May 2012

1
No. 398

Factory Shots 5/8

Factory Team | 1579 days ago

Photo by Lia Sáile

The Reactor

This image shows our reactor wherein we mix the chemical paste when we are moving the film’s paste from laboratory samples onto a larger production scale.

The developer used in instant film is a viscous liquid, and all ingredients are mixed in this reactor under controlled conditions. The developer is oxidation sensitive; air is removed using a vacuum. The reactor is purged with nitrogen when chemicals are added, to prevent air coming in. Never operate this machine without protective clothes…!

This is one of our oldest and legendary, and for sure most important machines when it comes to producing new instant films.

8 Factory Shots will present one photo a week for eight weeks.

No. 399

Time Zero Film Premiere!

Patrick Tobin, | 1579 days ago

This past weekend, the Impossible US team traveled to Massachusetts, the birthplace of Polaroid, for the premiere of Grant Hamilton’s documentary Time Zero: The Last Year of Polaroid Film.

The film debuted as part of the Independent Film Festival Boston at the famous Somerville Theatre. On hand were Mr. Grant Hamilton himself and some of the cast and crew, including Tod Brilliant, Sean Tubridy, Dan Weissman, Jackie Neal Chadwick, our own Dave Bias and Polaroid legend Paul Giambarba.

Please enjoy these photos, taken with PX 70 film, PX 600 Cool film and Instagram.

To watch the trailer for Time Zero, click HERE

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No. 400

Opening - Project Space Paris

Frank Love | 1578 days ago

May 3, 7 pm
Impossible Project Space Paris
77
rue Charlot
75003 Paris
France

The city of lights finally sees the Impossible daylight! What has once upon a time started in a small office in the Neutorgasse in heart of Vienna is growing and expanding faster than we could ever have dreamed of. With incredible pride and joy we are after New York City, Vienna and Tokyo presenting the newest addition to the Impossible Project Space network:

May 3 will see a glamourous Opening Party that will bath Paris in an analog ecstasy and make the French capital a new center of analog instant photography. There will be beer, karaoke and DJ Boris Gagarine – don’t miss it!

Befriend Impossible Paris on Facebook!

Celebrate & get PX 680 Cool Paris Edition feat. a 5,- Euro off Coupon!

No. 401

Viewfinder: James Erin de Jauregui

Patrick Tobin, | 1578 days ago

Hello, friends. Welcome back to Viewfinder, our feature celebrating interesting projects that incorporate Impossible film. This week, we bring you photographer and new father James Erin de Jauregui

“Shortly before my daughter was born, I began thinking of a personal project that I could do with her. Being a photographer, taking pictures of her was a given. So, I began to think of how I could challenge myself. I knew that I wanted to do something that wouldn’t be easy and would have lots of options to be displayed in a possible final art piece.

With that in mind, I decided that I would try my best to take at least one Polaroid of her a day. From there, I decided to limit myself to only SX-70 cameras. I do have a Polaroid 600 SE, a Spectra camera, a couple of folding Land Cameras, Polaroid backs for medium format cameras and a 4×5. I could try to utilize them all, but keeping this project to just integral film would give me a consistently-sized medium. Plus, the folding SX-70 is a great camera that can be taken anywhere without being cumbersome.

Another reason I choose to use Impossible Project film is because I really wanted this medium to work. Being born in the late 70s, it was easy to take Polaroid for granted. They were always there and available just about everywhere. Polaroid film was one of those items that you just never thought would be gone. However, when Polaroid ceased production in 2008, I was heartbroken. The loss of Type 55 and integral film was huge for me. When the Impossible Project was announced, I was determined to make these films work. I had some early frustrations, but as the films improved, my love for my SX-70s grew. I am currently using three different cameras. One is modified for strobe work, and the other two allow the use of different films. The films that I have used for this project so far are PX70 Push, PX70, PX70, PX680 First Flush, and PX 600 Silver Shade.

I hope to continue this project for as long as I can. Taking a Polaroid a day is a challenge, but watching my daughter grow on Impossible Project films has been great.”

To see more of Erin’s photography visit www.dejauregui.com. To see the wedding photography that he shoots with his wife, visit www.erinheartscourt.com. You can also follow him on twitter at @dejauregui.

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No. 402

Parmaroid

Frank Love | 1578 days ago

MAY 5 - 26, 2012
Rosso Amapola
Borgo del Correggio 48a
43121 Parma
Italy

Parmaroid exhibition is composed by 19 analog instant images.. The author of the pictures is Roberto Cavalieri who has collected lots of experience with Polaroid and Impossible films after a long period of activity as a photoreporter in Africa, where he created photography books such as “Prima della libertà” – “Before freedom” (about the life in the prisons of five African countries and its overcrowded reality, non-existent justice, great injury of human right) and “Volti di guerra” – “War faces” (portraits of soldiers and war victims in the Democratic Republic of Congo).

The photo exhibition is to remember Parma, Roberto’s home town, using instant images, capturing left-in-time spaces.

No. 403

ANALOG FEEDBACK NIGHT RECAP

Jon Campolo | 1577 days ago

Photo by Adam Custins

Last week at the NYC Space we had our first ever Analog Feedback Night. Impossible photographers and enthusiasts gathered to discuss their images in an informal open table discussion. The night was a warm gathering of like minded individuals and an excellent way for people to meet other passionate Impossible photographers. We discussed shooting methods, differences in film types, and the advantages and disadvantages of shooting analog instant film in various settings. Adam Custins came in with his portfolio and talked about how he integrates instant film into his commercial work. Dave Knapik was preparing for an art exhibition (up now!) and requested input about framing and presentation methods. We also had some great imagery shown by Josie Keefe, Patrick Tobin and Wendy Strauss.

Analog Feedback Night will be a reoccurring event at our space. If you miss those art school class critiques or just want to discuss other people’s work while getting feedback on your own, come to the next Analog Feedback night on May 31st!

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No. 404

Death Republica

Frank Love | 1577 days ago

until MAY 11, 2012
En Face
2 rue Jacquard
75011 Paris

In this dark exhibition French photographer Thibault Tourmente presents Polaroids and other dead stuff at Art Azart in Paris.

Thibault is using Impossible instant images in the most creative and wild way possible: “For me, Polaroid is not a photographic medium, it’s more a plastic support! You can do so many things with it: dissect, embroider, sew it… When you have a Polaroid in your hand you are not only holding a picture but an object. You catch the moment and you materialize it.”

The exhibition is more of an installation, consisting of manipulated Impossible images, curiosities, strange objects, collages and drawings.

This is the second exhibition of Thibault Tourmente in Raul Diaz’s shop/gallery En Face – a very special place is in Paris for the fans of analog instant photography.

Visit Thibault’s website
Visit the Exhibition on facebook

No. 405

8 Exposures...with Rommel Pecson.

Patrick Tobin, | 1576 days ago

Welcome back to 8 Exposures, our instant film Q&A series. This entry turns the lens on our very good friend and extreme photographic talent, Rommel Pecson

Q1) What kind of Polaroid camera(s) do you use?

A: My prime Polaroid cameras are two SX-70 Alphas. I also have large format cameras for the 4×5 and 8×10 Polaroid films.

Q2) Why do you like instant photography?

A: There is an inherent risk and reward that all digital photography lacks which makes instant photography much more compelling for me. Also, instant photography for me is a great tool for honing my photographic skills. You really have to work hard and know your tools to translate your vision to the camera. Yes, there are quirks with instant camera and films, but this challenge is what makes you more aware of your tools and subject because the image taken is final.

Q3) What is your earliest memory of instant film?

A: My aunt taking instant photos of me when I was a kid, it was magic to see the images slowly appear on those small frames.

Q4) What’s your favorite Impossible Project film type?

A: PX 100, hands down. I really like the silvery tone that makes the image appear timeless and nostalgic.

Q5) What are your favorite subjects to photograph?

A: It depends on what time I have for myself and having three wonderful children leaves very little of that. If I have an extra time, it will be portrait or landscape and street photography between lunch break and commute.

I always look for balance in my images, either by lines and forms or the harmony between the positive and negative space. Also Japanese minimalism and wood block prints are a big influence on my composition.

Q6) Tell us about a project you’re working on.

A: There are two projects I am currently working on, or trying to. The first one involves 8×10 portraits using the remaining 10 sheets I have of Polaroid 809 film. The film is precious for me, so I am very selective of choosing my subject and setting before I shoot. The project, in my ways, is about negation. I am choosing not to photograph far more images than I am taking. Again, this is in contrast to digital photography, where there’s no reason not to take every picture you can. The second involves using the Impossible PX 100 Silver Shade film, on this I am seeking out NYC cityscapes with the intention of capturing pictorial and dreamlike states, to bring the image of the past onto the present.

Q7) Who are your favorite photographers, instant or otherwise?

A: Edward Steichen has a great influence on me as well as Mary Ellen Mark, Robert Capa and Henri Cartier-Bresson. I find inspiration in portraiture of Mark Seliger, Frank Ockenfels, Chuck Close and Greg Heisler, and there are also many talented photographers on image hosting sites that inspire me as well.

Q8) If you could take a photo of anyone or anything what would it be?

A: It would be an 8×10 Polaroid portrait of Nelson Mandela or the Dalai Lama.

Thanks very much to Rommel for taking part in 8 Exposures. To see more of his work, click HERE. Rommel also shoots brilliant large format photography, which can be viewed HERE

No. 406

HOLDEN X IMPOSSIBLE CYCLE 4 WINNERS!

Jon Campolo | 1576 days ago

Photo by Michelle Karpman

Cycle 4 of the Holden x Impossible Timeless In An Instant photo contest has closed.

The winners of round four were chosen by American photographer Jimmy Fontaine. A fashion and music photographer by trade, Jimmy is interested in communicating candid truth through portraiture.

And the winner is…

“HAZY MORNINGS”
by Michelle Karpman
Film: PX 680 Color Shade

And Runner Up:

NIKOLA
by Jozef Mician
Film: PX 70 Color Shade

Congratulations to Michelle and Jozef, each will receive an Impossible film pack and a Holden t-shirt!

Don’t miss your chance to become a winner of Cycle 5 and win one of the next bi-weekly prizes – SUBMIT HERE and best of luck!

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No. 407

The Camera Museum: Polaroid 50th Anniversary Sun 600 SE

Patrick Tobin, | 1575 days ago

In 1987, Polaroid celebrated its 50th anniversary. Fittingly, a special edition of the popular Sun 600 LMS camera was released, with gold face and marked, “Polaroid 50, 1937-1987”.

Aside from its appearance, the Polaroid 50th Anniversary camera sported the same features as the earlier Sun 600 LMS. A basic 600-series camera, the 50th Anniversary camera features a 116mm single-element plastic lens, fixed focus with a minimal focal length of 4 feet, electronic shutter and a built-in electronic flash.

Additionally, this special-edition camera was accompanied with a matching “Polaroid 50” carrying case.

The 50th Anniversary Sun 600 works with any of Impossible’s 600-speed film. For a complete selection of compatible films, click HERE

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No. 408

Impossible's Sunday Brunch

Patrick Tobin, | 1574 days ago

Photo by Thomas Krauss

Hi friends, and welcome to Impossible’s Sunday Brunch. Each week, we’ll be posting 5 tasty photos that caught our eye over the past week.

Photos this week were taken by Thomas Krauss, Bradley Johnson, Thomas Bottcher, Josie Keefe and Zia Khan, using the following film types: PX 680 Cool, PX 70 Cool and PX 100

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No. 409

8 Exposures...with Juli Werner

Patrick Tobin, | 1573 days ago

Hi there, instanteers. Welcome back to 8 Exposures, our instant film Q&A series. This week, we bring you New Mexico-based Juli Werner

Q1) What kind of Polaroid camera(s) do you use?

A: I have 14 Polaroid cameras in my collection, give or take. The ones that I use the most are an original SX-70 that I mainly use to shoot expired Polaroid 600 film and two SX-70 Alphas that I use for Impossible films. I also love my SLR 680 and Spectra. I have a couple of different cameras for peel-apart film, but my favorite is the 250 that I bought from Dave Bias a few years ago. I love being able to have a couple of different cameras loaded up with different films.

Q2) Why do you like instant photography?

A: Because it’s magic. It captures a moment in time like no other medium. And it brings joy to so many people, myself included. Instant film always makes me feel better. If I am down or having a bad day, shooting a few shots seems to turn things around. Magic!

I also love the imperfections of instant film. I tend to be a perfectionist, but instant film forces me to let go and be open to anything that happens. I find that I eventually fall in love with most of my instant shots, even the ones that I initially cast aside as mistakes. I even love the film jams that occasionally happen. The color changes that some of the Impossible films go through are incredible.

I am so grateful that The Impossible Project took on the task of reinventing instant film because I don’t know what I would do without it.

Q3) What is your earliest memory of instant film?

A: To be honest, I have a horrible memory, but since my parents have at least one album full of instant shots, I know that many were taken throughout my childhood. I still have the two Sun 600 cameras that my dad used back then.

It wasn’t until the summer of 1993 that I was re-introduced to instant film. My best friend and I met two guys who were traveling from Seattle to New Orleans. They had a Polaroid camera – a Sun 600 most likely – and were documenting their trip. I thought that it was the coolest idea ever! I immediately decided that next time I was at my parents’ house, I was going to “borrow” one of my dad’s Polaroid cameras. I don’t think I’ve taken a long road trip without a Polaroid since then.

Q4) What’s your favorite Impossible Project film type?

A: This is a tough question for me, because I love all the Impossible films. And I always have to try each new film that is released. It’s a bit of a compulsion, I suppose. I love the PX 680 Gold Frame film, and I can’t wait to shoot more of it on our upcoming road trip. The colors are so intense. PZ 680 is another favorite. And I have a soft spot for all the PX 70 films. The latest test film is absolutely mind-blowing. The PX 100 UV+ is a favorite as well. It has such a timeless quality to it.

Q5) What are your favorite subjects to photograph?

A: Looking at my photostream on Flickr, the obvious answer is cats and flowers. And self-portraits. But they aren’t the only things that I like to photograph, I just happen to work from home and tend to photograph what’s around me. Other things that I love to photograph: trees, the beach, vast and barren landscapes, and clouds. I also love to document things: celebrations, rock shows, parties, birthdays, road trips. It’s become a tradition to take instant shots of me and my husband on our anniversaries as well as birthday portraits/self-portraits. I have self-portraits from New Year’s Eve that date back to 1998 or so. And I always take a Polaroid camera – or three – when we travel. I love being away from home and shooting things that I don’t see every day. (Of course I still end up with a few cat and flower shots.) I used to take a lot of candid shots of our friends, but I don’t seem to do that so much anymore. Shooting portraits is something I’d like to focus on again.

Q6) Tell us about a project you’re working on.

A: I don’t really have a specific project; just some ideas floating around. Right now I am thinking a lot about some of our upcoming travels, particularly our road trip to Pittsburgh. I plan to take portraits of our friends on Impossible films. And I think some of the Silver Shade films are going to be perfect for capturing the city. I want to take some photo walks in a couple of my favorite neighborhoods there. Last time we visited, I didn’t really get a chance to walk around with my cameras.

I’d also like to take more photographs around New Mexico. I grew up here but there are so many places that I have never been. This idea may end up being something more specific like photographing all the old churches or vintage motel signs. I need to start taking some day trips and see what happens.

Q7) Who are your favorite photographers, instant or otherwise?

A: I am inspired and amazed by the instant photography that I see from my Flickr contacts every single day. It would be difficult to pick one or two favorites. It’s such a wonderful community, and it’s been so much fun getting to know other people who share the same obsession for instant film. I love checking out what everyone’s been shooting, instant or otherwise.

Heather Champ and Alison Garnett are two people that I have to mention because both of them have inspired me so much over the years. I’ve learned about so many different cameras and films from following their work online. Both are amazing photographers and so incredibly creative in all that they do.

Some of my favorite well-known photographers are Walker Evans, Stephen Shore, Nan Goldin, and Robert Frank. And I’ve always loved Allen Ginsberg’s Photographs.

Q8) If you could take a photo of anyone or anything what would it be?

A: My husband and I travel across the country by car a lot, but we usually have to get to where we are going in a set of amount of time. One thing I would love to do someday is to take a long, meandering road trip, one that has no time restraints and is more about the photographing of the journey and not just the destination.

About Juli

I’m a fiber artist and runner living in Santa Fe, New Mexico with my husband Will Dyar and our two cats, Rocky and Simon. Some might say that I am obsessed with food, cats, vampires and Steelers football. And, of course, instant film.

Thanks very much to Juli for taking part in 8 Exposures! To see more of her work, visit her Flickr Photostream

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No. 410

Factory Shots 6/8

Factory Team | 1572 days ago

Photo by Lia Sáile

The Film Production Machine

On the top floor of Building North is the heart of Impossible film production – the production hall. There are 9 giant production machines located as well as several pod filling machines, 1 big slitter, the reactors, 2 molding machines and many additional tools.

This area is the loudest part of the factory and the machines can be heard and felt throughout the entire building like heavy heartbeats.

This photo shows only one part of the production machine; it is the rotating part with several stations in wich different adjustments (folding, glue, filmcode etc.) are made to package our film into the nice inner box.

8 Factory Shots will present one photo a week for eight weeks.

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No. 411

Viewfinder: Rambler's Bone

Patrick Tobin, | 1571 days ago

On April 5th, American born photographers Mikael Kennedy & Sean Sullivan set out from Los Angeles, CA, deep into the heart of the country on a 30 day road trip to explore America, sponsored by Wolverine boots.

The project, titled Ramblers Bone, chronicles Sullivan & Kennedy’s trek east into the high deserts of New Mexico before turning north through the Rockies, into the wild lands of Montana, across to the Pacific for the last leg of their journey, bringing them down the California coast where the wilderness meets the water.

Mikael brought along some PX 70 film on his journey and he has captured some beautiful moments.

To see more of the duo’s photographic work from their trip, please visit www.ramblersbone.com/

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No. 412

In the Press: Holland Herald

Frank Love | 1571 days ago

Mark Smith has recently paid a visit to the Impossible factory in Enschede for an interview with Impossible’ co-founder and production manager André Bosman.

This interview along with a brilliant article has now been published in the in-flight magazine of KLM, the Holland Herald.

Luckily, you don’t have to board a KLM plane to enjoy it but can simply click here to read the whole article

No. 413

PZ 680 Color Shade COOL

Frank Love | 1570 days ago

We are proud to present the last film of our Spring 2012 Cool Edition Film Line – a new color film that works with your beloved Spectra, Image & 1200 cameras. Enjoy extra wide shots with soft and dreamy color tones, imbuing your cinematic instant images with a modern spin on vintage color characteristics.

In order to bring out the coolest colors ever you’ll have to understand this film and in which situations it will create the greatest colors:
> For best results on bright days, turn your L/D switch to DARKEN
> This film performs best in diffuse light and loves overcast days
> The film does not respond very well to flash (images will be muddy)
> Make sure you shield this film well
> Keep the photos warm for the first few minutes of development

Get the film in our Online Shop

No. 414

TRACES OF TIME - OPENING RECEPTION RECAP

Jon Campolo | 1570 days ago

Last Thursday we celebrated the opening of our latest exhibition, Traces of Time, at the NYC Space. The show consists of images taken by photographers and fellow travelers Varial and Fabrice Nadjari along their travels in the deserts and villages of Afghanistan.

Guests enjoyed the vibrant showcase of Impossible films alongside a video presentation of the artists’ journey. DJ Rodolphe filled the room with vinyl music, refreshments were generously provided by Brooklyn Brewery and Impossible photographers captured the night on the new PX100 COOL film.

Thank you to all who attended, and congratulations to the artists. Traces of Time will be on display at the Impossible Project NYC Space during regular open hours: Monday through Friday 11am–7pm and on Weekends 12pm–6pm until June 3rd. Don’t miss your chance to see it!

No. 415

SX-70 WORKSHOP @ THE NYC SPACE

Jon Campolo | 1570 days ago

SUNDAY, May 20, 2012
10:00 AM to 1:00 PM
The Impossible Project NYC Space
Photo by Kisha Bari

Master an Iconic Tool in the History of Analog Photography!

The Impossible Project NYC Space is excited to welcome back a classic workshop on the most celebrated of Polaroid cameras, the SX-70. On Sunday, May 20th, the Impossible team will host a three hour interactive workshop on maximizing Impossible film in the Polaroid SX-70 Camera. Our introductory workshops are designed to give you the confidence you need to let your imagination run wild! We’ll discuss the features of the SX-70 camera and focus on shooting techniques to ensure you achieve the best results out of the newest Impossible films available.

You’ll be guided through the ins and outs of the Polaroid SX-70 series with a knowledgeable Impossible expert staffer and learn techniques including exposure, functionality, light shielding, temperature control and about available accessories.

We’ll then lead you on an interactive photo walk with one of Impossible’s experienced staff photographers, capturing the photogenic charm of downtown New York as they explore SOHO, Chinatown, and Little Italy. The group will then reconvene back at the space to review images, ask questions and talk about image storage and preservation.

Contact us and register for your chance to master an iconic tool in the history of photography!

WHEN: SUNDAY, May 20, 2012, 10:00 AM to 1:00 PM
WHERE: Impossible Project Space, 425 Broadway, Floor 5, NYC 10013
REGISTRATION: Call (212) 219 3254 or nycspace@theimpossibleproject.com
Please notify when registering if renting a camera at no extra cost.
FEE: $50 (price includes 1 pack PX 70 Color Shade COOL & PX Shade)

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No. 416

Anna Paquin for Zooey Magazine

Frank Love | 1570 days ago

Anna Paquin by Derek Wood

Impossible is proud to announce its collaboration with the lovely Zooey magazine.

Analog instant art lover and photographer Derek Wood will from now on be shooting very special Impossible images for upcoming issues.

Anna Paquin, lead of “True Blood”, is not only gracing the cover of the current issue of Zooey magazine but is also the first Impossible model for Derek’s upcoming Impossible images.

Get Zooey on newsstands now.

Get Gold Frame film in our Online Shop

No. 417

Paris - we're open!

Frank Love | 1569 days ago

Photo by Eglantine Aubry

We’re Open! Come and visit our new and brilliant Impossible Project Space in Paris.

Situated close to Republique in the “Haut Marais” in one of the most creative and bustling district of the city we’ve opened our doors, providing you with all Impossible films and accessoires, refurbished Polaroid cameras, books and magazines.

Befriend Impossible Paris on Facebook

Click for all Store details

Buy PX 680 Cool Paris Edition online and get 5 Euro off your first purchase in Paris!

No. 418

8 Exposures...with Thomas Krauss

Patrick Tobin, | 1569 days ago

Hello, Impossibles! Welcome back to 8 Exposures, our instant film Q&A series. This entry brings you photographic Frenchman Thomas Krauss

Q1) What kind of Polaroid camera(s) do you use?

A: From the moment I fell for instantaneous photographs I‘ve tried different ones, but mostly those that use 600 film. The very first one, the trigger, the Archduke of Austria, was the fruit of an exchange for a Holga. Lately I’ve mostly been using an SLR 680, a 690, and an instant Type 100 back for my 4×5 camera.

Q2) Why do you like instant photography?

A: I honestly don’t know, my banker is after me. My wife and him agree so much in restraining my buying frenzy that I’m beginning to think there’s something between them…My photographs lack perfection. I don’t master any of the parameters at shooting…

Q3) What is your earliest memory of instant film?

A: The one and only time during my childhood when I used a Polaroid was for Manu’s birthday. Manu was the little fair-haired boy who lived opposite us. (Since then he has grown and moved).
The boy I’ve always known.
The boy I cycled with.
The boy I watched the Tour de France withthe boy who made me hate the Tour de France.
The boy I played Monopoly withthe boy who made me hate Monopoly…So maybe he’s the one who made me hate birthdays and love Polaroid!

Q4) What’s your favorite Impossible film type?

A: Meat is my hobby-horse. The colour of meat. I’ve always been attracted to colour. When I started trying to feed my SLR 680, I naturally went for the PX 680 that was newly produced by Impossible…since then we’ve lived happily together and had plenty of children!

Q5) What are your favorite subjects to photograph?

A: I started taking pictures 5 years ago. When my oldest girl was born. I can truly say that my two daughters are my favourite subjects.
I always come back to them as photographic subjects.
It’s as if they were the centre of a spiral.
I need to get away from them in order to succeed in my coming-back.

Q6) Tell us about a project you’re working on.

A: As it is often the case since I’ve been doing instantaneous pictures, I got the idea from Polaroid. However I’m moving this project onto a 6×7 format.
To cut it shortpeople with an outstanding backside!

Q7) Who are your favorite photographers, instant or otherwise?

A: I have very few if not little photographic references…however here would be my winners: the gold medal would go to Richard Avedon – I don’t think I need to justify my choice…The silver medal would be for Saul Leiter (I discovered him through my talented and friend photographer Pierre Belhassen. I would need a lot of bronze medals to give to those who inspire me day after day and who are not as well known as the two first winners!

Q8) If you could take a photo of anyone or anything what would it be?

A: If we could bring back to life someone, I think I would love to shoot Daniel Emilfork. Once you’ve found him on Google pictures , you’ll understand why.

About Thomas

I live near Perpignan. I’m a dad, a spouse, a son, a friend… and sometimes a mathematic teacher!

Thank you very much to Thomas for taking part in 8 Exposures! To see more of his work, please visit his Flickr Photostream

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No. 419

Viewfinder: Chloe Aftel at Coachella

Patrick Tobin, | 1568 days ago

Recently, our good friend Chloe Aftel attended Coachella to shoot for Spin Magazine. While there, she also captured some beautiful, dreamy shots using Impossible PZ 680 film

Chloe says, “Using the new Impossible films at Coachella was a real pleasure. From the overcast days to the bright sunlight, I got nothing but extraordinary colors. The film really creates its own atmosphere that only enhances the lighting conditions of the day.”

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No. 420

Impossible's Sunday Brunch - Issue 2

Patrick Tobin, | 1567 days ago

Photo by Worth Goddard

Hi friends, and welcome back to Impossible’s Sunday Brunch. Each week, we’ll be posting 5 tasty photos that caught our eye over the past week.

On the menu today, photos taken by Worth Goddard, Santi Navarro Benavente, Scott Southall, Matt Widmann and Mark von Minden.

The photos were taken with following film types: PX 70 12/11 and PX 70 Nigo

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No. 421

Dr. Love's Tips: The Impossible Flash Bar by Mint

Patrick Tobin, | 1566 days ago

Hello again, Dr. Love fans! This week, Dr. Love talks about the occasional hiccups you may experience when using the Impossible Flash Bar by Mint with your SX-70…

We’ve had several people write in asking for some help in how to use their new Impossible Mint Flashbars. For many people, they are only now using a flash on their cameras for the first time. Either that, or they haven’t used a flash for a long while.

It is not uncommon to encounter some issues when first trying a flash on your camera. These cameras as you all know are old, and even ones repaired to the best of anyone’s ability can show some quirks when first using a flash again.

This is in part because putting a flash bar on a camera is basically just like flicking a switch in the camera, and for many of these cameras this can be a ‘switch’ that hasn’t been touched for years. This can be the source of the issue as the camera can work perfectly fine without the use of flash, but after attaching a flashbar, be it the Impossible Mint electronic flash or a traditional single-use flashbar, suddenly you’re using a few different pieces of hardware and electronics in your camera, and issues in these parts could easily go unnoticed for years if you haven’t used a flash. Be sure the contacts, for the flashbar and the socket, are clean. Using a pipe cleaner or coarse toothbrush with some alcohol can usually do the trick here.

The first and most important thing to remember is, if the flash can’t flash, the camera won’t fire. By that I mean, if you’re using a traditional flashbar and there aren’t any useable flashes in it, it won’t fire the camera. If you’re using the electronic flash, and it doesn’t have power, it’s the same thing. The circuitry in these cameras is made so that if the camera physically detects a flash, but there’s not electronic feedback when pressing the shutter, it is a ‘safety’ that you don’t take a shot and not have the flash fire.

This is a little easier with traditional bars where you can look and see if they look used, electronic ones you need to be sure you use quality batteries for electronics to ensure faster and better charging with a longer useful charge life. Some things can operate on discount batteries, but if you use a flash with cheaper batteries, it will more likely be a headache as it will take longer to charge and will more quickly be insufficient to charge the flash for use.

When using the Impossible Mint flashbar, you can also use 600-speed films in your SX-70 when using the ‘half’ setting without the need of an ND filter. This does not affect the operation of the camera, so do remember if you’re using the faster speed film, if you’re using the flash as a fill during daylight hours, or if you take the flash off, the camera is still calculating exposure for SX-70 speed films. This means that it is only that the flash puts out less light that the film gets the correct exposure.

If using SX-70 speed film, you operate the Impossible Mint flash at the full setting, and while the camera adjusts exposure some for varying distances (folding SX-70s only), it’s always a good idea to adjust the L/D wheel darker for closer subjects, and brighter for further ones. Also take into consideration what your subject is, brighter surfaces will blow out quickly using flash versus darker colors.

The last point is where you may experience some degree of malfunction. The first things to consider are always if the flash is charged, and that the camera is ‘reading’ it, meaning that the camera knows the flash is engaged. If you haven’t used flash on your camera before or in a while, it may be best to test it with an empty pack and make sure the flash fires, and that you can repeat this and the camera operates accordingly. There is one issue where after first use of a flash, the shutter blades can remain ‘locked’ in and will close and open as you adjust focus on your camera. This is something that can happen with any flash and again is attributable with age and underuse of the ‘flash hardware’. If this occurs, you should send your camera in for repair.

The main points to remember: first test your camera, use an empty pack and try multiple times and make sure the camera fires without a problem. Then remove the flash and again fire the camera. If you can do this your camera should very likely be fine to operate with flash. If not, please contact us and we can hopefully help you troubleshoot through the issue, and you won’t have wasted any film to find out there was a problem.

Hopefully most of you can simply go out and enjoy the fun of flash photography without issue. Until next time, as always,

keep your rollers clean,

-f

15
No. 422

MAURIZIO GALIMBERTI ARTIST TALK & WORKSHOP RECAP!

Jon Campolo | 1566 days ago

Last weekend we were lucky enough to host TWO special events with Italian maestro and analog instant master photographer Maurzio Galimberti at the NYC Space.

During his visit to New York, Maurizio shared his experiences and thoughts on the instant analog medium and on his transition from Polaroid to Impossible films. Some lucky guests were selected as subjects for some of his unique instant mosaic work, and the Impossible team was there to capture a video of the action.

To send him off in style, The NYC Space will host one final event with Maurizio, a farewell pizza party and documentary screening!

Come by The Impossible Project NYC Space on Tuesday the 22nd of May for a one time screening of a wonderful documentary on the photographic life of Maurizio Galimberti. If you missed the chance to meet him earlier this month, now’s your chance to eat pizza and drink some beers with Maurizio himself at this informal event.

MAURIZIO GALIMBERTI DOCUMENTARY & PIZZA PARTY!

WHEN: TUESDAY, MAY 22ND, 2012 from 7:00 PM to 9:00 PM
WHERE: Impossible Project NYC Space, 425 Broadway, 5th Floor Between Howard & Canal Street
FREE and open to the public!

No. 423

Factory Shots 7/8

Factory Team | 1565 days ago

Photo by Lia Sáile

The Read-out panel

One of the huge advantages of our analog project is that also our working tools are very analog. Being around 40 years old, the old Polaroid film production machinery is just as analog as we and our products are.

In general there is no complicated computer programming needed (although there were some digital adjustments made in the past) in order to keep all machines up and running. Whenever any problem occurs, the corresponding light flashes up on the read-out panel. We then know where to find the problem to repair or to replace an old and tired feature of the machine – and zack! everything is up and running again.

8 Factory Shots will present one photo a week for eight weeks.

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No. 424

Viewfinder: Kyle Vaughn

Patrick Tobin, | 1564 days ago

Welcome back to Viewfinder, our ongoing series showcasing interesting projects that incorporate Impossible film. This week, we bring you Texas photographer Kyle Vaughn

“My name is Kyle Vaughn, and I am a writer, teacher, and photographer in Dallas, Texas. As an artist, though I’ve predominantly worked as a writer over the last 15 years, I’ve increasingly turned to photography for inspiration and have even made a go at photography at a more professional level, publishing images and making and selling Polaroid posters. And though I continue on mainly as a writer, I’d say that photography somewhat saved my writing, teaching me how to better see the images I was after and how to study multiple points of view (even the inside of something), somewhat like the sculptor Auguste Rodin challenged his secretary to do. As it happens, his secretary was the poet Rainer Maria Rilke! I learned that as a writer, I am not separate from the things I am writing about, not somehow above the world, not in character nor in spirit nor in mind. I learned that I needed to interact with the world, be involved. That merging of the metaphysical back into the physical is what, in part, drew me to instant photography. And as an artist who loves to both preserve the important parts of my past, but also experiment, I have been fascinated and inspired by the Impossible Project from the moment I read of their plan to continue instant film production.

Instant photography represents the idea of memory to me better than any other format. Memories come in light blown like glass. They are grainy, silent like a snow is, blurred, intense, and somehow both the expansive universe and the microcosmos. The way we see, the way we stand, the way we form words is laced with memories of smoke, wounds, laundromats, counting after lightning flash, filling the bathtub, neon, weed-fields, paperclips—the large, the small—the effigies of our many, many old selves. Sometimes, I’m consumed by these memories, but I keep orbiting toward these images, whether in word, deed, or pure image, as in photography.

When my poetry manuscript, Teenage Symphony to God and Laughter, was recently selected as a finalist for Write Bloody Publishing’s 2012 contest, I knew that instant photography would play a role in the story of my book. As part of Write Bloody’s consideration for who will move on to receive a book contract, they have asked the 20 finalists to submit a video of one of their poems, a visual and audio representation of their work. For the poem I would choose, I knew that I wanted something that felt freeing, something that opened up the sky like a little balloon floating into the horizon. Using one of my poems that did just that provided the perfect opportunity to use instant film, and I was thrilled to be able to use Impossible film for many of the shots. Inspired as I am by Impossible’s vision as well as their film, I also worked a line into my poem as homage. I was especially happy to be able to use some of the black frame film (it’s so striking)…and my order of Nigo edition film arrived (and a carnival suddenly appeared down the street) just in time to be a part of my video.

You can view my video on YouTube at the link below. Throughout the month of May, you can also support my bid for a book contract by clicking “like” after viewing. To watch the video on YouTube, click HERE

The Impossible Project creates some amazing film. There are qualities to their film that make it unique and, to me, preferable to anything else: tones you won’t get anywhere else, bursts of color, something both bold and full of vibrato, like a song. They are clearly committed to an aesthetic. I also greatly appreciate the optimism they represent. This is something so needed in art today. Impossible believes, makes, and forges ahead.”

To see more of Kyle’s work, please visit his blog at http://www.krvlibrary.blogspot.com/

No. 425

Light Night Impossible Pop-Up Shop

Frank Love | 1564 days ago

MAY 18, 2012, 5.30 - 10 pm
Open Eye
19 Mann Island
Liverpool Waterfront
Liverpool
L3 1BP

Founded in 1977 Open Eye is an independent not-for-profit photography gallery based in Liverpool. They are one of the UK’s leading photography spaces, and the only gallery dedicated to photography and related media in the North West of England.

Come along to Open Eye Gallery on Liverpool Light Night with your friends and loved ones and get snapped vintage-style! Open Eye is well and truly hooked on Impossible Project’s new instant film, so they decided to invite Incognito artist and Impossible expert Tom Wright to spread the love.

Tom is setting-up a pop up studio outside the gallery, creating gorgeous snapshots of you and yours to take away.

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No. 426

Ruvan & Kasia in Dazed Digital & at Aria London

Frank Love | 1563 days ago

MAY 18 - JUN 15, 2012
Aria’s Barnsbury Hall
Barnsbury Street
Islington
London N1 1PN
Kasia Bobula

Tonight sees the opening of a brand new Impossible exhibition at contemporary lifestyle store Aria.

The exhibition features the Impossible artworks of Ruvan Wijesooriya and Kasia Bobula.

The two artists were talking to Dazed about their analog instant experiences and thoughts – read the interview herel

No. 427

VARIAL & NADJARI ARTIST TALK @ THE NYC SPACE

Jon Campolo | 1563 days ago

THURSDAY, MAY 24, 2012
6:00 PM to 8:00 PM
The Impossible Project NYC Space

To celebrate the recent opening of Traces of Time, the vibrant new exhibition to open on our South wall, photographers and fellow travelers Varial and Fabrice Nadjari will visit the NYC Space to talk about their experience shooting Impossible film in the remote deserts and villages of the Wakhan corridor, Afghanistan. Guests will have the opportunity to ask the artists about their shooting and survival techniques and hear the inside story on their adventure. If you haven’t had a chance to see this unique exhibition, Traces of Time will be showing in the NYC Space until June 1st.

While you prepare your burning questions for the artists, check out their story on The New York Times LENS blog or listen to their interview on NPR!

WHEN: THURSDAY, MAY 24, 2012 from 6:00 PM to 8:00 PM
WHERE: Impossible Project Space NYC 425 Broadway, 5th Floor Between Howard & Canal Streets
RSVP: Email rsvp@theimpossibleproject.com or call +1 212 219 3254
FREE and open to the public!

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No. 428

8 Exposures...with Heather Polley

Patrick Tobin, | 1562 days ago

Photo by Nick and Dave Photography

It’s time for another foray into 8 Exposures territory. This entry revolves around California photographer Heather Polley

1) What kind of Polaroid camera(s) do you use?

I have several folding SX-70s, as well as a plastic box-type Pronto SX-70. For pack film, I shoot an Automatic 104 Land Camera. My dad is conveniently a vintage camera dealer. He recently gave me three Spectra cameras that are so new to me, I haven’t had a chance to shoot them yet.

2) Why do you like instant photography?

Instant film breathed new life into my work. I’ve always been an analog photographer, and I work a lot with alternative print processes because the element of chance brings a freshness and beauty that you don’t often see in digital work. I like happy accidents and imperfections. I shot with 35mm film for many years, but I have found that shooting instant film adds a new layer of complexity to my compositions.

3) What is your earliest memory of instant film?

Most of the pictures my parents took of me as a child were with a Polaroid camera, probably a One Step. It was there for every milestone and event while I was growing up.

4) What’s your favorite Impossible film type?

I’m partial to the PX 100 Silver Shade, especially the generation right after the First Flush. I just love the way it responds to temperature (especially cold) and atmospheric changes. I experimented with blasting the PX 100 First Flush with a hair dryer, which is why a lot of my earlier pieces have a higher contrast and a redder color.

5) What are your favorite subjects to photograph?

I photographed architecture for many years, but lately I’ve been working more with still life and landscapes. I’m drawn to anything without a person in the frame, basically!

6) Tell us about a project you’re working on.

I scanned some of my still lifes taken with the PX 100 First Flush and made platinum/palladium prints on tissue paper for a series called Twice Removed. I have another series of color still lifes taken with Fade To Black Film. I’m also working on a series of landscapes taken in Pt. Reyes north of San Francisco with Type 100 Chocolate film and various generations of Silver Shade film.

7) Who are your favorite photographers, instant or otherwise?

My favorite photographers are Eugene Atget, Hiroshi Sugimoto, Todd Hido, and I love the series Attracted to Light by Doug and Mike Starn. I recently saw a retrospective of Francesca Woodman’s work at SFMOMA that knocked me out. Many anonymous 19th-century daguerreotypes and albumen prints have had the biggest impact on my alternative processes work. I’ve also gotten inspiration from Japanese woodblock prints and Dutch still life paintings.

My favorite instant photographers are probably contemporaries on Flickr. David Sankey’s work was the first work I saw on the PX 100 First Flush film, oddly enough on Asthmatic Kitty Records’ website. I credit him with my discovery of The Impossible Project and all my work that came from it. I also love the work of Andrew Millar, Laura Watt, Ludwig West, Amanda Mason, and JL Pictures.

8) If you could take a photo of anyone or anything what would it be?

I would love to have an entire day to photograph the interior of The Paramount Theatre, a spectacular Art Deco movie palace in Oakland, CA.

About Heather

I am a San Francisco-based fine-art photographer and manager of a boutique that represents local artisans. I am also an absolute music obsessive, and I have been thinking about trying performance photography.

To see more of Heather’s work, please visit her Flickr photostream, her Facebook page and her Tumblr. You can also follow her on Twitter at @sfphotogirl.

No. 429

Polaroid Classic Line presents: Factory Jacket

Frank Love | 1562 days ago

The Polaroid Classic Line – presented by Impossible in collaboration with Polaroid – brings you a selection of the most memorable products and designs from Polaroid’s history. Today we are proud to present the latest addition to this carefully developed product line.

During the 70s and 80s, Polaroid factory workers wore the original Polaroid jacket at special occasions. Its classic, sporty yet elegant design features the legendary Polaroid Color Spectrum and emanates classic Polaroid style.

The Polaroid Classic Line now makes this replica garment available to the worldwide fans of analog instant photography. The Polaroid factory jacket is produced with the highest attention to the original details in state of the art modern production, made of hi-tech breathable polyester microfiber. Please check the details on available sizes in the online shop to find a jacket that perfectly fits you, available in XS, S, M, L and XL – GO TO SHOP

No. 430

HOLDEN X IMPOSSIBLE CYCLE 5 WINNERS!

Jon Campolo | 1562 days ago

Photo by Melanie Rodriguez

Cycle 5 of the Holden x Impossible Timeless In An Instant photo contest has closed.

The winners of round five were chosen by California born photographer Kassia Meador. A world traveler at heart, Kassia draws influence from the sun and surf, communicating youthfulness through her sun soaked images.

And the winner is…

BARCELONA
by Melanie Rodriguez
Film: PX 70 Color Shade

And Runner Up:

SUMMER
by Dylan Boyd
Film: PX 680 COOL

Congratulations to Melanie and Dylan! Each will receive an Impossible film pack and a Holden t-shirt.

Don’t miss your chance to become a winner of the 6th and FINAL ROUND and win the last of the bi-weekly prizes – SUBMIT HERE and best of luck!

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No. 431

The Camera Museum: Polaroid 1200si

Patrick Tobin, | 1561 days ago

The Polaroid 1200si camera was first released in 2000, with an updated rounded body, as opposed to the square body of the earlier Spectra System cameras. Additionally, it differs from earlier Spectra models in that the film counter counts upward rather than downward and it was designed for compatibility with the foreign-market 12-exposure “1200” film pack.

The Polaroid 1200si features a 3-element 125mm “Quintic” plastic lens, electronic shutter, programmed automatic exposure automatic focus using Polaroid’s Sonar AF system, focus distance indicator in viewfinder which can be set for feet or meters, built-in electronic flash, a built-in self timer and a socket for electronic remote control. The Polaroid 1200si is silver in color, with navy blue trim.

The Polaroid 1200si works with all of Impossible’s PZ films. For a complete selection of compatible films, please click HERE

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No. 432

Impossible's Sunday Brunch - Issue 3

Patrick Tobin, | 1560 days ago

Photo by Sara Robinson

Hi friends, and welcome back to Impossible’s Sunday Brunch. Each week, we’ll be posting 5 tasty photos that caught our eye over the past week.

Now that the weather is improving we’ll enjoy this brunch on a picnic table. We’re loving all the great outdoor shots people are taking!

This week’s photos were taken by Sara Robinson, Emily Hunt, Cristina Corduneanu, Inger Margrete and win†erwald using the following film types: PX 70 12/11 film, PX 680 Cool and PZ 680

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No. 433

Factory Shots 8/8

Factory Team | 1558 days ago

Photo by Lia Sáile

The 8×10 Film Production Machine

In late 2009 we managed to save the last intact production machinery for the legendary 8×10 inch film format. We carefully re-located this unique equipment from Waltham near Boston to the Impossible factory, where the 8×10 production machinery is now set up.

We have already done some successful tests with Impossible 8×10 film and hope to make this new format available to worldwide customers sometimes in 2012. Keep your fingers crossed when it comes to upgrade lab samples to production, one of our biggest challenge in film production.

8 Factory Shots presented one photo a week for eight weeks. Thank you for following!

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No. 434

Viewinder: Ignas Kutavicius' Instant Experiments

Patrick Tobin, | 1557 days ago

Welcome back to Viewfinder, our blog series highlighting interesting projects that incorporate Impossible film. This week, we are happy to present Ignas Kutavicius

I was born in Lithuania at the ending of the Soviet Union era. These were the times when all foreign things were extremely rare and popular. At that time I had only heard of a camera that develops a picture moments after it was taken. I don’t think I even believed my friends when they told me about it, until I saw and experienced it myself. It was like magic! Unfortunately to own something like that you had to work in ships that go abroad or have special connections.

I started working with instant film as a photographer in the summer of 2008. My brother invited me to music and arts festival Satta Outside that took place in an old yacht club on the coast of the Curonian spit – a stone’s throw away from my hometown Klaipeda. Photography stores were selling their last reserves of Polaroid 600 film when I bought about 5 packs that I used for photographing the festival. I fell in love with this material from the first few shots and was extremely happy a few years later when I heard about Impossible Project and its important mission giving instant film a new life!

Today an SX-70 and a pack of Impossible film is always in my camera bag. After shooting countless images I started craving for more. The great thing about instant film is that it is easy to manipulate and there are millions of ways to use it to create something new. As an artist I love experimenting with different techniques and materials to create pictures. Pinhole and instant photography are two of my favorite things so I joined them together and used impossible film in cylindrical pinhole cameras to get extremely wide-angle photos. This was fun so I continued playing with this amazing material and started cutting, pasting and joining several shots into one. I love how easy it is to extend an image beyond the frame of one shot by adding a few more to give the full picture. I like using this technique for taking portraits and now started a series where I photograph my friends and people that draw my attention. I try to reflect their personalities and include their interests and stories. My plan is to gather a big enough series for a future book or exhibition.

I think it is safe to say that instant film is one of the greatest inventions of photography! It is a small miracle in your hands that lasts forever and a great material with limitless range of functions.

Thanks to Ignas for taking part. To see more of his work, please visit his Flickr photostream.

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No. 435

Analog Feedback Night is Back!

Jon Campolo | 1556 days ago

THURSDAY, MAY 31, 2012
6:00 PM to 9:00 PM
The Impossible Project NYC Space

Let’s talk about PX, baby!

Tackling the Impossible takes time, dedication and expertise − and we can all get by with a little help from our friends. Come join in on the ever-growing Impossible community for our next monthly Analog Feedback Night.

Next Thursday, May 31st, come by the NYC Space to show off your work. Talk film and photography with like minded instant enthusiasts over a few beers. Discover new camera and film secrets, geek out and maybe even get your work featured on The Impossible Blog – this is your chance to connect with other artists and photographers involved in the instant film community!

WHEN: THURSDAY, MAY 31, 2012 6:00 PM to 9:00 PM
WHERE: Impossible Project Space NYC 425 Broadway, 5th Floor Between Howard & Canal Streets
RSVP: Email rsvp@theimpossibleproject.com or call +1 212 219 3254
FREE and open to the public!

No. 436

Dr. Love's Tips: New PZ 680 COOL

Patrick Tobin, | 1556 days ago

After some testing here at Impossible, we’ve come to realize our latest version of the new PZ 680 COOL film has some unique properties that we thought we should address. Here’s Dr. Love…

Some of the conventional wisdom that has come to be associated with how to work with our films, may actually lead to making your images look worse instead of better. Some things we want to point out are…

1. The film is NOT fast, as we originally reported. It actually tests a little slow. It is however VERY sensitive in opacification failure, EVEN with the use of a Frog Tongue. Be very careful to shield completely!
2. If you have tried adjustments to counteract blown highlights and crushed blacks (little latitude and range), there are some things that you might be doing that actually compound the problem. With the highlights, the film was being exposed to a degree due to the opacifier being unable to block enough light. This resulted in people shooting it on the ‘dark’ setting making the blacks blacker, but their highlights would still be blown out from opacification failure, this effectively makes the film look too light AND too dark.
3. Heating of the film makes it behave faster in ISO speed, cooler development slows it. In the past, we typically have recommended heating our color films during development for increased contrast, but with the PZ 680 Cool, heating actually exaggerated the issue of the photos looking too bright and too dark in certain spots even more.

The best method to help ensure your images aren’t exposed to too much light, especially important when outside on sunny days, is to use a Spectra Frog Tongue AND use the shutter button delay trick: with Spectra cameras, until you let go of the shutter button, the photo won’t eject. So, when you press the shutter release to take your photo, hold the shutter button down until you have the chance to eject it into a dark bag/box etc. The same trick applies when using the self-timer, the image is taken after the countdown, but doesn’t eject until you turn the timer off. This trick works on nearly all models of Spectras (not 1200ff).

In general, the film should be shot with your Lighten/Darken switch to the center, if your images appear over exposed it’s likely from light exposure, to which I suggest using the delayed ejection. Even if the shot is shielded, high ambient light can affect the film, so avoiding light as best as possible and for several minutes is best. Any heating should be to mainly counter colder environments, but the film does not need to be generally heated like you might do with the other color films.

Keep your rollers clean,

-f

25
No. 437

8 Exposures...with Tyler Tyndell

Patrick Tobin, | 1555 days ago

Welcome back to 8 Exposures, our popular instant film Q&A series. This week, we turn our lens on Texas teacher and photographer Tyler Tyndell

1) What kind of Polaroid camera(s) do you use?

The truth is that by the time this interview runs, it will have changed. Realizing the potential for all Polaroid camera models to be useful, I acquire them readily. Of course, my SX-70 is with me at all times as well as two 250 Land Cameras. Being as it is, when my SX-70 needs troubleshooting, my father-in-law is kind enough to lend me one of his. Other cameras that are usually with me are an SX-70 Pronto and a Polaroid Spectra.

2) Why do you like instant photography?

Can I give a dissertation? In all seriousness, instant photography breathes creativity. For me it provides an avenue for creativity that I would have never been exposed to otherwise. I believe the addictive quality induced from instant photography is best explained by truly understanding the magnitude of what happens the moment you press the shutter. It could be everything or nothing that you imagined. The 35-year-old camera could false shoot and you may end up transferring the pack to another camera, just to harvest the image. There is a delightful quality to the possibility of failure and the subsequent pursuit of a single image that is worth the time to stop, breath, see and hold.

3) What is your earliest memory of instant film?

Regretfully, I only have faint memories of a Polaroid 600 camera in our house as a child. However, I delight in the serendipitous events that led me to a garage sale one early morning last winter. I bought a Polaroid 600 OneStep for 25 cents having heard that “I think there is a company making film for those now,” and embarked on the journey that has led me here. Ask my daughter that question in 25 years. Thankfully, she’ll have a completely different answer and plenty of Impossible images to show for it.

4) What’s your favorite Impossible film type?

Having cut my teeth on PX 680 FF, I feel obligated to comment on the noteworthy and unmatched characteristics of such a lovely film. To date I am most attached to the PX 70 12/11 batch and its consistency. Again and again the colors and tonal range come through for me, which is important in being able to utilize it in personal work as well as professional jobs.

5) What are your favorite subjects to photograph?

People. As a portrait photographer, the need to capture and convey the expression of a face or a body transfers very naturally to instant film. It always amazes me how people respond to having their photo taken with an SX-70 versus my DSLR. There is a certain non-threatening comfort to it. More specifically, my daughter Pyper. It is important for me to know that she’ll have a new generation of instant photos that captured her life. I keep a PX 70 shot of her in the dashboard of my car.

6) Tell us about a project you’re working on.

Well I wrote a short story over 2 years ago and it’s just sitting there on a flash drive. I had plans to collaborate with some artist friends of mine to illustrate it, but it never took off. That was before I had fallen into this relationship with photography and instant film. Now I realize how great it is that it never actually happened. I will be using Impossible film to produce the images that will accompany the story. I’ve found that giving myself deadlines for personal work can be dangerous. These things need to happen naturally and very thoughtfully.

7) Who are your favorite photographers, instant or otherwise?

Being a young photographer and even more green in the world of instant photography, I have to say that most of my favorite instant photographers are those that are active in the Flickr and Twitter community. My father-in-law and fellow instant fanatic Troy Bradford provides constant inspiration and technical direction as well as Illustrative Photographer and friend Nick Minton. Other photographers whose work I greatly admire are Eric Ryan Anderson & my friend Sean Berry, who both utilize instant film in their work. Also Jeremy Cowart for his humanitarian and creative approach to photography. I need not forget to mention Adam Goldberg with his endless stream of introspective double exposures and photographic musings.

8) If you could take a photo of anyone or anything what would it be?

Thom Yorke of Radiohead. I’ve been saying this for years. It is no secret how he feels about media, cameras and such; which is what makes the idea of taking his portrait so desirable. You don’t just take a picture of a guy like that. You would have to really develop the photographer/subject relationship. I think he’d dig to have his photo on Impossible film.

About Tyler

People are lots of things. I am a teacher and coordinate an afterschool program here in Greenville, TX. I am a portrait and wedding photographer. Mostly I am a husband to my beautiful wife and father to my beautiful daughter. I do what I have to do, so that I can keep doing what I want to do, and that is taking pretty pictures.

To see more of Tyler’s work, visit his wedding photography website at suffixweddings.com and his Tumblr. You can also follow him on Twitter at @tylertyndell

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No. 438

The Camera Museum: Polaroid OneStep Express

Patrick Tobin, | 1554 days ago

In 1997, Polaroid reissued their plastic-bodied 600 cameras with a more modern, rounded trim. The Polaroid OneStep Express camera is otherwise the same as the earlier One Step Flash, with a built-in flash and a sliding close-up lens. It came in various color schemes, most common being the pictured green & grey and navy blue & grey.

The Polaroid OneStep Express sports a single-element 116mm plastic lens, fixed focus of 4 feet (2 feet with the close-up lens in place), electronic shutter, programmed automatic exposure and a built-in electronic flash.

The Polaroid OneStep Express works with all of Impossible’s 600 film. For a complete list of compatible films, click HERE.

To purchase your own Polaroid OneStep Express camera kit, click HERE.

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No. 439

Impossible's Sunday Brunch - Issue 4

Patrick Tobin, | 1553 days ago

Photo by Hannes Caspar

Hi friends, and welcome back to Impossible’s Sunday Brunch. Each week, we’ll be posting tasty photos that caught our eye over the past week.

This week, we’re delivering extra flavor, with 9 scrumptious Impossible images, from Hannes Caspar, Amanda Raney, Barbara Stellmach, Chris Stapledon, Ben Lormore, Dan O’Connor, Claudia Toloni, Timothy Logan and Jessica Reinhardt

All images were taken with the following film types: PX 70 12/11 film, PX 680 Gold Frame film, PX 70 NIGO film and PX 600 Black Frame film

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No. 440

8 Exposures...with Marion Lanciaux.

Patrick Tobin, | 1552 days ago

Greetings, Instanteers! Welcome back to 8 Exposures, our instant film Q&A series. For this week’s entry, we bring you Parisian wonder Marion Lanciaux

Q1) What kind of Polaroid camera(s) do you use?

A: I have several Polaroid cameras but mainly use my SX-70 and my 600 SE.

Q2) Why do you like instant photography?

A: First of all, instant film has a special way to turn something trifle into a strange chemical dream. It makes you feel like an alchemist as you can tear it open, torture it and play with it. Besides, when you work on portraits, it creates a very special bond between the person who takes the picture and the person who strikes the pose as both can discover the image appearing on film at the same time. Sharing this is rather intense as you tell a lot to someone without using words.

Q3) What is your earliest memory of instant film?

A: Family snapshots taken when we used to live in Terre Haute, Indiana. I think they were shot with a Kodak instant camera though. I was hardly thirteen when I fell in love with Sarah Moon’s work but didn’t know it was Polaroid film then.

Q4) What’s your favorite Impossible film type?

A: So far, I’ve enjoyed PX 680 the most but I’m having a blast at testing the new PX 70.

Q5) What are your favorite subjects to photograph?

A: I’m lucky enough that my loved ones and dear friends are always up for a shooting and they are my favourite people to photograph. As said before, I really feel instant photography is a dialogue between the photographer and the model. I have a thing for backs, napes and hands but I also tend to shoot windows a lot as I love the way light interacts with a transparent surface. It’s always a bit eerie.

Q6) Tell us about a project you’re working on.

A: Well, I’ve been working on visual language and communication a lot. My main project is called “correspondances”and deals with letters and polaroids. I’d like to convey, rather than depict, the various emotions linked to the reading of a personal letter and to explore the different symbols and imagery around written messages. I’ve found many analogies between Polaroids and letters. The way you open up an envelope either with deep caution or total excitement reminds me of how one feels when tearing open the seal of a pack of instant film. To the same extent, polaroids and written letters are endangered species. Nowadays, with digital technology, we send perfectly written mails that anyone can decipher and we display flawless pictures. We used to have personal handwritings that could be difficult to understand but that made the messages all the more endearing.

Q7) Who are your favorite photographers, instant or otherwise?

A: I am deeply touched by Jane Evelyn Atwood’s portraits and I can’t get enough of Sally Mann’s ghostly landscapes. I’m really impressed by French polaroid artists such as Liliroze and Franck Juery, whose polaroids are full of poetry. My contacts on Flickr remain a constant source of visual joy and inspiration and I constantly feel humbled by so many beautiful shots. Browsing RoidWeek’s pool is also a great way to discover instant gems.

Q8) If you could take an photo of anyone or anything what would it be?

A: I’d love to take foxes or wolves in the snow…I’d love to get better at photographing men.

About Marion

“I’m a teacher and live in Paris.”

Thank you to Marion for taking part in 8 Exposures.

29
No. 441

East Village Boys - "For Personal Use" Exhibition at Impossible NYC

Patrick Tobin | 1551 days ago

Thursday, June 7th, 2012
6:00 PM to 9:00 PM
The Impossible Project NYC Space
425 Broadway
5th Floor
Between Howard & Canal Streets
Photo by Andrew Yang

Once upon a time, horny boys, pornography dilettantes, sneaky voyeurs, slutty exhibitionists, and queers of all types were confined to instant photography to document their private activities and tastes in all things a little less than appropriate. As a part of the Queer New York International Arts Festival, East Village Boys is bringing together a few of their favorite artists to create new work specifically for an exhibition at the Impossible Project’s NYC Space.

Since the deluge of digital technologies, documenting (and publishing) our secrets has never been easier, but somewhere along the way it has became less deviant, less counterculture, less provocative and a lot less interesting. The artists include both well-know and emerging photographers, musicians, performance artists, painters, and artists of all types. Through stimulating and thought provoking imagery the exhibition “For Personal Use” celebrates the history of documenting what happens behind closed doors with instant film, featuring artists Mx Justin Vivian Bond, Jeff Hahn, Jayson Keeling, Josh McNey, Christian Schoeler, SUPERM (Slava Mogutin and Brian Kenny) and Andrew Yang.

Please join us for an opening reception on Thursday, June 7th from 6PM-9PM, which will feature a soundtrack composed for this exhibition by B0DYH1GH (Daniel Portland and Max Steele).

“For Personal Use” will be on view from June 5th through June 19th, 2012

30
No. 442

Viewfinder: Ray Lego

Patrick Tobin, | 1550 days ago

Named one of the world’s best photographers by Lurzers Archive, Ray Lego loves shooting with Impossible Project film for commercial and personal projects. Some of his commercial clients include Nike, ESPN, Warner Brothers, Atlantic Records and Death+Taxes Magazine.

The Polaroid 690 is his weapon of choice and Impossible film is his ammo.

“I love the visual bombardments, from the moments of calmness to the ambush,” says Lego. “The Polaroid camera and Impossible film help me take random pictures that describe how we see – not all at once but in separate glimpses. Shooting the Impossible film on commercial projects is a great ice-breaker; the tactile and tangible quality of instant film is so unique, most subjects are in awe. On personal projects, experimentation, creativity, innovation with the film helps me push the envelope of photography.”

You can see more of Ray’s work at www.raylego.com

No. 441

East Village Boys - "For Personal Use" Exhibition at Impossible NYC

Patrick Tobin | 1551 days ago

Thursday, June 7th, 2012
6:00 PM to 9:00 PM
The Impossible Project NYC Space
425 Broadway
5th Floor
Between Howard & Canal Streets
Photo by Andrew Yang

Once upon a time, horny boys, pornography dilettantes, sneaky voyeurs, slutty exhibitionists, and queers of all types were confined to instant photography to document their private activities and tastes in all things a little less than appropriate. As a part of the Queer New York International Arts Festival, East Village Boys is bringing together a few of their favorite artists to create new work specifically for an exhibition at the Impossible Project’s NYC Space.

Since the deluge of digital technologies, documenting (and publishing) our secrets has never been easier, but somewhere along the way it has became less deviant, less counterculture, less provocative and a lot less interesting. The artists include both well-know and emerging photographers, musicians, performance artists, painters, and artists of all types. Through stimulating and thought provoking imagery the exhibition “For Personal Use” celebrates the history of documenting what happens behind closed doors with instant film, featuring artists Mx Justin Vivian Bond, Jeff Hahn, Jayson Keeling, Josh McNey, Christian Schoeler, SUPERM (Slava Mogutin and Brian Kenny) and Andrew Yang.

Please join us for an opening reception on Thursday, June 7th from 6PM-9PM, which will feature a soundtrack composed for this exhibition by B0DYH1GH (Daniel Portland and Max Steele).

“For Personal Use” will be on view from June 5th through June 19th, 2012

No. 435

Analog Feedback Night is Back!

Jon Campolo | 1556 days ago

THURSDAY, MAY 31, 2012
6:00 PM to 9:00 PM
The Impossible Project NYC Space

Let’s talk about PX, baby!

Tackling the Impossible takes time, dedication and expertise − and we can all get by with a little help from our friends. Come join in on the ever-growing Impossible community for our next monthly Analog Feedback Night.

Next Thursday, May 31st, come by the NYC Space to show off your work. Talk film and photography with like minded instant enthusiasts over a few beers. Discover new camera and film secrets, geek out and maybe even get your work featured on The Impossible Blog – this is your chance to connect with other artists and photographers involved in the instant film community!

WHEN: THURSDAY, MAY 31, 2012 6:00 PM to 9:00 PM
WHERE: Impossible Project Space NYC 425 Broadway, 5th Floor Between Howard & Canal Streets
RSVP: Email rsvp@theimpossibleproject.com or call +1 212 219 3254
FREE and open to the public!

No. 427

VARIAL & NADJARI ARTIST TALK @ THE NYC SPACE

Jon Campolo | 1563 days ago

THURSDAY, MAY 24, 2012
6:00 PM to 8:00 PM
The Impossible Project NYC Space

To celebrate the recent opening of Traces of Time, the vibrant new exhibition to open on our South wall, photographers and fellow travelers Varial and Fabrice Nadjari will visit the NYC Space to talk about their experience shooting Impossible film in the remote deserts and villages of the Wakhan corridor, Afghanistan. Guests will have the opportunity to ask the artists about their shooting and survival techniques and hear the inside story on their adventure. If you haven’t had a chance to see this unique exhibition, Traces of Time will be showing in the NYC Space until June 1st.

While you prepare your burning questions for the artists, check out their story on The New York Times LENS blog or listen to their interview on NPR!

WHEN: THURSDAY, MAY 24, 2012 from 6:00 PM to 8:00 PM
WHERE: Impossible Project Space NYC 425 Broadway, 5th Floor Between Howard & Canal Streets
RSVP: Email rsvp@theimpossibleproject.com or call +1 212 219 3254
FREE and open to the public!

No. 426

Ruvan & Kasia in Dazed Digital & at Aria London

Frank Love | 1563 days ago

MAY 18 - JUN 15, 2012
Aria’s Barnsbury Hall
Barnsbury Street
Islington
London N1 1PN
Kasia Bobula

Tonight sees the opening of a brand new Impossible exhibition at contemporary lifestyle store Aria.

The exhibition features the Impossible artworks of Ruvan Wijesooriya and Kasia Bobula.

The two artists were talking to Dazed about their analog instant experiences and thoughts – read the interview herel

No. 425

Light Night Impossible Pop-Up Shop

Frank Love | 1564 days ago

MAY 18, 2012, 5.30 - 10 pm
Open Eye
19 Mann Island
Liverpool Waterfront
Liverpool
L3 1BP

Founded in 1977 Open Eye is an independent not-for-profit photography gallery based in Liverpool. They are one of the UK’s leading photography spaces, and the only gallery dedicated to photography and related media in the North West of England.

Come along to Open Eye Gallery on Liverpool Light Night with your friends and loved ones and get snapped vintage-style! Open Eye is well and truly hooked on Impossible Project’s new instant film, so they decided to invite Incognito artist and Impossible expert Tom Wright to spread the love.

Tom is setting-up a pop up studio outside the gallery, creating gorgeous snapshots of you and yours to take away.