had left the hospital. Of course then I see everything I wasn’t happy with and wish I could have done better. I must say however, that the tones of the Color Shade film are spectacular! Finally a bit of relief for those who had become attached to Polaroid’s Time-Zero film that was discontinued in 2006. I am extremely excited for the future of instant film and look forward to mastering the quirks of these odd films. If you have a chance, I encourage you to see the exhibit itself. The originals that are on display are amazing – the Silver Shade films appear semi-metallic and should really be admired in person, not only on a computer screen!”

To see more of Brian’s work, please visit his official website and Flickr photostream. Special thanks to Brian for sharing his story – stay tuned for the next installment of Artist in Residence!

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No. 374

Factory Shots 3/8

Factory Team | 1626 days ago

3/8 Ex-Polaroid colleagues

In former times about 1100 people used to work at the former Polaroid factory in Enschede. That was back then when around 65 Mio. Polaroid film packs were produced per year in Enschede only, and 130 million packs worldwide.

This whiteboard was used to divide the department’s team members to the different machines. All of the photos are still hanging on this wall, and the spirit of all those busy people is still around, inspiring our current Impossible tasks.

8 Factory Shots will present one photo a week for eight weeks.

No. 375

THE UNIQLO X IMPOSSIBLE T-SHIRT

Frank Love | 1625 days ago

Impossible is honored to be included in the UNIQLO Cooperate Collaboration Project T-Shirt series. Despite our youth as a company, we now join the ranks of premium worldwide brands like MoMA, Minox and MTV among many others.

UNIQLO is the leading worldwide apparel brand when it comes to the most refined, sophisticated and high quality limited edition T-Shirts. UNIQLO’s UT series features designs by inspiring artists, top designers, international musicians and a carefully hand selected premium choice of worldwide brands.

We are very happy to celebrate the worldwide T-Shirt launch by giving away free T-Shirts.

FREE T-SHIRT WITH YOUR ORDER
On all orders over 100 EUR I 129,99 USD
As long as supplies last.

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No. 376

Viewfinder: Peter Pawlowski's Instant Antarctica

Patrick Tobin, | 1625 days ago

Ahoy, Impossibles! Welcome back to Viewfinder, our blog series focusing on interesting projects involving instant film. This entry provides you with a glimpse of the landscape of Antarctica, through the lens of an instant camera wielded by Pittsburgh native Peter Pawlowski…

“My obsession with the polar environment has been with me since my childhood. An alien land of ice and rock, remote yet teeming with life, its inaccessibility haunted me and tempted my urge to explore.

The opportunity eventually presented itself for me to actually travel to such a magical place as Antarctica…and as for capturing its mystique, the adventure that is instant film photography seemed the perfect match.

The Antarctic environment is not the most conducive to shooting with instant film. Cold is the enemy of chemicals and batteries, wildlife is always on the move, and lack of a zoom lens means you always want to get closer, despite having to keep your distance.

But the landscape never disappointed, and time was always on my side. I was prepared with plenty of film, having devoted much of my luggage space to the project. Lots of practice with my cameras at home allowed me to focus on the shot, and I’m very happy with the results.

There’s something special about holding these photographs, in knowing that they are truly a product of the Antarctic environment. The magic of instant film allowed them to be exposed, developed and printed in the atmosphere and energy of the place, and each time I wrote on the back of them, the word “Antarctica”, I sensed the intimate connection that had been created.

I shot both integral (Impossible Project and Polaroid) and packfilm (Polaroid and Fuji) with a Polaroid SLR 680 and Polaroid Land Camera 360, capturing bleak mountain landscapes and penguins about their business, with the occasional human interruption.”

To see more of Peter’s Antarctica images, visit his Flickr Photoset and his site, Obscurophile.

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No. 377

The new COOL line of Impossible Film

Frank Love | 1624 days ago

We’re kicking things off in style in Spring 2012 with the inaugural launch of the new Impossible COOL film line. New Impossible films will from now on now be released bi-annually in spring and fall.

The SPRING 2012 COOL EDITION features all Impossible Color and Silver Shade film materials in their newest incarnations based on the latest findings and achievements in instant film development. The colors of this season are based on warm tones creating dreamy images, with Color Shade films producing true colors and Silver Shade films delivering classic black & white images.

Go to shop

Click for all details

No. 378

Analog Feedback Night @ The NYC Space

Jon Campolo, | 1623 days ago

Thursday, April 26, 2012
6:00 PM to 9:00 PM
The Impossible Project NYC Space

Let’s talk about PX, baby!

Tackling the Impossible takes time, dedication and expertise − and we can all get by with a little help from our friends. Come join in on the ever-growing Impossible community for our first ever Analog Feedback Night.

On April 26th, The Impossible Project NYC Space invites YOU to showcase your favorite Impossible images to knowledgeable peers and fellow enthusiasts. Spend the evening reviewing your work and getting feedback while making new analog-loving friends. This is your chance to connect with other artists and photographers involved in the instant film community!

The night will take place from 6-9pm in The Impossible Project NYC Space. Come with originals or digital files on a USB flash drive. Bring your friends!

When: Thursday, April 26, 2012, 6:00 PM to 9:00 PM
Where: Impossible Project Space, 425 Broadway, Floor 5, NYC 10013
Registration: (212) 219 3254 or nycspace@theimpossibleproject.com
FREE and open to the public

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No. 379

8 Exposures...with Lou Noble

Patrick Tobin, | 1623 days ago

Welcome back to 8 Exposures, our instant film Q&A series! This week, we bring you polaroid portrait wizard Lou Noble

Q1) What kind of Polaroid camera(s) do you use?

A: I use two Polaroid cameras, a Polaroid SLR 680 and an SX-70. I’ve got loads in my apartment, but they’re decorative more than anything else. I’ve gone through my packfilm period, my simple Polaroid period, used a Big Shot for a bit. But there’s just nothing like the SX-70 and its kin that fits me better, the amount of control I like, the quality I require, the form factor, hell, even the little noises the motors make in the SLR 680, that there is music to my ears.

Q2) Why do you like instant photography?

A: I love it because it’s utterly unique. Unique in the pictures that are created, in the interactions using such strange cameras creates between you and your subject, unique in the palette, in the creation of a physical artifact. I’ve been using Polaroid since 1996, it’s been with me for, well, for the majority of my life. Polaroid is responsible for my love of photography.

And it’s not really about film, it’s about Instant film. It’s about having it immediately, about creating this little piece of work that you made mere moments ago, and having it in your hands, showing the person you photographed what you saw, that this picture right here is how I see you.

Q3) What is your earliest memory of instant film?

A: I was around 18, found my mom’s Sun 600 in her closet, after reading about one in a Stephen King story. Used that thing for years, until it stopped working while at summer camp. Stopped working at just the right time, though. Jesus, writing that, I realized I’ve been shooting with instant film my entire adult life. Heavy.

Q4) What’s your favorite Impossible film type?

A: Tough one. My favorite type of Impossible film, so far, is the PX 680 FF. I’ve found it really consistent, I’m digging the way the colors change with the color temperature.

Q5) What are your favorite subjects to photograph?

A: People. Always. Only. With me, that’s what photography is for, it’s a way of getting to know people, connect with people. It’s an excuse to hang out with someone, to ask ‘em all sorts of questions, to investigate, interview, interact.

Q6) Tell us about a project you’re working on.

A: I’m currently finishing up a project on couples, a book I’ve been working on since last year. Went around the country last summer, interviewed and photographed dozens of couples about their relationships, why they work, how they deal with conflicts, how certain factors affect them. Hope to be finished in the next month or so!

Q7) Who are your favorite photographers, instant or otherwise?

A: In no particular order: Richard Avedon, Julia Galdo, Kevin Mason, Laura Taylor, Autumn De Wilde, Aaron Feaver, Martin Schoeller, Ian Broyles, Ryan McGinley, Annie Liebovitz. I adore the way each of them capture people, all vastly different, but all thoroughly engaging. They’ve all got styles that are very much their own, that I can pick out of a crowd of photos. That counts for a lot, in my book. Being able to bring your own personality to bear on a photograph in such a way that it’s your own, that in an artistic field that’s as crowded as photography you can stand out, that’s the ideal. That’s what these folks are able to do with aplomb. There’s lots of good photographers out there, lots of folks who can take a pretty picture, but these folks show me something about their subjects, show me something far richer than just a pretty picture.

I like lots of of photographers, but these folks, hands down, all-time favorites.

Q8) If you could take a photo of anyone or anything what would it be?

A: President Obama. Or my grandfather, who passed away about sixteen years ago. He was a photographer, never got to see me pick it up.

About Lou

“I was born, raised and hope to one day die in Los Angeles. I work as a set medic.”

Special thanks to Lou for taking part in 8 Exposures. To see more of his work, please visit his site, www.louobedlam.com

No. 380

PX 680 COOL by the Impossible Pioneers

Frank Love | 1623 days ago

PX 680 COOL by James Matthew Carroll

Having discovered all Impossible aspects from the very start, the Impossible Pioneers are the first ones who get to test new film materials. End of March the pioneers were able to get their hands on the new PX 680 Color Shade film – which has now been released in the new Impossible COOL film line.
We are herewith proud to present the 5 winner images taken on PX 680 Color Shade COOL film by the Impossible Pioneers Abe Bingham, Ben Innocent, Celina Wyss, James Matthew Carroll and Lisa Duran.

Their feedback upon testing the new PX 680 COOL film?
Lisa said: “Beautifully softened tones in shadowed areas.”
Ben thinks: “A real joy to shoot. Well done Impossible! Less snakeskin and no divots with the SLR680.”
And James summarizes: “ This new PX 680 film is another brilliant impossible step forward. The fine, crisp detail is a great improvement, and the true vibrant colours are so amazing that these scans can’t do the original justice.”

Get the new PX 680 Color Shade COOL film here!

Want to become an Impossible Pioneer too? Show your pioneer spirit by buying a total of 30 films packs in any combination of our PX 70 or PX 600 Old Generation Film Bags

No. 381

HOLDEN X IMPOSSIBLE CYCLE 3 WINNERS!

Jon Campolo, | 1622 days ago

Photo by Andrew Millar

Cycle 3 of the Holden x Impossible Timeless In An Instant photo contest has ended.

The winners of round three were chosen by American photographer Brandon Long. A man of few words, Brandon visually communicates his manifesto through his unending work exclusively on instant film: The Only Magic Left is Art and Nothing on Earth Can Hold it as Prisoner.

And the winner is…

FADE AWAY
by Andrew Millar
Film: PX 70 COLOR SHADE

And Runner Up:

BECAUSE I CANNOT DEDICATE MYSELF TO ANY FELLOW BEING.”
by Amanda Jasnowski
Film: PX 70 COLOR SHADE

From Brandon: “What I liked specifically about these two are that they are the perfect balance of technique and creativity. Andrew Miller’s butterfly double exposure on an SX-70 alone is pretty difficult to pull off, but to make it look this good, only someone with vision could do it. Amanda equally so, taking close up self-portraits with a polaroid is no easy task. Especially having it come off as balanced as it did. Topping it off with a flare of emotional ambiguity and intrigue. Great job on both accounts, guys.”

Congratulations to Andrew and Amanda, each will receive an Impossible film pack and a Holden t-shirt!

Don’t miss your chance to win one of the bi-weekly prizes and become a winner of Cycle 4 – SUBMIT HERE and best of luck!

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No. 382

The Camera Museum: Polaroid Sun 660 AF

Patrick Tobin, | 1622 days ago

The Polaroid Sun 660 Autofocus camera was first released in 1981. It is similar in style to the earlier 600 cameras, with a rigid plastic body, but the Sun 660 utilizes Polaroid’s patented Sonar Autofocus technology. The distance to the subject is calculated by firing a high-frequency sound wave that bounces back to a gold-colored receiver beside the lens. The minimum focal length for the Sun 660 is 3 feet.

The Sun 660 features a single-element 116mm, f/11 plastic lens, electronic shutter, built-in flash and Polaroid’s Light Management System, allowing the user to make exposure adjustments via a lighten/darken switch under the lens.

The Polaroid Sun 660 works with any of Impossible’s 600-series film. For a complete selection of compatible films, click HERE

To buy a Sun 660 camera kit for yourself, click HERE

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No. 383

MORE LOVE FROM ACE HOTEL!

Jon Campolo, | 1621 days ago

Photo by Jessica Reinhardt

Alongside our exhibition with ACE Hotels in NYC and our Limited Edition PX 600 Silver Shade UV+ film, ACE has been hosting an online photo contest, selecting new winners every month! ACE is collecting submissions of YOUR Impossible images in an ever-growing gallery located online at acehotel.com/impossible. ACE’s panel of romantics and analog enthusiasts will curate a physical gallery show at Ace Hotel New York this Fall, exhibiting selected shots from the contest.

Congratulations to Jessica Reinhardt, Jason Benning and Demian Jacob Mendes – the most recent selected photographers of the ACE contest!

Check out ACE’s gallery and pick your favorite images or submit your own for a chance to win and be featured. Good luck!

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No. 384

Peter Lewis: The Camera

Frank Love | 1619 days ago

The Camera is a beautiful 7-minute-long short film by amateur filmmaker Peter Lewis about a solitary girl who finds a creepy mysterious Polaroid camera in an abandoned beach house. It’s the first film Lewis has completed, he singlehandedly managed all the stages of production, including composing the original score, creating the foley sounds, and editing the film in Final Cut Pro X.

No. 385

Dr. Love's Tips - The Long Exposure

Patrick Tobin, | 1619 days ago

Hello, Impossibles! Welcome back to the wonderful world of Dr. Love. Today’s topic is one that has been requested a few times: The Long Exposure

Some people have written in either having issues with blurry images and not understanding why they were getting them, or simply asking how to make a good long exposure with Polaroid cameras.

Before you attempt this, you must understand the concept of a long exposure. When the camera is exposing the film, moving the camera can cause a motion blur. When in well-lit conditions, the exposure is so short that little movements have no effect. In lower light however, you need to be more careful, especially with SX-70s, because of the slower speed of the film.

First you need to know your camera. The easiest rule to know is that if you’re using one of the many types of standard 600 plastic box cameras, the longest exposure the camera allows is 1/4 second. This is meant to help prevent blurry images in general, but would also make trying to take a shot at night w/o flash very hard as it would be too dark.

Using an SX-70 camera or a Spectra camera, one can get longer exposures, up to a few seconds. The exact maximum can vary on specific models. First of all, this means if you’re shooting in low light, you need to be sure to steady your camera, as you will likely have a blurry image otherwise. Bracing yourself and/or your camera against a stationary object as well as holding your breath the moment you take the shot are easy and simple ways to do this, and of course using a tripod is the most reliable.

If you’re looking to take extended exposures, say at night, you can try tricking your camera in a couple ways. First you can either block the light meter with your finger, or simply tape something opaque over it, and this will result in maximum exposure so that any nearby bright lights will blow out and perhaps it will better expose your nightscape. The other trick, though a little more difficult, is you can try opening the camera door mid-exposure, this effectively turns your camera off with the shutter open exposing your film. The trick to this technique is being fast and steady, so as to open the door after the shutter has opened, but before it is trying to close, and not shaking the camera too much in the process. The advantage to this trick is you can take extended exposures in very dark settings. To finish the exposure, typically just closing the door and another press on the shutter button should finish the cycle as normal. Fair warning that this technique is not guaranteed to be consistent and you shouldn’t do it if you’re not comfortable with it, but it can produce very cool images.

In general, just remember that until you hear the motor run to eject the frame, the camera is still exposing, so keep your camera steady.

As always, keep your rollers clean,

-f

If you have a topic you’d like Dr. Love to cover, please email usa@theimpossibleproject.com

No. 386

Traces of Time @ The Impossible Project NYC Space

Jon Campolo | 1619 days ago

THURSDAY MAY 3RD, 2012
6PM-9PM
The Impossible Project NYC Space
Photo by Varial & Nadjari

A Photographic Journey with the Afghan Pamiris

During July and August 2011, childhood friends and photographers Varial and Fabrice Nadjari traveled by foot to the North-Eastern part of Afghanistan armed with Polaroid cameras, Impossible films and solar powered scanners.

In the remote village of Kash Goz, they photographed mischievous Ismaili children, housewives, opium smokers, village chiefs and peasants. Each subject received their own portrait as a gift from the artists.

These portraits are what makes up “Traces of Time,” opening at The Impossible Project Space NYC alongside a video presentation of the artists’ journey from May 3 to June 3 2012 and on www.the-impossible-project.com. The opening reception will take place in presence of the artists with DJs and refreshments.

For more information about the artists’ experience, check out the story on The New York Times LENS blog or listen to their interview on NPR!

WHEN: THURSDAY MAY 3RD, 2012, 6PM-9PM
WHERE: Impossible Project NYC Space, 425 Broadway, Floor 5, NYC 10013
RSVP: rsvp@theimpossibleproject.com or call (212) 219-3254
OPEN HOURS: Mon–Fri 11am–7pm and Weekends 12pm–6pm
For further information, please visit the exhibition site.

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No. 387

Factory Shots 4/8

Factory Team | 1619 days ago

Photo by Lia Sáile

The Chemical Lab

This is the place were the Impossible chief chemist Martin Steinmeijer and its small team of experts and helpers is performing magic, developing new recipes and formulas, creating thousand of the so-called lab-spreads and testing the new inventions.

Instant film is the challenging combination of Negative sheet, Positive sheet and developer paste. In the chemical lab different paste formulations are made, tested, discarded, invented. We search for the best formulation to get the right colors for given sheet and negative, and we work on improving the whole photographic performance.

8 Factory Shots will present one photo a week for eight weeks.

No. 388

Impossible Project Space Vienna OPENING

Sarah Jungreithmayr | 1618 days ago

After our last Vienna location has become too small to celebrate all aspects of the Impossible world and to host the workshops and exhibitions, we are happy to announce the opening of the new Impossible Project Space Vienna location.

A bright and glorious new place, Vintage style with many lovely details, presenting everything Impossible as well as ongoing new exhibitions and workshops is awaiting its visitors – as well as a small but beautiful garden in the courtyard.

Check it out!

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No. 389

Viewfinder: THE FIELD RECORDINGS

Patrick Tobin, | 1618 days ago

Hi again, Viewfinder viewers. Welcome back to our series focusing on interesting and creative projects that incorporate Impossible film. This week, we bring you Connecticut Noise-Pop/Neu Wave band The Field Recordings, who have put together a limited edition Album/Photobook containing Impossible images…

“So this book is part of a Limited Edition of our first album, THE ELASTIC NOSTALGIA. The First Printing is 100 hand-numbered copies (50 with a CD / 50 with a Cassette) we’re self-releasing for Record Store Day.

The book is kind of a play on our name—what would a bunch of Field Anthropologists or Hobby Scientists use to make reports from the field? An old Polaroid camera, a label maker & a typewriter… So this is supposed to be their documentation of whatever it is they’ve seen. The lyrics are transcribed like they were overheard, the instant photos, the footnotes are their analyses… The idea came to me a year ago as we were finishing up the recording. And then I just wrote down a bunch of loose general phrases that I thought related to each song, like EMPTY HOUSES, HANDS WRINGING, 1951, HUMAN CIRCUITRY/ACTUAL CIRCUITRY, ARROGANCE, that kind of thing, and gave the list to my drummer (Jared Thompson, he took photos 1d, 3a, 5c, 6d, & 9d). And then I just carried my 680 or sx-70 or Spectra around wherever I went for the next 8 or 9 months, looking for things that matched whatever I’d written in my notebook.

I wanted to use Impossible Film because I would always rather make things by hand. Digital text, digital recording, digital art… I just feel like I’m actually making something if I have to wrestle with it, not just move it around 1 degree detached from it on a computer. I feel like you can trust me if you know that what you’re seeing actually exists. The best thing about Impossible Film is that whatever comes out of the camera isn’t the real world—the best photos I’ve taken have the exaggeration of memory in them. The colors are brighter or stranger, the people in the frame are more dramatic & shadowed…”

DANIEL / THE FIELD RECORDINGS.

Thanks to THE FIELD RECORDINGS for taking part in Viewfinder. To purchase their album, please visit thefieldrecorders.bandcamp.com. Also make sure to check out their Facebook page and follow them on Twitter at @FIELDRECORDERS

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No. 390

Open House Enschede

Factory Team | 1617 days ago

MAR 11, 2012
Impossible Factory
Enschede
The Netherlands
Photo by Christian Reichhold

We are happy to once more open the doors of our Impossible Factory in Enschede, The Netherlands, and give you a chance to see where all the Impossible work and development is taking place.

Dive into the analog spirit on site, the machines, the factory outlet and some members of the team!

We usually get many more requests than we have available places. Therefore we are introducing a new registration process, starting with your application.

APPLY UNTIL MAY 1>

You can also discover the Impossible Factory here>

The Factory Team is also contributing to the blog>

No. 391

PZ 600 Silver Shade COOL

Frank Love | 1616 days ago

Following last week’s introduction of the new Impossible standard COOL Edition films, we are proud to now also release a new film for the larger Polaroid Image/Spectra system: the PZ 600 Silver Shade COOL film.

This film is made possible by the constant evolution of Impossible film development, incorporating the latest achievements and findings, producing the coolest Image/Spectra photos ever. This new film features a faster image development, more consistent image results and reduced artifacts such as mottling in dark image areas, spots or blemishes.

Go to Shop

No. 392

MAURIZIO GALIMBERTI ARTIST TALK & WORKSHOP @ THE NYC SPACE

Jon Campolo | 1616 days ago

Saturday & Sunday, May 5 & 6
Sat 6-8PM & Sun 10AM-1PM
The Impossible Project NYC Space

Italian photographer Maurizio Galimberti has been working with Polaroid film since the early 90s, but has now adapted his techniques to incorporate new Impossible film materials. Maurizio uses instant photographs to create stunning multi dimensional mosaics, consisting of up to 140 individual images, capturing personalities like Johnny Depp, George Clooney and Sofia Coppola among many others.

The Impossible Project NYC Space is proud to offer TWO special events lead by Maurizio Galimberti in early May. During his very special visit to New York, Maurizio will share his experiences and thoughts on the instant analog medium and on the transition from Polaroid to Impossible films. Participants in this very rare workshop will have the opportunity to ask Maurizio all their artistic and technical questions, and also get an exclusive look into his signature techniques and observations using Impossible films.

Don’t miss this rare opportunity to learn from a master of instant photography, and RSVP today!

Maurizio Galimberti Meet & Greet

WHEN: Saturday, May 5 from 6PM to 8PM
WHERE: Impossible Project Space NYC 425 Broadway, 5th Floor between Howard & Canal Streets
REGISTRATION: Email nycspace@theimpossibleproject.com or call +1 212 219 3254
FREE and open to the public!

Maurizio Galimberti’s Techniques Workshop

WHEN: Sunday, May 6 from 10AM to 1PM
WHERE: Impossible Project Space NYC 425 Broadway, 5th Floor between Howard & Canal Streets
REGISTRATION: Email nycspace@theimpossibleproject.com or call +1 212 219 3254
FEE: $199.99 (price includes all film and tools necessary for the workshop)

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No. 393

8 Exposures...with Sarah Kirkham

Patrick Tobin, | 1616 days ago

Hello, fellow shooters. Welcome back to 8 Exposures, our weekly Q&A series focusing on instant film. This week’s entry brings you Sarah Kirkham

Q1) What kind of Polaroid camera(s) do you use?

A: The SX-70 is my camera of choice. I am embarrassed to admit that I have broken several through various catastrophes. I have quite the collection of broken cameras.

Q2) Why do you like instant photography?

A: There is just magic in that chemical process happening right there in my hand or back pocket as the case may be. That process imparts something beautiful to each image that wouldn’t be there otherwise. Every shot I take leaves me giddy. Even now I’m constantly trying to peek at the image as it develops.

Q3) what is your earliest memory of instant film?

A: We were one of the few families that didn’t have a Polaroid camera in the house when I was growing up. My first real experience with instant cameras and film was as a teacher. The school found a few One Steps and some 600 film. We would take very uninspired, poorly-lit photos of the children to send home. I am horrified to think of how we blew through what would have been a fortune in film. My real love for it came when I realized I kept coming back to certain images and they were all on instant film.

Q4) What’s your favorite Impossible film type?

A: My favorite impossible film right now is PX 70. Although my all time favorite film was PX 70 FF. The tones were so soft and gorgeous. I miss that film.

Q5) What are your favorite subjects to photograph?

A: I don’t know that I have a favorite subject to photograph. The images I take are moments stolen in my everyday life. In many ways each one is a glimpse into my world. I try to take those moments and show the beauty that can be found there. Although I am obsessed with sun flare and light leaks are always welcome.

Q6) Tell us about a project you’re working on.

A: I just completed a little book project P is for Polaroid: an instant alphabet. After finishing it I find I’m dragging my feet a bit. I am currently procrastinating work on two projects. I’m still digging around for inspiration. I would love a chance to collaborate with other photographers.

Q7) Who are your favorite photographers, instant or otherwise?

A: The honest truth is I am inspired everyday by the amazing photographers I see in the instant groups on Flickr. There are so many photographers in those groups I admire and I am so grateful that they take the time to share their work. There isn’t a day that goes by that I don’t see an image that just blows my mind.

Q8) If you could take an photo of anyone or anything what would it be?

A: I sometimes dream of traveling to exotic locations or time traveling back to my twenties. Ultimately I would have liked to have photographed both of my grandfathers. They led very different lives but were both devoted to their families, kind and generous. Their own quiet tales were often overshadowed by the more boisterous women in their families. I would have liked to have captured a little of their stories on film.

About Sarah

I live on the east coast with my husband, two kids, a cat and Mike the Beagle. I am fairly obsessed with instant photography.

To see more of Sarah’s photography, please visit her Flickr Photostream and be sure to follow her on Twitter at @petitgris_

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No. 394

The Camera Museum: Polaroid SX-70 Sonar OneStep

Patrick Tobin, | 1615 days ago

As many consumers had difficulty focusing with their original SX-70s, Polaroid released an autofocus model of their folding SX-70 in 1978. The SX-70 Sonar OneStep utilized a new and very advanced sonar technology. When the shutter button is pressed halfway, a series of ultrasonic chirps is emitted from an electrostatic transducer located under a plate over the lens. These chirps travel to the subject and bounce back to the camera’s receiver, alerting the camera to the subject’s distance, and the lens is turned on a motor to focus accordingly.

The Polaroid SX-70 Sonar OneStep features a 4-element 116mm glass lens, manual or autofocus capabilities, with a minimum focal length of 10.4 inches, electronic shutter, programmed automatic exposure and a socket for flashbars or electronic flashes. Another nice feature is a socket for an electrically-actuated remote shutter release.

The SX-70 Sonar OneStep works with all of Impossible’s SX-70 films, which can be purchased HERE

To purchase your own SX-70 Sonar OneStep Camera Kit, click HERE

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No. 395

The Camera Museum: Polaroid OneStep 600 Talking Camera

Patrick Tobin, | 1614 days ago

In 1997, Polaroid released possibly their most gimmicky camera: The OneStep 600 Talking Camera. The camera came with several pre-recorded messages, and could also be used to record speech (or music) which is played via a loudspeaker just before taking your photo. The sound effects can be switched off completely if preferred, which you very well may. The pre-recorded messages apparently vary according to the territory the camera was marketed in, and include American and Spanish versions. The US version’s pre-recorded messages include, “Smile, you funny person!” and “Cheese for me, cheese for you, everybody cheese-a-roo!”

Aside from the talking capabilities, the OneStep Talking Camera functions identically to the OneStep CloseUp camera. It features a single-element 116mm plastic lens, fixed focus with a minimum focal length of 4 feet (2 feet with the sliding close-up lens in place), electronic shutter, programmed automatic exposure with a sliding exposure compensation dial and built-in electronic flash.

The OneStep Talking Camera works with all of Impossible’s 600 film. For a complete selection of compatible films, please click HERE

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No. 396

ARTIST IN RESIDENCE: MOMENTUM'S THOM JACKSON

Jon Campolo | 1612 days ago

Photo by Thom Jackson

For this installment of Artist in Residence, Thom Jackson shares his experience shooting with PX100 and PX70 for MOMENTUM, an exhibition currently on view on the North wall at The Impossible Project NYC Space. Interested in the instant image as a tangible object, Thom explains his struggle with lighting for an unknown emulsion, and giving in to the element of surprise:

“In my commercial work I shoot fashion and stills. I shoot digital everyday but use archival inkjet or platinum/palladium for my fine art work that I print myself. I appreciate that an Impossible print is something tangible you can touch, feel, and hold. In an age of endless digital copies it’s exciting to actually shoot something that is one of a kind.

The biggest challenge was lighting for the new beta films, PX-100 Silver Shade and PX-70 Color Shade, and determining the correct exposure since it was a new emulsion. I was curious to see how the film adapted to both the still shoot and the fashion shoot.

I lit both with a constant light source so I could use my Option 8 modified camera and also my vintage SX-70. Unlike traditional Polaroid, the Option 8 doesn’t have a mirror so all of the images were reversed. This reversal of the graffiti letters on the wall ultimately encouraged the feeling of momentum in the final piece.

The unpredictable and constantly surprising results from The Impossible Films are what make each image a unique experience.

I owe a debt of gratitude to stylist Jay Evers for the still shoot that is a continuation of a series that is currently showing at Craighead Green Gallery in Dallas. Thank you also to Jon Tutolo for his styling of the model. And thank you to Sergio Garcia for effortlessly creating the perfect graffiti wall.”

To view more of Thom’s work, please visit his official website. Thanks to Thom for sharing – stay tuned for the next installment of Artist in Residence!

No. 397

Upcoming Events @ The NYC Space - MAY 2012

Jon Campolo | 1612 days ago

As The Impossible Project NYC Space gears up for another busy month, we invite you to all of the following events! This Thursday come celebrate the imaginative approach of Impossible explorers Varial and Fabrice Nadjari with the opening of Traces of Time, then follow up on their adventure at their Artist Talk later in the month. Don’t miss the rare and special duo of events with Italian maestro Maurizio Galimberti, and practice honing your skills with a classic camera at our upcoming SX-70 Workshop. Come and experience these very special events for yourself, or bring some friends to everything happening this month at the NYC Space!

Traces of Time
Thursday, May 3rd, 2012
Opening Reception 6-9PM
Featured in NY Times’ LENS Blog and on NPR, Varial & Nadjari present their incredible collection of Impossible instant portraits from their timeless travels through Kash Goz, Afganistan, alongside a video installation.
More info here

Maurizio Galimberti Meet & Greet
Saturday, May 5th, 2012
6-8PM
Hear directly from a master of instant manipulation and collage at this intimate event. Maurizio will share experiences and thoughts on the analog instant medium and his transition from Polaroid to Impossible films.
More info here

Maurizio Galimberti Techniques Workshop
Saturday, May 6th, 2012
10AM-1PM
World renowned photographer Maurizio Galimerti will teach his signature manipulation and collage techniques at this unique workshop. Be part of a rare opportunity to learn from one of the instant film greats!
More info here

SX-70 Workshop
Saturday, May 20th, 2012
10AM-1PM
This fully interactive workshop will explore the features of the SX-70 camera, while focusing on shooting techniques and achieving the best out of the Impossible Project film range.
More info here

Work In Progress
Ongoing through May 3rd, 2012
From the vaults of Impossible history we are showcasing originals from the experts: our talented and knowledgeable staff. Many members have seen every variation and test version of all twelve distinct batches of film!
More info here

Momentum
Ongoing through late June, 2012
Celebrating how far we’ve come, twelve carefully selected photographers illustrate a MOMENTUM that will carry analog instant photography through the digital age and beyond.
More info here

No. 392

MAURIZIO GALIMBERTI ARTIST TALK & WORKSHOP @ THE NYC SPACE

Jon Campolo | 1616 days ago

Saturday & Sunday, May 5 & 6
Sat 6-8PM & Sun 10AM-1PM
The Impossible Project NYC Space

Italian photographer Maurizio Galimberti has been working with Polaroid film since the early 90s, but has now adapted his techniques to incorporate new Impossible film materials. Maurizio uses instant photographs to create stunning multi dimensional mosaics, consisting of up to 140 individual images, capturing personalities like Johnny Depp, George Clooney and Sofia Coppola among many others.

The Impossible Project NYC Space is proud to offer TWO special events lead by Maurizio Galimberti in early May. During his very special visit to New York, Maurizio will share his experiences and thoughts on the instant analog medium and on the transition from Polaroid to Impossible films. Participants in this very rare workshop will have the opportunity to ask Maurizio all their artistic and technical questions, and also get an exclusive look into his signature techniques and observations using Impossible films.

Don’t miss this rare opportunity to learn from a master of instant photography, and RSVP today!

Maurizio Galimberti Meet & Greet

WHEN: Saturday, May 5 from 6PM to 8PM
WHERE: Impossible Project Space NYC 425 Broadway, 5th Floor between Howard & Canal Streets
REGISTRATION: Email nycspace@theimpossibleproject.com or call +1 212 219 3254
FREE and open to the public!

Maurizio Galimberti’s Techniques Workshop

WHEN: Sunday, May 6 from 10AM to 1PM
WHERE: Impossible Project Space NYC 425 Broadway, 5th Floor between Howard & Canal Streets
REGISTRATION: Email nycspace@theimpossibleproject.com or call +1 212 219 3254
FEE: $199.99 (price includes all film and tools necessary for the workshop)

No. 390

Open House Enschede

Factory Team | 1617 days ago

MAR 11, 2012
Impossible Factory
Enschede
The Netherlands
Photo by Christian Reichhold

We are happy to once more open the doors of our Impossible Factory in Enschede, The Netherlands, and give you a chance to see where all the Impossible work and development is taking place.

Dive into the analog spirit on site, the machines, the factory outlet and some members of the team!

We usually get many more requests than we have available places. Therefore we are introducing a new registration process, starting with your application.

APPLY UNTIL MAY 1>

You can also discover the Impossible Factory here>

The Factory Team is also contributing to the blog>

No. 388

Impossible Project Space Vienna OPENING

Sarah Jungreithmayr | 1618 days ago

After our last Vienna location has become too small to celebrate all aspects of the Impossible world and to host the workshops and exhibitions, we are happy to announce the opening of the new Impossible Project Space Vienna location.

A bright and glorious new place, Vintage style with many lovely details, presenting everything Impossible as well as ongoing new exhibitions and workshops is awaiting its visitors – as well as a small but beautiful garden in the courtyard.

Check it out!

No. 386

Traces of Time @ The Impossible Project NYC Space

Jon Campolo | 1619 days ago

THURSDAY MAY 3RD, 2012
6PM-9PM
The Impossible Project NYC Space
Photo by Varial & Nadjari

A Photographic Journey with the Afghan Pamiris

During July and August 2011, childhood friends and photographers Varial and Fabrice Nadjari traveled by foot to the North-Eastern part of Afghanistan armed with Polaroid cameras, Impossible films and solar powered scanners.

In the remote village of Kash Goz, they photographed mischievous Ismaili children, housewives, opium smokers, village chiefs and peasants. Each subject received their own portrait as a gift from the artists.

These portraits are what makes up “Traces of Time,” opening at The Impossible Project Space NYC alongside a video presentation of the artists’ journey from May 3 to June 3 2012 and on www.the-impossible-project.com. The opening reception will take place in presence of the artists with DJs and refreshments.

For more information about the artists’ experience, check out the story on The New York Times LENS blog or listen to their interview on NPR!

WHEN: THURSDAY MAY 3RD, 2012, 6PM-9PM
WHERE: Impossible Project NYC Space, 425 Broadway, Floor 5, NYC 10013
RSVP: rsvp@theimpossibleproject.com or call (212) 219-3254
OPEN HOURS: Mon–Fri 11am–7pm and Weekends 12pm–6pm
For further information, please visit the exhibition site.

No. 378

Analog Feedback Night @ The NYC Space

Jon Campolo, | 1623 days ago

Thursday, April 26, 2012
6:00 PM to 9:00 PM
The Impossible Project NYC Space

Let’s talk about PX, baby!

Tackling the Impossible takes time, dedication and expertise − and we can all get by with a little help from our friends. Come join in on the ever-growing Impossible community for our first ever Analog Feedback Night.

On April 26th, The Impossible Project NYC Space invites YOU to showcase your favorite Impossible images to knowledgeable peers and fellow enthusiasts. Spend the evening reviewing your work and getting feedback while making new analog-loving friends. This is your chance to connect with other artists and photographers involved in the instant film community!

The night will take place from 6-9pm in The Impossible Project NYC Space. Come with originals or digital files on a USB flash drive. Bring your friends!

When: Thursday, April 26, 2012, 6:00 PM to 9:00 PM
Where: Impossible Project Space, 425 Broadway, Floor 5, NYC 10013
Registration: (212) 219 3254 or nycspace@theimpossibleproject.com
FREE and open to the public