June 2012

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No. 443

8 Exposures...with Gian Guido Zurli

Patrick Tobin, | 1458 days ago

Photo of Gian Guido by Menico Sneider

Hello, friends. Welcome back to 8 Exposures, our instant film-themed Q&A series. This entry focuses on Italian photographer Gian Guido Zurli

Q1) What kind of Polaroid camera(s) do you use?

A: I prefer mainly the SX-70 and the Automatic 100. I have a dozen Polaroid cameras. I recently bought a Graflex Crown Graphic that I would like to use with Polaroid backs.

Q2) Why do you like instant photography?

A: I like instant photography because it is pure poetry. Digital photography is too fast, you can see the result before taking a picture. How is that satisfying? This feature is killing true photography, especially fine-art photography. I’m always impatient. So I can’t wait to come back into the darkroom to see my pictures finished. Instant photography is for me the right balance between digital and analog. It’s almost fast as digital, but with the unique and romantic flavor of analogue.

Q3) What is your earliest memory of instant film?

A: Like all those born in the 70s, I received a Polaroid 600 camera as a gift. I took some pictures during carnival celebrations with other children. A few years later I found a Polaroid camera in the basement that belonged to my father. I think it was a model 340 but I’m not sure. I wanted to use it, but at that time all the dealers in the city told me that it was not possible to find the battery. Only many years later I realized that was not true and that I could use the camera with some wonderful films. Unfortunately at that time there was no internet. Both cameras have been lost when moving to other houses. Over the years I have bought them back.

Q4) What’s your favorite Impossible film type?

A: Between the Impossible films no longer in production, I loved the PX 680 Beta, the best integral instant film of all time. It’s hard to find a preference between it and the original Time Zero. My preferred film currently produced by Impossible is the PX 70 12/11 Pioneer test batch.

Q5) What are your favorite subjects to photograph?

A: I photographed for years abandoned places, with cameras of all types. Returning to photograph with a Polaroid and then Impossible, I continued to prefer architectural photography, but also to search for images from the flavor more romantic and less dramatic. I prefer to photograph buildings over people. My photographs of architecture tend to never include human presence. If you’ll find people, they are usually portrayed in the shoulders.

Q6) Tell us about a project you’re working on.

A: Definitely I’ll photograph objects and places. At the moment I’d like to photograph the enchanted garden of Bomarzo, near Rome or the Boboli in Florence. I’d also like to photograph Paris. Who knows… maybe one day I will also photograph people.

Q7) Who are your favorite photographers, instant or otherwise?

A: I started photographing seriously after discovering photographs by Simon Marsden (recently deceased). My early work was carried out with a SLR camera and Kodak HIE infrared film, like Marsden. His photos have been for me a real source of inspiration. My first photos were in black and white, then I discovered the color with the Polaroid.

Another photographer who inspires me that I follow is Maurizio Galimberti, the most famous Polaroid artist, I’ve the pleasure to know him personally.

Other great photographers that I appreciate are Alfred Stieglitz, Ansel Adams, Michael Kenna and Luigi Ghirri. But photography can not be defined with other arts such as painting, cinema and literature. To me they are equally important Giorgio De Chirico and other metaphysical painters, the Bauhaus, David Lynch and Dino Buzzati.

Q8) If you could take a photo of anyone or anything what would it be?

A: In my opinion, there are too many disturbing elements in the urban environment. I would not photograph parked cars or billboards. Sometimes even the presence of people can disturb the scene.

About Gian Guido

“I live in Parma, Italy where I work as photographer and video editor. I’ve published many books about Apple, digital photography and video editing software. I mainly work with digital, but my heart is 100% analog.”

Thanks to Gian Guido for taking part in 8 Exposures. To see more of his photography, please visit his Flickr Photostream and be sure to follow him on Twitter at @gianguidozurli

No. 444

HOLDEN X IMPOSSIBLE CYCLE 6 WINNERS!

Patrick Tobin, | 1458 days ago

Photo by Thorsten Finner

Cycle 6 of the Holden x Impossible Timeless In An Instant photo contest has closed.

The winners of round six were chosen by Impossible’s US team.

And the winner is…

THERE IS A LIGHT THAT NEVER GOES OUT
by Thorsten Finner
Film: PX 680

And Runner Up:
LE QUEEN
by Marko Mastosaari
Film: PX 680

Congratulations to Thorsten and Marko! Each will receive an Impossible film pack and a Holden t-shirt.

Thank you very much to everyone who submitted to the Holden x Impossible Timeless In An Instant contest. Grand Prize and 1st and 2nd Runner Ups will be announced shortly!

No. 445

HOLDEN X IMPOSSIBLE CONTEST WINNERS!

Patrick Tobin, | 1458 days ago

Photo by Melanie Rodriguez

We are happy to announce the Grand Prize Winner, 1st Runner-Up and 2nd Runner-Up for the HOLDEN X IMPOSSIBLE Timeless In An Instant photo contest!

Final winners were selected by the team at Holden Outerwear

And the winners are…

Grand Prize

UNTITLED
by Melanie Rodriguez
Film: PX 70

1st Runner Up

STEFFIE MIT KONFETTI
by Dimitrios Mavroudis
Film: PX 680 Gold Edition

2nd Runner Up

SUMMER
by Dylan Boyd
Film: PX 680 Cool

Please join us in congratulating Melanie, Dimitrios and Dylan!

Thank you very much to everyone who submitted to the Holden x Impossible Timeless In An Instant contest.

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No. 446

Impossible's "Spring Comes Alive!" Photo Contest Winners

Patrick Tobin, | 1457 days ago

Photo by E. Staudacher

Congratulations to the 5 winners in our Spring Comes Alive! photo contest!

These delightful images come from E. Staudacher, Laurène Elliott, Francesca Todde, Caleb Jenkins and Justin Goode, using the following film types: PX 70, PX 600 Black Frame and PX 70 12/11 batch.

Thanks to everyone who entered. Please stay tuned for details on our next contest!

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No. 447

Impossible's Sunday Brunch - Issue 5

Patrick Tobin, | 1456 days ago

Photo by Micaela Go

Hi friends, and welcome back to Impossible’s Sunday Brunch. Each week, we’ll be posting 5 tasty photos that caught our eye over the past week.

This week, we present you with a special Portrait Edition of Sunday Brunch, featuring photos by Micaela Go, Meredith Wilson, Andrea Buia, Erdal Kahraman and Troy Bradford

Images were taken with the following film types: PX 100 Cool, PX 70 Nigo Edition, PX 680 Gold Edition and PX 70 Cool

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No. 448

Dr. Love's Tips: Shooting In Hot Weather

Patrick Tobin, | 1455 days ago

Welcome back to Dr. Love’s Tips, our ever-popular series in which Impossible USA’s Camera Resource Manager provides advice to help you get the most out of your instant film experience. This week, Dr. Love focuses on shooting in hot weather…

Now that most everyone is enjoying warmer weather, and with the introduction of our COOL Films, a lot of people have been asking about best practices for shooting on those balmy summer days.

Just to start, COOL film is meant to be stored cool for best results, but once you’re taking it out to go shoot, you do NOT need to carry along a little lunch cooler to keep the film at a refrigerated temperature. That said, if you’re going out on especially hot days, and plan to be outside for a while, with COOL films or not, you will likely want to take some precaution so that the heat won’t affect the film.

The simplest thing is just minimizing exposure to the heat. There are some basic concepts like: don’t leave anything out of your bag in direct sun or on hot pavement. If you want to take it a step further, I find using a proper padded camera bag works really well. The padding in the bag works as a natural insulation, so when you’re leaving the safety of an air conditioned home or shop, the bag will take longer to heat up to the outside temperature. If you’re going to be out for a while, you can slow this process down more by not leaving the bag open and not having your camera out of the bag for an excessive amount of time.

If you’re still concerned about the heat and think it gets too hot too fast, another thing you can do is put a very small ice pack in your padded camera bag. You should be sure to wrap it in a towel so it doesn’t get your bag wet, but this will keep your bag a lot cooler for longer. I should point out you shouldn’t keep anything up against the ice pack, as while you do wanna keep the film from getting too hot, you don’t want to have too drastic of temperature differences between your bag and outside, which could cause the optics in your camera to fog up. If you carry the ice pack I actually do recommend you keep your bag open a little so it doesn’t turn your bag into an outright cooler.

You can apply the same concepts to your film as well, be it before, during, or after shooting. As it states on the COOL film packaging, they should acclimate to room temp before you actually use them. This is because the film doesn’t want to be cold when you’re actually shooting because of how it will affect processing. Too much heat however can also affect the processing, so having a pocket in your bag that is out of direct sun, or kept a medium temp from the ice pack nearby, can be a good place to keep images during and especially after processing depending on how you want to affect the image with temperature.

In short, the best plan of action for shooting on hot days is simply minimize exposure to any temperature extremes. Padded camera bags are a simple and effective tool to help with this, and adding an ice pack properly can give you hours outside without worrying about how the heat may affect your film. Now get out there! Enjoy the beaches, parks, and pools and happy shooting.

Keep your rollers clean,

-f

No. 449

Patrick Winfield's Photogram Workshop Returns!

Patrick Tobin, | 1455 days ago

Tuesday, June 12, 2012
7 - 8:30 pm
Impossible Project Space NYC
425 Broadway
5th Floor
New York NY 10013

Acclaimed artist and designer Patrick Winfield will return to the Impossible Project NYC Space to present his fascinating and distinctive photogram workshop. Well known for his vivid composites and alternative processes, Patrick will demonstrate his personal instant photogram technique with the Impossible film medium.

In this stimulating class, Patrick will outline a brief history of the photogram and the fundamentals of the process. Delving into the importance of film speed, exposures and the unique integral film process, you will leave this tutorial with stunning hand made instant images. Attendees will be supplied with one pack of Impossible color film, a Polaroid 600 camera, flashlights, transparencies and colored gels. You’re welcome to bring your own photogram objects also!

Workshop fee is $95 (price includes 1 pack PX 70 Color Shade 12/11)

To register, please call (212) 219 3254 or email nycspace@theimpossibleproject.com

No. 450

Do The Divot! Contest Winners

Patrick Tobin, | 1455 days ago

Photo by Dave Knapik

Never let it be said that Impossible photographers don’t enjoy a good challenge!

We tasked photographers shooting with divot-prone old generation Impossible film to post their most creative divot shots to our Impossible Photo Challenges flickr group. The results were amazing and we had a devil of a time trying to select the 3 winners.

They are:

First Prize
Dave Knapik
http://www.daveknapik.com/

2nd Prize
Zia Kahn
http://ziakhan.tumblr.com/

3rd prize
Peter Lombardi
http://www.peterlombardi.com/

Thanks to everyone who took part!

No. 451

Impossible's 600 Camera Workshop Returns!

Patrick Tobin, | 1455 days ago

Sunday, June 10th, 2012
10:00 AM to 1:00 PM
Impossible Project Space
425 Broadway
5th Floor
New York
NY 10013
Photo by James Matthew Carroll

Continuing our Impossible Workshop series, we are pleased to announce the return of a classic workshop on one of our favorite cameras, the Polaroid 600 camera. The Impossible Project will hold a three hour interactive workshop on maximizing Impossible film in the Polaroid 600 Camera.

In the workshop, participants will be guided through the ins and outs of the Polaroid 600 series camera with a knowledgeable Impossible expert staffer. Workshop participants will learn introductory and intermediate techniques to master their 600 camera including exposure and functionality. The workshop will include an in depth overview of shooting Impossible Project film including light shielding, temperature control and image preservation.

Workshop participants will be led on an interactive photo walk with one of Impossible’s experienced staff photographers, capturing the photogenic charm of downtown New York as they explore SOHO, Chinatown and Little Italy. The group will then reconvene back at the space to review images, ask questions and talk about image storage and preservation.

Fee is $50 (price includes 1 pack PX 680 Color Shade COOL film & Frog Tongue)

To register, please call (212) 219 3254 or email nycspace@theimpossibleproject.com
Please notify when registering if you’d like to borrow a camera at no extra cost.

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No. 452

8 Exposures...with Pierre Manning

Patrick Tobin, | 1454 days ago

Hello again, 8 Exposures fans. This week, we are happy to bring you Canadian photographer Pierre Manning

1) What kind of Polaroid camera(s) do you use?

SX-70

2) Why do you like instant photography?

The suprise, the tones, the richness of colors.

3) What is your earliest memory of instant film?

I remember my mother gave me my first Polaroid and it was a revelation for me to see my images developing in front of my eyes.

4) What’s your favorite Impossible film type?

PX-70. I also liked Polaroid’s Fade To Black that Impossible sold.

5) What are your favorite subjects to photograph?

Women ;-)

6) Tell us about a project you’re working on.

Shooting for a footwear company . 6 days of shooting and working with the SX-70 for inserts.

7) Who are your favorite photographers, instant or otherwise?

Richard Avedon / Nick Knight

8) If you could take a photo of anyone or anything what would it be?

Charlize Theron.

About Pierre

Photographer and partner, known for his portraits, his light, his efficiency, his organizational abilities, his speed, and his sense of humour. A Swiss Army Knife in the studio, he keeps up the morale of the troops, is outspoken, and sings old hit songs. Wouldn’t trade the gang, the cyclo, the terrace, his parking space, and team meetings for anything else. Founder and member of the image makers since 1989.

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No. 453

Viewfinder: Amber Mahoney's "Present Company Project"

Patrick Tobin, | 1453 days ago

Hello again, Viewfinder fans. We are happy to deliver another exciting issue to your doorstep! This week, we turn our lens on Amber Mahoney, creator of The Present Company Project

My name is Amber Mahoney and I’m a documentary, fashion and alternative wedding photographer based out of DC and NYC.

I started The Present Company Project as a challenge to myselfI wanted to have a genuine interaction with someone I might otherwise never know. I wanted to stop fitting people into my world, but rather see them as they are. I thought if I could connect with others on this level it might make me a better artist, and more so, a better person. It started when I met Tyrone, just having my mind blown by a complete stranger, and grew from there.

So I’ve started carrying a Polaroid camera with me everywhere. When I see someone I’d like to know, I ask if I can take their photo. If they say yes, I ask: “If you could ask a perfect stranger anything in the world, what would it be?” or “What is one thing you’d like people to know about you?” I usually blush and get a bit flustered, but it’s been a pretty rad ride and I’m not sure how I’m going to decide when it’s time to call it quits.

I’ve also decided to open Present Company up to submissions because I’d love to start a kind of mini-movement around thiscreating/realizing connections between “others” and ourselves. If you’d like to be a part of The Present Company Project please submit your photos and stories here! I’d love to see the people you meet.

I’m in love with Impossible film. It’s dreamy and unpredictable in the most beautiful ways – the bursts of color, creamy skin tones, temperature sensitivities and (as seen on Susie’s polaroid) the occasional ghost orb.

“There isn’t anyone you couldn’t love once you’ve heard their story.” – Mary Lou Kownacki

To see more of Amber’s work, please visit her website and to keep up to date with The Present Company Project, visit www.thepresentcompanyproject.com

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No. 454

Analog Feedback in MAY

Frank Love, | 1452 days ago

Our mission to create a real life Flickr forum for instant enthusiasts in New York is taking shape. Our NYC Space hosted the second Analog Feedback Night in May and attracted all sorts of talented artists to show their work.

Sharing tips and discussing techniques about Impossible instant film and Vintage Polaroid cameras over a few beers will be a monthly event. We’re building an enthusiastic support community for analog minded photographers. Whether you are an established commercial photographer or just starting out, we all have knowledge to impart.

In May, we learned from veterans like Bruce Fraidowitz, who shared his experiences with the old Polaroid roll film types and then presented his mixed media work with both Impossible and Polaroid zinc materials.

13 yr old Evan Cerda impressed us with his beautifully composed instants and passion for analog photography in a digital age.

In this re-cap, we would like to share some images from the photographers in attendance. Thanks for coming Adam Custins, Dave Knapik, Tim Dansereau, Mike Brown, Elise Huston, Bruce Fraidowitz and Evan Cerda.

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No. 455

NYC SPACE - JAM PACKED IN JUNE!!

Patrick Tobin, | 1452 days ago

Get excited, New York! The Impossible Project NYC Space has a HUGE month of photographic fun planned for June! Inspiring new exhibition openings, workshops galore and a photo festival. It’s time to capture New York City Summer in a colorful instant!
————————————————————————-
TONIGHT
The EAST VILLAGE BOYS present “FOR PERSONAL USE

As a part of the Queer New York International Arts Festival, the infamous East Village Boys are bringing together their favorite artists to create For Personal Use to celebrate New York City’s historical queer community through outrageous and thought provoking imagery, opening Thursday June 7, 2102 at The Impossible Project NYC Space.

WHEN: THURSDAY, JUNE 7, 2012 6:00 PM to 9:00 PM
To RSVP, email rsvp@theimpossibleproject.com or call +1 212 219 3254
FREE and open to the public!

—————————————————————————

THE IMPOSSIBLE 600 WORKSHOP!

Back by popular demand, we’re pleased to announce the return of the 600 Workshop! See here for details!

WHEN: SUNDAY, JUNE 10, 2012 10:00 AM to 1:00 PM

To register, email nycspace@theimpossibleproject.com or call +1 212 219 3254

FEE: $ 50 (includes 1 pack PX 680 Color Shade COOL & Frog Tongue)
Please notify when registering if renting a camera at no extra cost

————————————————————————————————

The PHOTOGRAM WORKSHOP with Patrick Winfield

Acclaimed artist and designer Patrick Winfield will return to the Impossible Project NYC Space to present his fascinating and distinctive photogram workshop. See here for more info.

WHEN: TUESDAY, JUNE 12, 2012 7:00 PM to 8:30 PM

To register, email nycspace@theimpossibleproject.com or call +1 212 219 3254

FEE: $95 (includes all film & tools for workshop)

——————————————————————————
RYAN NABULSI”:http://www.ryannabulsi.com/ – “Manipulating The Science of Chance”

A solo exhibition by photographer Ryan Nabulsi, focussing on intersections between science and art, using multiple photographic technologies to create new forms of photography. Nabulsi’s work abstracts the chemistry of Impossible Project film using a variety of camera-less techniques. Watch this space for more info.

Workshop – Scanning with Ryan Nabulsi
Ryan Nabulsi will also lead a hands-on workshop on how to achieve high quality scans for large-scale prints from their Impossible Images on a limited budget. Watch this space for more info.

EXHIBITION OPENING JUNE 21st 6:00 PM – 9:00 PM
FREE and open to the public
EXHIBITION on VIEW: JUNE 21st – JULY 31st

WORKSHOP: JUNE 24th 2:00PM – 4:00 PM

FEE: $ 50 (includes 1 pack PX 680 Color Shade COOL & Frog Tongue)

—————————————————————————————————-

IMPOSSIBLE @ PHOTOVILLE

The Impossible Project NYC Space joins the Photoville Festival in Dumbo for two weekends in June with a pop up shop, FREE workshops and talks. Check the Photoville website’s schedule for more details.

WHEN:
FRIDAY, JUNE 22nd – 24th
THURSDAY, JUNE 28th – JULY 1st 2012

——————————————————————————————————

ANALOG FEEDBACK NIGHT JUNE 26TH

Our monthly evening for instant photography enthusiasts to share their latest work on Impossible film!
Check out our blog to see who showed up in May!

WHEN: THURSDAY, MAY 31, 2012 6:00 PM to 9:00 PM

To RSVP, email rsvp@theimpossibleproject.com or call +1 212 219 3254

FREE and open to the public!

No. 456

8 Exposures...with Laura Alice Watt

Patrick Tobin, | 1451 days ago

Welcome back to 8 Exposures, our instant film Q&A series. This week, we bring you California-based Laura Alice Watt

Q1) What kind of Polaroid camera(s) do you use?

A: The workhorse is my trusty SLR 680, looking a bit worse for wear these days as it’s usually my travel Polaroid. It’s kept company by a tan SX-70 (such an elegant creation!), a Spectra and an Automatic 250, plus packfilm camera backs for the Hasselblad and, most recently, Crown Graphic. Plenty of fine cams to choose from!

Q2) Why do you like instant photography?

A: There’s of course the relatively-instant gratification (compared to regular film, not digital) of seeing them develop, and the sheer tangibility of a pola, that it’s both an image and an object; for me, the biggest allure is the way these cameras and films “see.” Light glows differently through instant film than through any other kind, there’s just nothing else like it—all those Pola-Droid apps are sad, sad imitations at best—real instant film provides a unique and characteristic view of the world, a way of seeing the subject that directly enhances and contributes to its beauty or intrigue. And I like that sense of interaction, not only between photographer and subject but also through the distinctive medium of the film—and of course the serendipity.

Q3) What is your earliest memory of instant film?

A: I’m perhaps a bit unusual among instant photographers, in that I don’t have any nostalgic memories of polaroids from the past; both of my parents are fairly serious amateur photographers, and didn’t hold Polaroid in very high esteem when I was a kid, so my first camera was an Instamatic, followed by a Pentax. I suppose my earliest memory of instant film was seeing friends’ polaroids at school, but my first real experience with instant film was only five or six years ago, when I bought a One600 Ultra after admiring friends’ polaroids on Flickr. That was quickly replaced by a Spectra given to me by the fabulous Cate Rachford (later a co-founder of ‘Roid Week), who couldn’t stand seeing me not have a “real” Polaroid camera, and suddenly instant film and I took off together.

Q4) What’s your favorite Impossible film type?

A: I’m not sure I’ve settled on a favorite yet – they’ve all had their moments! Although I have to admit, I couldn’t care less about the frames; what’s important is the film. I was honored to be one of the testers of the very first incarnations of what became PX 100 and PX 600, and the sheer delight of NEW INSTANT FILM, after Polaroid’s unhappy demise, can’t be measured. The first beta-batch of PX 680 was pretty extraordinary, popping with clear rich colors. I still sometimes miss the weird misty-blues of the early PX 70, before “Push” came along (I’ve just never been a big one for pinks and purples). When the monochrome films work just right, they’re hauntingly, unreproduceably beautiful. And I’m always curious about the next batch that Impossible might cook up, especially as they’re honing in on improved stability and clarity—plus secretly wishing they can reinvent Choco 100 somehow…!!

Q5) What are your favorite subjects to photograph?

A: Hmm…I seem to take a lot of pictures of water, although not so many recently. Lots of trees, and rambling landscapes. Hard to go wrong with a magnolia. My REAL favorite subjects are my niece and nephew, but they live on the other side of the continent, so we don’t work together as often as I’d like! And if it seems like it’ll make an interesting photograph, I’ll try almost any subject.

Q6) Tell us about a project you’re working on.

A: I moved into a new house last year, and it’s nestled in among these truly fantastic oak trees, all twisty and gnarled branches reaching in every direction—so I seem to photographing them a bunch. Not sure they’re quite a project yet. I’ve also been slowly assembling a group of pastoral images, trying to convey the deep relationships between people and the land they work with—and trying (not necessarily succeeding, mind you) to portray them without getting lost in too much nostalgia or rosy-eyed romance. Instant films, of various sorts, seem to fit that project better than other mediums, although I’m gradually learning some alt-process printing methods, too.

Q7) Who are your favorite photographers, instant or otherwise?

A: Hard to choose, there are so many amazing ones! In my stack of photo-books, I keep reaching back to the Carleton Watkins images of the early early west, to Tina Modotti’s incredibly clear-eyed portraits, to Sally Mann’s heart-drenched landscapes and family chronicles. I think it was a Michael Kenna photo-calendar that I stumbled across years ago that first made me realize that “nature” photography was not restricted to Sierra Club calendars. And I’m kind of obsessed lately by Lynn Davis’ icebergs, plus the incredible flowers of Ron van Dongen. I’m a big photo-fan.

But mostly I’m a fan of the people who I sometimes go photographing WITH—Nick Morrison and Cate Rachford here in the Bay Area, Rom in NYC—they inspire me to see more, and differently, and there’s nothing better than a day spent out and about with cameras. And always looking forward to going shooting with someone new.

Q8) If you could take a photo of anyone or anything what would it be?

A: Whatever’s in front of me that seems intriguing…I’m easy.

About Laura

“I’m a professor of environmental studies and planning at Sonoma State University, at the northern end of the San Francisco Bay Area—where I’ve lived (in a variety of zip codes) since I was two, and have been photographing since I was eight.”

Thanks to Laura for taking part! To see more of her photography, please visit her Flickr Photostream and follow her on Twitter at @lawatt

No. 457

The Spectrum Collection - Call for Submissions

Frank Love | 1451 days ago

by Alan Marcheselli, Andrew Millar, Alex Kueper, Andrea Tonellotto

Dedicated to the wide spectrum of Color Shades and Images is our upcoming collaboration with renowned publisher Random House, Inc. Together we will be publishing a collection of postcards entitled The Spectrum Collection. This collection will highlight the vibrancy of Impossible film and its ability to capture a multitude of colors. 50 selected images will be featured in a foldable gift box, designed as a Polaroid camera and worldwide available in summer 2013.

The publishers of Random House will select the best 50 images that best capture ONE particular color with an eye for creative composition. Each photographer with an image used in this Impossible/Random House collaboration will be given one free postcard box, a coupon code for one Impossible film pack from our online shop and the admiration of instant film photographers worldwide!

-> We are looking for PX format images only.
-> Submission deadline is July 15, 2012.
-> Winners will be notified via E-Mail and receive a release form.

UPLOAD HERE until 15 July 2012

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No. 458

Impossible's Sunday Brunch - Issue 6

Patrick Tobin, | 1449 days ago

Photo by Sarah Kirkham

Happy Sunday, Impossibles! Welcome back to Sunday Brunch, where we share with you 5 photographic treats that caught our eye over the past week.

This week, we wanted to focus on animals! These furry critters belong to Sarah Kirkham, Melissa Mohd Nor, Terry Hare, Brad Brok and Scott Hoffman

This week’s images were taken on the following film types: PX 70 Cool, PX 70 Nigo and PZ 680.

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No. 459

The Scanning Workshop with Ryan Nabulsi

Josie Keefe, | 1448 days ago

June 24th, 2012 2-4 pm
Impossible Project NYC Space
425 Broadway
5th Floor
New York
NY 10013

Want to make the most of your Impossible images? Want to get professional quality scans on an amateur budget? Take your image reproduction to the next level with our brand new scanning workshop. We are pleased to have our new exhibition artist, Ryan Nabulsi teaching The Scanning Workshop, on Sunday, June 24th, 2012 from 2-4pm. The workshop will cover the ins and outs of scanning, and will teach students how to get the most out of their home scanners. Nabulsi will cover resolution, bit depth, levels, histograms, color balance, newton rings, and the importance of making adjustments before scanning. Additionally, students will walk away with knowledge of how to create high resolution archival images from digital murals, prints, and web/email with limited equipment. Each student is asked to bring in at least one image from their Impossible collection and a high capacity flash drive (8gb) so that they can take home a scan of their image. Nabulsi will just be offering the workshop this month, so don’t miss your chance to learn how to optimize your scans.

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No. 460

8 Exposures...with Daniel G. Fuster

Patrick Tobin, | 1447 days ago

Welcome back to 8 Exposures, our instant film Q&A series. This week, our featured photographer is Daniel G. Fuster

1) What kind of Polaroid camera(s) do you use?

A great thing about instant photography is that cameras are usually easy to find and quite affordable. I have to admit to having many of them, but, at the end, I usually stick to an old SX-70 Sonar and a more recent SLR 690 camera. These last weeks I am also using a flashy blue Impulse.

2) Why do you like instant photography?

I like its colours, the texture, the frame, the way it captures light, but the fact that you can see – and touch – the result immediately is to me, the best thing about instant photography. I also enjoy the difficulties that this kind of photography has, in terms of need of light, limited capacity to use lens, etc. as I believe that this brings more simplicity and spontaneity to pictures. I also like the nostalgic feeling that this material often has, not to say the accidental trait that, time to time, does appear.

3) What is your earliest memory of instant film?

My grandmother bought a Polaroid camera in the early eighties, and she used to take pictures of both my sister and me in the summertime. Since then, I have always associated instant film with holidays, family, friends and plenty of sun. Some years later, I was lucky enough to find this camera in an old cabinet, and then my passion towards instant photography immediately began!

4) What’s your favorite Impossible film type?

I have to say that using Impossible film has been like learning a new language, with its difficulties and its joys. I am currently using a lot of the PX 100 Silver Shade UV+ film. I love it, and I think that in brings the best black & white results ever had on integral film.

5) What are your favorite subjects to photograph?

I have to admit that I am fond of subjects that can be considered as being quite boring! I love big buildings, empty streets, old cars, open landscapes, lonely trees, in fact I think that like anything related to loneliness. Ah, and I also love to take pictures of shadows and reflections.

6) Tell us about a project you’re working on

Besides my flickr account and my blog on instant photography, I recently started a new blog in which pictures are always taken through the same window. I feel quite happy with the results, as I believe that it shows how rich, diverse and exciting can be instant film. I recently also tried to mix music and instant photography.

7) Who are your favorite photographers, instant or otherwise?

I like many photographers, such as Joachim Brohm, William Eggleston, Jeff Wall, but I had to choose one, I would definitively pick Bernard Plossu. I love all his work, and more particularly his travelling photography in black & white. I also enjoy a lot following the work of contemporary instant photographers and, in that respect, flickr and polanoid provide a unique opportunity to access to beautiful instant photography.

8) If you could take a photo of anyone or anything what would it be?

I would have loved to take a picture of Buster Keaton, but I guess that I am a little too late for this…More than specific subjects, I have countries to which I would like to bring my camera, like Vietnam, Morocco, Madagascar, Peru, Bolivia and many others. Another subject on which I would like to work is a series of hand portraits.

About Daniel

Daniel G Fuster is from Barcelona, Spain, and he is currently living in Madrid. Analogue enthusiast, he devotes his free time to instant photography and super 8 films.

To see more of Daniel’s photography, please visit his Flickr photostream. You can also follow him on Twitter at @dfuster74

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No. 461

Viewfinder: Lorenzo Papadia's "Fade Point"

Patrick Tobin, | 1446 days ago

Welcome back to Viewfinder, our series focusing on interesting projects that incorporate Impossible film. This entry brings you Italian photographer Lorenzo Papadia

I live and work in Italy as a photographer and my main occupation is to organize workshops and teach in photography schools. I create themed series of pictures, starting from an accurate analysis of reality, taking pictures of common objects, indoor environments, or urban places. ‘My’ reality is resorted out through my camera, so that it can reflect the great chaos generated by our life nowadays, which usually results in over-elaborated pictures. I think a photographer’s role is to give the observer all the instruments they need to analyze details, even common ones, which are usually ignored as the sight flies to other distractions.

My aim is to focus on details as if I were a child, amazed by new things the world has to offer. In other words, taking pictures becomes a further step in perceiving things so that I can get through their essence. The Polaroid and instant film help me in overtaking reality, making the result more similar to a painting. I love the quickness of this medium, what I can synthesize thanks to it, thanks to its simplicity.

These images come from my beaches of southern Italy, a land of the south, called Salento. My project is titled, “Fade Point”, which can also be intended as the point of disappearence. This is because I believe in the strong evanescence of things, beyond the appearance of which everything ceases to be “true.” In the digital age we are all obsessed by the high fidelity of the image, the so-called “quality”. I believe photography should be lacking in the perfection of its materiality. I think the instant photography today may turn away from this “surplus visibility”, providing us with a more poetic view as it envelopes the concept in a veil of mystery and secrecy… As you can see there are pictures in which all the architectures (man made) and the colors dominate the scene. The sea, almost always is the background, recall the flow of thoughts, in a dreamlike manner…

To see more of Lorenzo’s work, visit his website at http://lorenzopapadia.weebly.com/

No. 462

Impossible Under Water

Frank Love | 1446 days ago

Jan from the Impossible IT Team recently went to the coast of Croatia for some freediving. Besides his diving googles he also took an underwater protective housing for Polaroid cameras with him!

The bad news is it’s leaking, good news is that he managed to take a few good shots anyway!

14
No. 463

How to do 4 shots in 1 shot

Frank Love | 1445 days ago

NOTE FROM IMPOSSIBLE:
Remove the small plastic strip on the dark slide tab before you put the full dark slide back in!

No. 464

Ryan Nabulsi - 'Manipulating the Science of Chance'

Josie Keefe, | 1445 days ago

June 21st 2012, 6-9pm
425 Broadway, 5th Floor, New York, NY 10013

This month we are pleased to have the talented artist Ryan Nabulsi in the NYC Project Space for two special events. Nabulsi will present a solo exhibition of his work on our south wall, in the exhibition ‘Manipulating the Science of Chance”

Nabulsi’s work focuses on the intersection of science and art, using multiple photographic technologies to create new forms of image making. By opening the pack to the light, Nabulsi destroys any representational potential that the image could possibly have; no actual photograph could exist on the material. All that is visible after is the chemistry and the marks left within the material. The process is based somewhat on chance. As The Impossible Project refined their film, Nabulsi color palettes changed from only cream and orange with the first versions of Silver Shade film to the wild blues, greens, oranges and reds that appear with the newer Color Shade films.

The exhibition will be on view June 21- July 31st, 2012.

The opening will take place Thursday June 24th, 6-9pm, with the artist present and live DJ Jon Campolo.

No. 465

What's Up? The Impossible Calendar!

Frank Love | 1445 days ago

Analog instant photography allows for creation – not only of unique photographs, but also of once-in-a-liftetime events, gatherings and occurrences. To find out what passionate analog Impossible fans are up to all over the world and how Impossible instant film materials are called into action, we are proud to present the new Impossible Calendar.

It does not only allow you to find out all about happenings dedicated to analog instant photography, but also enables you to SUBMIT YOUR ANALOG INSTANT EVENT like an exhibition, a film screening, a workshop, a radio /tv tipp etc.

Make your event visible and discover other occasions at this one-and-only worldwide platform dedicated to real-life events on analog instant photography.

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No. 466

8 Exposures...with Justin Craigen

Patrick Tobin, | 1444 days ago

Hi there, Impossibles. Welcome back to 8 Exposures, our instant film Q&A series. This week, we’re happy to bring you one of the original members of the Save Polaroid movement, Justin Craigen

1) What kind of Polaroid camera(s) do you use?

SX-70 Alpha 1 Model 1, SX-70 Model 1 Sonar, Spectra, 450, and a pinhole camera with a packfilm back.

2) Why do you like instant photography?

It’s a variety of reasons. One that has been particularly important is the social aspect of the medium. Instant photos are, more than any other type, perfect for sharing with others. More importantly, getting involved with instant photography has brought me into contact with a large number of absolutely wonderful and inspiring people that otherwise, I would have likely never met. I’ve had the pleasure of meeting a handful of them in person, and so far all are as good, or better, in the flesh.

There’s also the element of unpredictability that comes with the medium. It forces the photographer into a zone where the varying degree of lack of control is embraced. And with Impossible’s in-house produced films, there has been a real effort required to get predictable results. It’s much less of a struggle now, but even so, I find that the emotional payoff of a successful image is significantly greater than with other types of film, or digital photography.

I also enjoy the manipulations that can be done—partly for aesthetics, and partly because once a manipulation is made, there’s no going back. The unique nature of each shot forces the manipulator to commit to the process in a way that digital manipulation is totally lacking. Go too far, and there’s no recovering the original shot. If you screw up, that’s it. It’s gone. And then the process of deciding if there’s still a valid image in the result begins.

3) What is your earliest memory of instant film?

In high school, a friend had a 600 camera and was taking some photos of classmates. Nice stuff, not just nudie stuff. Some of that too, though, which is a reputation that can be hard to get away from with the medium.

4) What’s your favorite Impossible film type?

Oh…god. One of the early test film batches that I was a test photographer for, I think it was Type 42. That was temperamental, but when it clicked, I still think it was the most lovely of the b&w films (even if it was, under some lighting, more sepia than true b&w).

Also Fade to Black, Artistic Time Zero, and the Chocolate and Sepia pack film. Technically, yes, Polaroid stuff, but Polaroid would never have done anything other than trash the materials without TIP. So, nuts to Polaroid, those (along with the Blue 100) are TIP film in my eyes.

Fade to Black and Type 42 then, are my favourite Impossible films. I hope that the factory crew can pull of a miracle and give us something comparable to FtB someday. I would rather have that than a true Time Zero replacement, personally (boy, I bet I will get some raised eyebrows with that statement).

5) What are your favorite subjects to photograph?

Landscapes, architecture, and still lives. Still lifes? Those too. I’ve never been a big fan of doing portraiture, but that has slowly been something that’s becoming more interesting to me.

6) Tell us about a project you’re working on.

I’ve never done a formal project. I’ve always felt that it would take some of the fun out of photography for me, and I got into it for a fun creative escape from the university design studio setting—no deadlines, no project guidelines, no restrictions. I would like to take portraits of the group of instant shooters that I have become closest to, though. Fantastic looking people, all of ‘em.

7) Who are your favorite photographers, instant or otherwise?

I’m leaving far too many people out…but here goes (grab a snack):

Chris Paquette and Grant Hamilton are two I have to mention first as it was features of their work (in the same issue of JPG magazine) that got me interested in photography, particularly instant photography. Both had work that was far from what I associated with instant film, and were directly responsible for the start of my own addiction. A Flickr user that many will be familiar with is The Gentleman Amateur—fantastically moody work that evokes cinematic stills. Andy Jenkins. Ben Parks. Kelly Knaga. Cait Youngquist. Lou Noble. Tod Brilliant. Annie Bowerman. Sol Lange. Flickrer pennyfelts. Whitney Johnson and Dave Tuttle (slowly merging into one photographic super-power). Sandra (lavueltaaldia on Flickr). Sean Tubridy. Kate Pulley. Ritchard Ton. Trask Bedortha. Laura Watt. Leah Reich. Dan Ryan. Enrique Woolfolk. Rebekka Guoleifsdottir (that’s without the Icelandic accents). Reilly Lievers. Phil Bebbington (Flickr’s fantastic Terrorkitten). Gary Isaacs. Jeff Rinehart. Katie West. Patrick Schmidt. Kristamas Klousch. original_ann and her sister sMacshots. Michael Kenna. Nicholas Hughes. Adam Makarenko. Bill Vaccaro. Jason Evans (The Daily Nice). Kris Brandhagen. Kris Brandhagen (she’s worth mentioning twice). The usual classic masters.

8) If you could take a photo of anyone or anything what would it be?

Oh…portraits of more of the fine folks that I have met through the medium (so far, I’ve taken two, and only one was actually good). Maybe a double rainbow. My fantastic and wonderfully photogenic roommate. More cats. Sexy vintage cars. Mountains. Lakes. Rivers. Oceans. Beaches. Beach babes. Beach dudes. Fancy pipes. Tattoos. John Waters. Edwin Land’s ghost. Rabbits. Roosters. Old buildings. Old people. Bacon. Nothing at all. Everything.

About Justin

Justin is currently living in Saskatchewan, working as a freelance graphic designer. He thinks the film vs digital argument is ridiculous, and prefers the Rolling Stones to the Beatles.

To see more of Justin’s work, please visit his Flickr photostream

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No. 467

The Camera Museum: Polaroid Supercolor 635

Patrick Tobin, | 1443 days ago

The Supercolor 635 was one of many variations in the simple plastic-bodied 600 camera line featuring the Light Management System. Polaroid released so many slightly different iterations in this line of cameras. This particular model has a silver face in place of the more common black face of Supercolors, and contains no sliding close-up lens.

A basic 600-series camera, the Supercolor 635 features a 116mm single-element plastic lens, fixed focus with a minimal focal length of 4 feet, electronic shutter and a built-in electronic flash. It is similar to the Sun 600 series in design, except for the beloved rainbow stripe which would be a characteristic true of the later Supercolor 635 CL edition as well.

The Supercolor 635 works with any of Impossible’s 600-speed film. For a complete selection of compatible films, click HERE

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No. 468

Impossible's Sunday Brunch - Issue 7

Patrick Tobin, | 1442 days ago

Photo by Nick Tonkin

Happy Sunday, Impossibles! Welcome back to Sunday Brunch, where we share with you 5 tasty photos that caught our eye over the past week.

This week’s images come to you from Nick Tonkin, Azuree Wiitala, Rudy Ramos, Emanuela De Toffani and Kumiko Sekiguchi.

Photos were taken using the following film types: PX70 Cool, PX 70 Nigo, PX 680 Cool and PX 680 Gold Edition.

Get out there and snap away! We may spy one of YOUR Impossible gems and want to use it in a future Sunday Brunch!

18
No. 469

Dr. Love's Tips: Dry Age Revisited

Patrick Tobin, | 1441 days ago

Welcome back to Dr. Love’s Tips, where Impossible USA’s Camera Resource Manager Frank Love provides you with advice on how to get the best out of your Impossible images. This week: Dry Age Revisited.

We wanted to give a follow up to our initial post which explains the use of the Dry Age Kit with our films.

As the weather has gotten warmer for many of you, we wanted to remind people of the importance of care for their images to ensure the best results stay that way. If you look to the original Dry Aging post, it explains the principal concept and cause for shifting, but we want to get more specific to ensure people can execute the best practices for preservation.

Using only one method or another is never a guarantee that the images are going to be unaffected. The CORE issue is the film drying.

Everyone must remember that the films…as with anything…are affected by the environment in which they are in. If the films are left ‘to dry’ in a very humid environment, this will mean they either will take very long to dry, or won’t dry completely.

Leaving the frames upright, cutting ‘vents’ (described here), and storing them in a dry space (like the dry age kit) all helps…

BUT…none of these do it if it’s too humid.

Even the dry age kit can fail if not monitored and used correctly. Say if the silica already has some moisture in it and you have very humid air when you seal it up, it may reach saturation after a day or so and then stop absorbing moisture. The first couple of days are the most important.

It’s all about DRYing the film, and the key to this is speed. Regardless of the method(s) you’re using, you need to take an active role in monitoring your film until you have a reliable method that works for your environment, and note changes. The faster the film dries, the better.

Depending on the environment (mainly humidity) you live in, you need to find out WHICH or what COMBINATION of techniques work for you there.

For someone who lives in 20% humidity and has success simply standing the images upright, and you live in 70-80%…..simply doing this may not work on its own.

You can always check your frames by putting them in the palm of your hand, and pressing them lightly with your thumb in the center. You’ll see right after you take a shot it’s very soft and pliable. If you pick up an old frame, you’ll see it’s much stiffer. Your frames should feel a little stiff, or at least not as soft, after about 2-3 days. If they are still as soft as when you shot them, then they aren’t drying as well as they should be. To know when your images are dry or ‘cured’, use the stiffness of the image as a gauge for this over how long they have been left to dry as there won’t be any set period of time.

So keep your images dry, and of course, your rollers clean,

-f

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No. 470

Impossible Partner Store Manchester

Frank Love | 1440 days ago

After quietly opening on the edge of Manchester’s Northern Quarter in 2010, Incognito has become the destination for instant and analogue film in Manchester. Combining a quirky line in gifts and oddities with a passion for Polaroid film and analogue technology has seen a community build around the store.

Time has come for a re-launch as an Impossible Partner Store. Whilst Incognito still maintains its unique identity they hope to promote a love of instant film and desire to keep analogue breathing in a digital age. Workshops, exhibitions, tutorials, and parties are central to their outlook. They want to share their passion with Manchester’s burgeoning analogue community.

The basement of the store has seen exhibitions including cult Texan musician Daniel Johnston and Glossop artist James Chadderton’s Manchester Apocalypse and is now reopening with a Polaroid museum. Enjoy the glory of the early days of Polaroid and Edwin Land right through to the reproduction under the Impossible Project banner.

OPENING HOURS
Mo – Fri 10: am – 5.30pm
Sa : 11am – 5.30pm

CONTACT
Phone: 0161 228 7999
www.incognito-uk.co.uk
Facebook, Twitter

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No. 471

Viewfinder: Dylan Boyd's "Abandoned Oklahoma"

Patrick Tobin, | 1439 days ago

Hello, Viewfinder addicts. Welcome back to our series in which we present interesting projects people in the instant film community are working on that incorporate Impossible film. This week, we’re happy to bring you Dylan Boyd’s “Abandoned Oklahoma”…

“Abandoned Oklahoma” is a project I started earlier this year to showcase the beauty in Oklahoma’s long forgotten past. While Oklahoma has progressed, many of its treasures have still remained and yet been forgotten by most. This project has given me the opportunity to explore the back roads of Oklahoma searching for these lost towns and structures.

These places, such as old schools and churches, have been abandoned for years and yet still have all their features such as desks, chairs, pews and wall hangings. They seem almost untouched. These places can give you an eerie feeling as well as a pleasant one. Its almost like stepping back in time when you step inside.

Impossible film only amplifies the wonders of each place I explore. Impossible film has such a unique and beautiful quality to it. I love the colors and contrast you can achieve when shooting with it in different light and temperatures; it’s absolutely magical.

My goal with this project is to preserve a part of Oklahoma’s past and to show everyone pieces of its beautiful history.

To see more of Dylan’s “Abandoned Oklahoma” images, please click HERE. You can also follow Dylan on Twitter at @dylanboydfresh

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No. 472

PHOTOVILLE FESTIVAL BROOKLYN

Frank Love, | 1438 days ago

FRIDAY June 22 - SUNDAY JUNE 24 & THURSDAY JUNE 28 - SUNDAY JULY 1
PHOTOVILLE FESTIVAL
Pier 3 Uplands at Brooklyn Bridge Park
360 Furman Street
11201 Brooklyn NY

As part of New York’s buzzing Summer Calendar, a new photography festival has emerged with an incredible line up of photo activities and vendors all in an industrial setting in Dumbo, Brooklyn. Running over two weekends in June, The Impossible Project Space NYC will host not only a pop up store, but FREE talks and workshops to celebrate New York’s world famous photographic community and culture.

The Photoville Festival will feature a feisty mix of exhibitions, lectures, hands-on workshops, nighttime projections, a photo dog run, a camera greenhouse, and a summer beer-garden with food trucks that will create a photography destination like no other.

Occupying more than 60,000 sq. feet in the heart of Brooklyn Bridge Park, Photoville will be located on the uplands of Pier 3, along the Brooklyn Waterfront between DUMBO and Atlantic Avenue.

—————————————————————————————————————————

IMPOSSIBLE FREE WORKSHOPS & TALKS TIMETABLE

—————————————————————————————————————————

“AN INTRODUCTION TO IMPOSSIBLE FILM & THE 600 CAMERA”
This workshop is designed to explore the full potential and versatility of any Polaroid 600 series camera. Register here: http://photoville-impossible-630.eventbrite.com/
SATURDAY, JUNE 30 @ 11:15am-12:15pm

—————————————————————————————————————————

“EMBRACING THE IMPOSSIBLE”
This is the story of how a handful of passionate analog instant film enthusiasts saved the last remaining Polaroid plant and all the adversities they had to overcome.
SATURDAY, JUNE 30 @6:30pm-7:30pm

—————————————————————————————————————————

“AN INTRODUCTION TO IMPOSSIBLE FILM & THE POLAROID SX-70 CAMERA”
Delve into the magical world of the iconic Polaroid SX-70 camera with the new Impossible Project film. Register here: http://photoville-impossible-71.eventbrite.com/
SUNDAY, JULY 1 @ 12:30pm-1:30pm

—————————————————————————————————————————

“EMBRACING THE IMPOSSIBLE”
This is the story of how a handful of passionate analog instant film enthusiasts saved the last remaining Polaroid plant and all the adversities they had to overcome.
SUNDAY, JULY 1 @ 4:30-5:30

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No. 473

8 Exposures...with Toby Hancock

Patrick Tobin, | 1437 days ago

Photo by Rommel Pecson

Hello, Impossibles! We’re back with another entry in our instant film Q&A series, 8 Exposures. This week, we are happy to bring you LA-based Brit wonder Toby Hancock

1. What kind of Polaroid camera(s) do you use?:

I built an extensive collection of Polaroid cameras in the 1990s, which was a time when they could be bought dirt cheap at flea markets and on eBay. So, I regularly use two somewhat beaten up SLR 680s and two or three SX-70 Sonars. I usually have at least two on hand loaded with different types of film. I have turned my 680s into Frankenroids by swapping the film doors for SX-70 ones, which has resulted in fewer divots (not that there’s anything wrong with divots!). Impossible Project’s Dr “Frankenroid” Love has a very informative blog post about this simple transformation HERE.

2. Why do you like instant photography?:

As many before me have said, it’s magic in the palm of your hand. It’s unpredictable and often creates unexpected, but beautiful results. Undoubtedly, the more you shoot, the more predictable it becomes, but there’s always the potential for one of those perfect mistakes to be lurking around the next corner.

3 simple rules to shoot Impossible film by:

1. Always expect the unexpected and embrace the fact that it might give you some of your best images
2. There’s no such thing as a wasted Polaroid
3. Never throw any photograph away
4. There’s probably a fourth rule, but I can’t think of it right now

3. What is your earliest memory of instant film?

Unlike many people, there wasn’t a Polaroid in my household while I was growing up, so I don’t have any of those cute or embarrassing stories to share with you.

My lawyer has advised me not to answer this question and to give you my second earliest memory, instead. The earliest one is boring and I don’t really remember it very well, except to say that it definitely didn’t involve a Straight Shooter, and activities that may or may not be illegal in some countries. In any case, all the photos were overexposed. Maybe overexposed is the wrong word to use here?

My second earliest memory was in the early 1980s at the beginning of my career in TV and film production, where Polaroid film was ubiquitous. It was an industrial tool used by casting directors, the wardrobe and art departments, script supervisors, cinematographers, etc., etc. It was a major part of any production. Of course, it was also used to take fun pictures of co-workers and everyone had a few Polaroids stuck on the office wall. I never dreamed it would ever be anything more than that to me.

But that all changed, when I met…

…to be continued in Question 7 (I love a good cliffhanger)

4. What’s your favorite Impossible film type?:

Some weeks ago, when I first started to procrastinate about answering these questions, I would’ve said PX 600 UV+. However, since then I’ve had the chance to use the newly released Cool films and my new favorite is PX 680 Cool, closely followed by the latest PX 100. As someone who’s been a “color guy” for decades, all the Impossible black and white films have been a revelation. In the end, I’ve had great success and enjoyment shooting all the different editions and flavors, so to try to pick a favorite is similar to asking a parent to pick their favorite child. My parents would have picked me!

5. What are your favorite subjects to photograph?:

I shoot many subjects. I’ve always loved night photography & landscapes, but I also like portraiture, aerial photography, abandoned places and things, food, nature. If I can point a camera at it, I’ll take a picture, provided the security guards don’t get to me first.

6. Tell us about a project you’re working on:

Nothing specific at the moment. One of these days I hope to publish a book or two of my hundreds of Time Zero manipulations and Impossible images. Unfortunately, scanning and curating them will probably take the rest of my life.

7. Who are your favorite photographers, instant or otherwise?:

Previously on 8 Exposures with Toby Hancock – But that all changed, when I met…

Michael Dare, who introduced me to the miracle of Polaroid Time Zero manipulation. Watching him do his brilliant work, completely changed my concept of instant photography… In an instant (pun intended), it went from a bit of fun and invaluable work tool to a pretty serious art form, although still fun.

Other instant photographers? Andy Warhol, David Hockney, Ansel Adams (instant and other), Helmut Newton (instant and other). And then there’s the incredible Flickr community – way too many people to mention, so I’ll offer up three guys and three girls. Ladies first, the outstanding Rhiannon Adam, the wonderful Jessica Reinhardt and the extraordinary Kim Oberski. And these dudes: The Gentleman Amateur, Brandon Long and Rommel Pecson, who captured my double chin so perfectly in the portrait that accompanies this piece. These six, along with dozens and dozens more favorites, are an inspiration to me everyday. It goes without saying that the folks at Impossible are an extremely talented group of shooters.

Non-instant photographers – Brassaï and his brilliant night and street photography, the amazing Sally Mann, the really rather good Man Ray, not bad for a girl Annie Leibovitz. And again, too many others to mention.

8. If you could take any photo of anyone or anything what would it be?:

I’m a big fan of clichéd, iconic, tourist attractions. I always hope to find a different angle or take on something that’s been photographed literally millions of times before. So, with that in mind, I’ll say the Taj Mahal. Honestly though, while that’s something I’d like to see in person, I’d be just as happy jumping in my car with a bag of cameras and driving out to the desert in search of an abandoned gas station or rundown small town.

About Toby

British-born Toby Hancock has been living in Los Angeles for over 30 years. He is a semi-retired veteran of the TV and Film business, but would consider coming out of retirement if Mr. Spielberg called. When he grows up he’d like to be a photographer.

You can follow Toby on Twitter at @tobysx70

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No. 474

The Camera Museum: Polaroid SX-70 Sonar Blue Button Special Edition

Patrick Tobin, | 1436 days ago

As many consumers had difficulty focusing with their original SX-70s, Polaroid released an autofocus model of their folding SX-70 in 1978. The SX-70 Time Zero Auto-Focus utilized a new and very advanced sonar technology. When the shutter button is pressed halfway, a series of ultrasonic chirps is emitted from an electrostatic transducer located under a plate over the lens. These chirps travel to the subject and bounce back to the camera’s receiver, alerting the camera to the subject’s distance, and the lens is turned on a motor to focus accordingly.

The Polaroid SX-70 Time Zero Auto-Focus features a 4-element 116mm glass lens, manual or autofocus capabilities, with a minimum focal length of 10.4 inches, electronic shutter, programmed automatic exposure and a socket for flashbars or electronic flashes. Another nice feature is a socket for an electrically-actuated remote shutter release.

This particular model sports a delightful blue button, which Polaroid used to designate Special Editions.

The SX-70 Time Zero Auto-Focus works with all of Impossible’s SX-70 films, which can be purchased HERE

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No. 475

Impossible's Sunday Brunch - Issue 8

Patrick Tobin, | 1435 days ago

Photo by Erynn Patrick

Welcome back to Sunday Brunch, our new series in which we highlight 5 delicious photographic treats that caught our eye over the course of the week. This week, we paid a visit to the Impossible Sample Gallery, where users the world over can submit their own images captured on Impossible film

Photos in this edition come from Erynn Patrick, Joanna Gałuszka, Francesca Todde, Penny Felts and Rick DeMint

…using the following film types: PX 70 Cool, PX 680 Cool, PX 600 Black Frame and PZ 600 Black Frame

Be sure to submit your own Impossible images to our Sample Gallery. Your photo may show up in a future post!

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No. 476

Labour & Love

Josie Keefe, | 1434 days ago

July 7th
1-4pm
Impossible Project NYC Space

A diagnostic clinic with the Impossible Camera Wizards

Working with vintage Polaroid cameras can sometimes feel like a labour of love. If you’ve been having trouble with your camera, come to our camera diagnostic clinic, offered for the first time ever in the Impossible Project NYC Space. We will have two of the most knowledgable Polaroid camera repair experts in the country on hand to diagnose and troubleshoot your vintage polaroid camera.

Impossible’s reknowned Dr. Love will be in the house with all his technical tips & tricks. And joining him will be Phototech’s Polaroid magical man, José Labour, who is arguably, the only man left in the country still able to fully repair a Polaroid SX-70 camera.

Individual appointments will be given on a first come first serve basis, and will be strictly limited to a 10 minute maximum. The experts will assess your camera and help guide you through some easy fixes, but will not be doing any extensive camera repairs. If your camera needs repair, you will be able to submit it to Phototech at this event.

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No. 477

Impossible at the Rencontres de la Photographie Arles

Frank Love | 1433 days ago

JUL 2 - 7, 2012
ENSP 16 rue des arènes
ENSP
16 rue des arènes
13200 Arles
France

A wall of Instant Pictures to celebrate the 30th anniversary of the National School of Photography.

During the opening week of the festival in Arles, Impossible celebrates 30 years of the distinguished École Nationale Supérieure de la Photographie: The school will install a “Trombinoscope” – a growing yearbook wall of instant pictures for the past graduates of the school. During their celebratory reunion, masters of photography will portrait their classmates one another playfully and informally.

If you happen to be a graduate of the ENSP, come and join us at the Trombinoscope des 30 ans! Impossible will equip you with instant film and, if you don’t want to bring your own, with a Polaroid camera. Shoot and Stick your portrait on the wall dedicated to stick portraits on to it: the Trombinoscope! Meet us in the schoolyard from July 2nd to 7th.

And for all you photographers that want to get their polaroid cameras running again, the Impossible Project Space Paris will set up a base camp in the schoolyard for the opening week! You can get integral films for SX-70, 600 type, Image/Spectra cameras and refreshing beverages to celebrate the 30 years anniversary of the school!

Click for more

27
No. 478

Viewfinder: Karen Mirzoyan

Patrick Tobin, | 1432 days ago

Welcome back to Viewfinder, our blog series that chronicles interesting projects people are working on that incorporate Impossible film. This week, we bring you Karen Mirzoyan

Here is just some pictures of one chapter of new big project about my relationship with my girlfriend. It will consist of 7 parts/chapters. This one is part 5: “Friends”, Close friends and acquaintances who helped me during hard times after I broke up with my girlfriend in LA.

I like to work with the Polaroid SX-70 and Impossible film. I really enjoyed the first editions of Impossible film with many defects. I bought many packs, and for me it was good, because i couldn’t control the results 100%, or know what kind of picture I would have in the end.

With pro cameras you control and know what you’ll have. But sometimes it becomes boring. The SX-70 and Impossible films always surprise me; sometimes something great, sometimes not what you expect.

And this is beautiful.

Shots where the picture was not perfect and half of the image was lost, i started to write text there to fill the empty space. Then I started to draw. And I chose cheap markers for it. I really want to create something very simple and at the same time deep. Deep because subject is very important for me.

My friends really helped me in hard times and at the same time everyone had their problems and hard times too. These damaged frames from the first films that Impossible produced fit with my mood at that time. Now Impossible films are perfect, and my mood is the same :)

To see more of Karen’s work, please visit his website at www.karenmirzoyan.com

No. 479

Instant People - Polaroid Self-Portraits Project

Frank Love | 1432 days ago

JUL 11 - 23, 2012
Kasseler KunstVereinsHeim
Werner-Hilpert-Strasse 23
34117 Kassel
Germany

A PROJECT BY FRANTICHAM’S POLAROID MADNESS, IRELAND

Make your self-portrait with any polaroid camera.
Sign on the picture side and add date and place.
On the back write name, address and website or blog
and which camera and film has been used
Send to click for details

In July the pictures will be exhibited in Kassel, Germany during the DOCUMENTA 2012.

Further exhibitions are planned for: – Luxembourg, Walfer Bicherdeeg, 17-18 November – Galeria AT, Poznan, Poland, 10-21 December 2012 – Polazone, Seoul, Korea, 2013

Click to visit Instant People

28
No. 480

CHLOE AFTEL IN BLUR MAGAZINE'S INSTANTION

Frank Love | 1431 days ago

One of our favourite photographers, Chloe Aftel, is featured in the current edition of Blur magazine’s “Instantion” category.

Selected images taken by Chloe as well as a bunch of interesting question make this feature an insightful and inspiring one.

About her experience with Impossible film she says: “I love it because you have to use it with the expectation that it will evolve over time or in certain lights; you can get images that far surpass your expectations if you learn how to use the film and then to push it past its intended uses.”

Download BLUR 26 here

No. 481

ARTIST IN RESIDENCE: RYAN NABULSI

Josie Keefe, | 1431 days ago

For this installment of Artist in Residence we check in with Ryan Nabulsi who currently has a solo exhibition, Manipulating the Science of Chance on view in the NYC Impossible Project Space until July 31st.

This work is about process, about chemistry, about how those things create images we know as photographs, and about exploring the possibilities of a media. Whenever I think about this work, I think about the path that has led me to the process I am using now and how that process is never stable; it alters with a new tool I find, with a new idea, or with a combination of multiple experiments. I have destroyed so many packs of film in the pursuit of something that I am still unsure of. So, all I can think to do when I talk about this work is tell the story of how these images came about.

As The Impossible Project began to roll out their test material, I jumped on board and began shooting and testing with the material. For me, I was hoping for an exact copy of the experience with Polaroid film, and at first, was a little disappointed with the images produced with this new version of instant photography. However, after playing with the film and getting used to its quirks, I began to appreciate the experience as a technical pioneer. The creators were asking its consumers to be literal pioneers with their film, to figure out its deficiencies and help the company recreate something that should have been impossible to do. Additionally, my faulty cameras would interact with the new film oddly. So, I was still getting those “dead” looking images. As one camera completely failed on me, I started noticing how the entire instant film process worked. Negative sheet exposed to the light and a
pod of “goo” spread across the sheet. A simple enough process that I thought I could control, byremoving the camera all together.

That first pack I popped open without any intention of shooting a photograph was a terrifying and liberating experience. By opening the pack to the light, I had destroyed any representational potential that the image could possibly have; no actual photograph could exist on the material. All that would be visible after the process was the chemistry and the marks I left within that material. I smashed the chemistry at first with basic tools, like my fingers or a pen. Later, my tools would get more sophisticated and the process more refined, able to predict or determine certain patterns or colors with a decent amount of accuracy. I discovered that all the quirks of shooting the film applied to my process, so heat and cold and exposure to light during the developing process were all key aspects to predicting and determining the final outcome of the image.

The process was (and still is) based somewhat on chance. As The Impossible Project refined their film, my color palettes changed from only cream and orange with the first versions of Silver Shade film to the wild blues, greens, oranges and reds that appear with the newer Color Shade films. Each new film was like receiving new tubes of paint and canvases. I believe the images satisfy a very deep desire for me when I think of photography. The “photographs” are intersections of multiple technologies. The analog meets the digital, and the digital helps to explore the beauty of the analog by granting access to views that were never possible before (or at least not as easy to obtain). In this way, I hope to allow people to peer into a world of possibility for photography, one where the process of the image creation can be just as important as the image contained within the frame.

No. 482

Impossible at Tate Lab

Frank Love | 1431 days ago

JUL 7, 2012
11am - 4pm
Tate Britain
Millbank
London SW1P 4RG
United Kingdom

Next weekend Tate Britain will be hosting the Youth Market TATE LAB with Impossible Project. The Tate Collective’s creative lab encourages young people to experiment, create and innovate through art and ideas. 15 – 25 year olds are invited to come along to the gallery to work collaboratively with photographer Cyrus Mahboubian using Impossible Project film in Polaroid cameras, using the Tate’s collection as inspiration.

The event is free for 15 – 25 year olds to attend. Check tate.org.uk/collectives for booking details or call +44 (0) 20 7887 8888

Mahboubian is a London based artist of Iranian origin, working mainly in Polaroid and 35mm photography. He is inspired by his own daily journeys, chance encounters and the natural world. Motivated by how quickly time passes, he treats photography as a notebook and a way to preserve memories of significant moments in his life.

29
No. 483

8 Exposures...with Kelly Knaga

Patrick Tobin, | 1430 days ago

Hello, friends, and welcome back to 8 Exposures, our popular instant film Q&A series. This week, we’re happy to bring you a Midwest girl, Kelly Knaga

1) What kind of Polaroid camera(s) do you use?

I’ve collected a number of cameras mostly through garage sales, Goodwill stores and eBay, but I tend to use the same 4 over and over: my SX-70, my refurbished 340 Land Camera, a Spectra I got from a retired cop and my very first 600 that my grandmother gave me one summer when I was about 10.

2) Why do you like instant photography?

I love the moment just before, the one where I hold my breath, waiting for the film to develop. I love the imperfections and inconsistencies of instant film, which seems relevant to the constant fluctuations and vulnerabilities that occur in life. Experimental films, expired films, a scratched camera lens or vintage, barely working, taped together cameras all invite moments of exploration of space, color, time or the material composition of the film itself.

3) What is your earliest memory of instant film?

Someone taking a picture of my grandfather holding me on his lap while he is sitting on his tractor. I still have the photo.

4) What’s your favorite Impossible film type?

I love experimenting with them all. I think my favorite right now are the Spectra Cool films. My sincerest thanks to Impossible for helping keep instant film alive.

5) What are your favorite subjects to photograph?

I have always been drawn to natural landscapes and the small, incredible, every day moments we often dismiss or take for granted.

6) Tell us about a project you’re working on.

I’m currently working on a long-term project about the Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore. I’m also documenting the urban farm I’m building with my friend. But my life-long goal is to hike and photograph all of the U.S. National Parks.

7) Who are your favorite photographers, instant or otherwise?

I tend to gravitate toward landscape photographers. But I also have a great interest in portrait and food photographers as well.

8) If you could take a photo of anyone or anything what would it be?

Iceland. Definitely Iceland. It just looks like a magical place, doesn’t it?

About Kelly

Kelly is a designer, teacher, farmer, photographer and is always up for a great adventure.

To see more of Kelly’s work, please visit her Flickr photostream. You can also follow her on Twitter at @amidwestgirl.

30
No. 484

The Camera Museum: Polaroid's Cool Cam

Patrick Tobin, | 1429 days ago

In 1988, Polaroid released its Cool Cam, which was essentially the Sun 600 with flashy colors and branded with the “Cool Cam” moniker. It came in several color combinations, including Pink & Grey and the pictured Red & Black. The Cool Cam also came with a matching carrying case and a sheet of word bubble stickers that could be adhered to your photos to add some COOLNESS!

The Cool Cam features a single-element 116mm plastic lens, fixed focus, with minimum focal length of 4 feet, electronic shutter, programmed auto-exposure system and a built-in electronic flash.

The Cool Cam works with all of Impossible’s 600 films. For a complete list of compatible films, click HERE

You can also click HERE for a Polaroid 600 camera manual

No. 482

Impossible at Tate Lab

Frank Love | 1431 days ago

JUL 7, 2012
11am - 4pm
Tate Britain
Millbank
London SW1P 4RG
United Kingdom

Next weekend Tate Britain will be hosting the Youth Market TATE LAB with Impossible Project. The Tate Collective’s creative lab encourages young people to experiment, create and innovate through art and ideas. 15 – 25 year olds are invited to come along to the gallery to work collaboratively with photographer Cyrus Mahboubian using Impossible Project film in Polaroid cameras, using the Tate’s collection as inspiration.

The event is free for 15 – 25 year olds to attend. Check tate.org.uk/collectives for booking details or call +44 (0) 20 7887 8888

Mahboubian is a London based artist of Iranian origin, working mainly in Polaroid and 35mm photography. He is inspired by his own daily journeys, chance encounters and the natural world. Motivated by how quickly time passes, he treats photography as a notebook and a way to preserve memories of significant moments in his life.

No. 479

Instant People - Polaroid Self-Portraits Project

Frank Love | 1432 days ago

JUL 11 - 23, 2012
Kasseler KunstVereinsHeim
Werner-Hilpert-Strasse 23
34117 Kassel
Germany

A PROJECT BY FRANTICHAM’S POLAROID MADNESS, IRELAND

Make your self-portrait with any polaroid camera.
Sign on the picture side and add date and place.
On the back write name, address and website or blog
and which camera and film has been used
Send to click for details

In July the pictures will be exhibited in Kassel, Germany during the DOCUMENTA 2012.

Further exhibitions are planned for: – Luxembourg, Walfer Bicherdeeg, 17-18 November – Galeria AT, Poznan, Poland, 10-21 December 2012 – Polazone, Seoul, Korea, 2013

Click to visit Instant People

No. 477

Impossible at the Rencontres de la Photographie Arles

Frank Love | 1433 days ago

JUL 2 - 7, 2012
ENSP 16 rue des arènes
ENSP
16 rue des arènes
13200 Arles
France

A wall of Instant Pictures to celebrate the 30th anniversary of the National School of Photography.

During the opening week of the festival in Arles, Impossible celebrates 30 years of the distinguished École Nationale Supérieure de la Photographie: The school will install a “Trombinoscope” – a growing yearbook wall of instant pictures for the past graduates of the school. During their celebratory reunion, masters of photography will portrait their classmates one another playfully and informally.

If you happen to be a graduate of the ENSP, come and join us at the Trombinoscope des 30 ans! Impossible will equip you with instant film and, if you don’t want to bring your own, with a Polaroid camera. Shoot and Stick your portrait on the wall dedicated to stick portraits on to it: the Trombinoscope! Meet us in the schoolyard from July 2nd to 7th.

And for all you photographers that want to get their polaroid cameras running again, the Impossible Project Space Paris will set up a base camp in the schoolyard for the opening week! You can get integral films for SX-70, 600 type, Image/Spectra cameras and refreshing beverages to celebrate the 30 years anniversary of the school!

Click for more

No. 476

Labour & Love

Josie Keefe, | 1434 days ago

July 7th
1-4pm
Impossible Project NYC Space

A diagnostic clinic with the Impossible Camera Wizards

Working with vintage Polaroid cameras can sometimes feel like a labour of love. If you’ve been having trouble with your camera, come to our camera diagnostic clinic, offered for the first time ever in the Impossible Project NYC Space. We will have two of the most knowledgable Polaroid camera repair experts in the country on hand to diagnose and troubleshoot your vintage polaroid camera.

Impossible’s reknowned Dr. Love will be in the house with all his technical tips & tricks. And joining him will be Phototech’s Polaroid magical man, José Labour, who is arguably, the only man left in the country still able to fully repair a Polaroid SX-70 camera.

Individual appointments will be given on a first come first serve basis, and will be strictly limited to a 10 minute maximum. The experts will assess your camera and help guide you through some easy fixes, but will not be doing any extensive camera repairs. If your camera needs repair, you will be able to submit it to Phototech at this event.

No. 472

PHOTOVILLE FESTIVAL BROOKLYN

Frank Love, | 1438 days ago

FRIDAY June 22 - SUNDAY JUNE 24 & THURSDAY JUNE 28 - SUNDAY JULY 1
PHOTOVILLE FESTIVAL
Pier 3 Uplands at Brooklyn Bridge Park
360 Furman Street
11201 Brooklyn NY

As part of New York’s buzzing Summer Calendar, a new photography festival has emerged with an incredible line up of photo activities and vendors all in an industrial setting in Dumbo, Brooklyn. Running over two weekends in June, The Impossible Project Space NYC will host not only a pop up store, but FREE talks and workshops to celebrate New York’s world famous photographic community and culture.

The Photoville Festival will feature a feisty mix of exhibitions, lectures, hands-on workshops, nighttime projections, a photo dog run, a camera greenhouse, and a summer beer-garden with food trucks that will create a photography destination like no other.

Occupying more than 60,000 sq. feet in the heart of Brooklyn Bridge Park, Photoville will be located on the uplands of Pier 3, along the Brooklyn Waterfront between DUMBO and Atlantic Avenue.

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IMPOSSIBLE FREE WORKSHOPS & TALKS TIMETABLE

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“AN INTRODUCTION TO IMPOSSIBLE FILM & THE 600 CAMERA”
This workshop is designed to explore the full potential and versatility of any Polaroid 600 series camera. Register here: http://photoville-impossible-630.eventbrite.com/
SATURDAY, JUNE 30 @ 11:15am-12:15pm

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“EMBRACING THE IMPOSSIBLE”
This is the story of how a handful of passionate analog instant film enthusiasts saved the last remaining Polaroid plant and all the adversities they had to overcome.
SATURDAY, JUNE 30 @6:30pm-7:30pm

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“AN INTRODUCTION TO IMPOSSIBLE FILM & THE POLAROID SX-70 CAMERA”
Delve into the magical world of the iconic Polaroid SX-70 camera with the new Impossible Project film. Register here: http://photoville-impossible-71.eventbrite.com/
SUNDAY, JULY 1 @ 12:30pm-1:30pm

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“EMBRACING THE IMPOSSIBLE”
This is the story of how a handful of passionate analog instant film enthusiasts saved the last remaining Polaroid plant and all the adversities they had to overcome.
SUNDAY, JULY 1 @ 4:30-5:30