June 2011

9
No. 98

The Revival of Instant Film

Frank Love | 1878 days ago

A film team of Digifoto Pro recently visited the Impossible Factory in Enschede (NL) to create a fantastic film about “The Revival of Instant Film”

Follow director Maurits Reijnoudt into the Impossible Universe – Watch Here!

14
No. 99

Travelling with Impossible Films

Frank Love | 1873 days ago

Summer is near, and so are – if you’re lucky – holidays and travels. Don’t forget to pack your Polaroid cameras as well as a few Impossible films!

Watch or re-watch this video with Doctor Franck to learn how to properly store your film before departure and how to safely travel with film without risking xray damage to your film.

15
No. 100

The 365 Project

Frank Love, | 1872 days ago

Nate is currently working on THE 365 PROJECT – a photo a day project for 2011, using nothing but new films created for Polaroid camera’s by Impossible.

He is now quickly approaching 6 months of shooting every day with Impossible’s film – follow his Impossible Life HERE

16
No. 101

Special Edition "Impossible Rainbow" prints available

Josie Keefe, | 1871 days ago

Just arrived in our New York store – a special edition batch of 10 beautiful “Impossible Rainbow” prints available for sale! A treat for any Polaroid devotee, these exclusive prints fit perfectly in a 50cm x 70cm frame and are for sale for just $75. The prints were specially made for the Impossible Project by the talented Mark Griffiths, an artist and lifelong Polaroid enthusiast.

This exclusive deal is available at our NYC Space. Stop by or call our New York Space (212.219.3254) to grab one before they are gone.

Mark will be giving away one of these prints to a lucky winner. Visit his blog to enter the giveaway. Mark will randomly chose a winner from the comments on the site. Enter before June 24th for a chance to win one of these lovely prints!

More of Mark’s art is available for sale on his etsy store.

20
No. 102

Impossible Pop Up Store Vienna

Sarah Jungreithmayr, | 1868 days ago

On the occasion of POLAROID [IM]POSSIBLE we packed our moving boxes and transferred our Impossible Project Space Vienna to a Pop Up Shop location for the duration of the exhibition. Right next to WestLicht, we’re now turning the venue into the most analog instant hotspot of Vienna.

IMPOSSIBLE POP UP SHOP
JUNE, 17th – AUGUST 21st
Westbahnstraße 38
1070 Vienna, Austria

Mon, Tue, Wed, Fri: 12:00 – 19:00
Thu: 14:00 – 21:00
Sat: 11:00 – 19:00

vienna@the-impossible-project.com
The Impossible Project Space in Breite Gasse will be closed during this time.

24
No. 103

HOW TO USE PX 70 COLOR SHADE

Frank Love, | 1864 days ago

Truth be told, the speed (light sensitivity) of this film is not totally where we expected it to be for the average SX 70 camera, and especially in bright summer light, the tendency for overexposed images is high. So please make sure to adjust the lighten/darken wheel of your SX 70 camera to the darkest setting. With a little experimentation, you will find the right darken setting for your camera.

This slightly high film speed will yield simply amazing color and tones in your correctly exposed SX 70 pictures, but it also opens up the amazing possibility to use this magic material in your 600 camera without the need of any additional filters! Simply insert the film in your Polaroid 600 camera, if necessary, add a little lighten adjustment and surround yourself with colors!

26
No. 104

From Polaroid To Impossible

Patrick Tobin, | 1861 days ago

We are pleased to announce the release of the new book chronicling the history and evolution of the instant photograph, “From Polaroid To Impossible.”

Published in conjunction with the POLAROID (IM)POSSIBLE exhibition, this gorgeous 200-page book, printed by acclaimed German publisher Hatje Cantz, brings together instant masterpieces from legends such as Ansel Adams and Andy Warhol to current artists like David Levinthal, EJ Camp and Mary Ellen Mark. The book also contains introductory essays by Barbara Hitchcock, Achim Heine and Florian Kaps.

“From Polaroid To Impossible” is available in our online shop, and we currently have nine copies for sale at $51.90 USD at the NYC Impossible Project Space.

30
No. 105

Perfect your PX 680 Color Shade FF Images!

Frank Love | 1857 days ago

The more we shoot PX 680 Color Shade FF film the more we love it and our images are getting better and better. We’ve assembled some of our best tips and tricks and hope you find them useful!

• Warming your print for one to two minutes during development helps to bring out better tones and contrast. You can stick the print under your arm or on a warm surface. Be careful not to overheat your images or they’ll end up yellowed.

• To avoid green excess chemicals leaking into image from pods, cut pods on back to air dry. Place the images in a plastic bag, seal tightly and store upright in fridge.

• If you’re shooting PX680ff in a SX 70 using a ND filter and getting less than colorful images try removing the filter and turning your L/D wheel all the way to darken. This works well indoors and on more overcast days. Please keep in mind that all SX 70s are different and this may not work for everyone.

• If you’re shooting on hot days and your camera gets warm your photos will tend to have an orange/pink hue, on cooler days or in an air conditioned space the colors will be much more true to life.

and of course…

ALWAYS SHIELD YOUR IMAGES FROM LIGHT FOR THE FIRST MINUTE!

Frank Love has carefully analyzed the best way to work with high-contrast scenes and has this to say:

“When shooting high-contrast scenes, you can change the focus of your shot using exposure. You can set your camera to under or over expose the shot to better define what your focus is. Whether you want to see the person sitting in the shadows, or keep your background reigned in, here you can see how adjusting your L/D wheel changes the shot.”

No. 106

Trick out your PX 680 Color Shade FF

Frank Love | 1857 days ago

Patrick Tobin created a nifty technique called a “controlled flash/burn.” He explains how to use it below:

With PX 680, because it takes longer to develop, it is possible to perform controlled flashes/burns on your image during the first few minutes of development. If you would like to “burn” text or shapes onto your photos, you can do the following.

1. Cut the words/shapes out of a piece of construction paper or darkslide, stencil-style, with siccors or an exact knife.

2. Have it at-the-ready for when making an exposure. When the print ejects from the camera, keep it shielded with the darkslide.

3. Quickly, take the print, covered by the darkslide, to a bright light source, preferably a window that gets a lot of sunlight.

4. Lay your stencil over the print and darkslide, lining up exactly where you’d like your burn to show up on your image, and slide the darkslide out from between the stencil and the print, allowing sunlight to leak onto your image in the shape you have cut.
The faster you do all of the above, the better. The print is uber light sensitive for the first minute or so especially. Also, it is a good idea to leave some dark space on your print where you’d like to leave your burn, so that the words/shapes stand out. As you can tell, some planning goes into this process, but it is fun to do.

No. 1201

Tutorial Thursday: Frog Tongue For Box-Type Cameras

Amy Heaton, | 625 days ago

Welcome back to Tutorial Thursday! To help you make the most of our Impossible Film we bring you bi-monthly creative technique tutorials with ideas that can be easily reproduced at home, whether it’s camera-based, relating to film manipulation or even painting directly onto your instant photos.

For this edition of Tutorial Thursday, we show you how to add a frog tongue to any box-type Polaroid camera. The Impossible Frog Tongue shields your instant photographs from light as they’re ejected from the camera. It is reusable, but just to note that we do not recommend installing into folding type Polaroid™ One 600 models! It’s quick and easy to add the frog tongue to your existing camera and greatly improves the exposure and development of your photographs.

What you will need:

1 Polaroid Box-Type Camera (We’re using a Polaroid 600-type camera here)
1 Impossible Frog Tongue

Method:

Step 1: Take a tool similar to the one shown and lever it just beneath the slot to the front of the camera—where your photos are usually ejected from.

Step 2: Gently remove the slim cover, which should easily clip off with careful use of your chosen tool to reveal space for the Frog Tongue inside.

Step 3: Unpackage the Frog Tongue, and match the pre-sized holes running along the top with the prongs on the slim cover. The frog tongue should roll downwards in the direction shown. If installed incorrectly, it could get stuck inside the camera—potentially disrupting the film ejection process and ruining your photo, so take extra care!

Step 4: Once the Frog Tongue is fitted properly, carefully slot the slim cover back onto your 600 camera unit, we prefer to clip it back on first on the left side, and then the right.

Step 5: Firmly push the slim cover back into place until you hear it click, if the cover is not fitting correctly this may be because the Frog Tongue is not neatly matched with the prongs on the inside of the cover. You can always go back to step 3 and readjust.

Step 6: Push both sides of the cover down to make sure that it has been properly reintegrated onto your Polaroid camera unit.

Step 7: Why not give your Frog Tongue a try and let us know what kinds of results you get?

We are looking forward to see your before and after shots on the Impossible gallery!

Which technique would you like to see next on Tutorial Thursday? Share your ideas with us on Facebook, Twitter or comment here!

No. 1187

Black Frame Edition for SX-70, 600 and Image/Spectra

Amy Heaton, | 640 days ago

Just in time for your bewitching Halloween party portraits this weekend, Impossible has released its long-promised Color 600, SX-70 and Spectra/Image films with Black Frames!

The slick matt finish of the black frame not only instills an undeniably contemporary edge, but also adds depth and presence to the tonal range within the color film emulsion itself—enhancing the tones and contrast of our color film chemistry in unexpected ways.

This is the first time that we have delivered a new edition frame color simultaneously across all three classic Polaroid film formats, however Color 600, SX-70 and Image/Spectra Black Frame are available only in very limited quantities so don’t miss out!

The films join our line-up of frame designs and are suitable for use with any Polaroid SX-70, 600,or Image/Spectra camera as well as the Impossible Instant Lab.

These all-new packs are available to buy now via the Impossible online shop and selected stockists worldwide.

No. 1035

Impossible's Sunday Brunch - Generation 2.0 Color 600

Lucile Le Doze, | 839 days ago

Purple Tiger - Joeppolaroidphotography

Welcome back to Sunday Brunch. Each Sunday, we share with you some photos taken with Impossible film that have caught our eye over the course of the week. Please enjoy these wonderful instant captures!

This week, we would like to focus on the Generation 2.0 Color 600 Film, released a few weeks ago as the first test version of our future range of Color 600 Films. Not since the introduction of Color Protection, nearly two years ago, have our films reached such an important developmental milestone. With this new formula, the image emerges in just two minutes. It is sharper and more stable and the overall processing time is reduced by more than 20 percent.

Photos in this issue come to us from Joeppolaroidphotography, Andrew Bartram, GTD, Jackzilla Photo and Bozowizard.

Want more? Have a look at the Impossible Gallery to see the results! Also share with us your Generation 2.0 Color 600 photos! We look forward to seeing your results!

Stay tuned on our Twitter and Facebook for more photos and info on our upcoming range of films!

No. 932

Impossible Sunday Brunch - Colors!

Lucile Le Doze, | 966 days ago

Gaia, by ale2000 using Impossible Color 600 Color Frames

The Impossible family of film is full of colors! On this Sunday Brunch, we would like to feature the beauty of Impossible film with Gold, Silver and Color Frames! Here are five Impossible photos that have caught our eye over the course of the week on the Impossible Gallery. Please enjoy these colorful instant captures…

Photos in this issue come to us from aponue, ale2000, S. Cooper, FcoJavMunoz. Photos were taken using brand new Impossible Special Edition film: Color 600 Color Frames, Gold Frame and Silver Frame.

See the life in Impossible colors, and be sure to submit to the Impossible Gallery! Your Impossible moment may end up in a future edition of Sunday Brunch!

No. 912

Kate Bellm and Sally Dige Jorgensen get colourfully creative!

Lucile Le Doze, | 983 days ago

Kate Bellm - Cinema

Impossible is proud to introduce another first – the Special Edition Color 600 Color Frame.

With each colour of the eight frames being carefully selected to match the distinctive tonality of Impossible color film, this Special Edition is the brightest and most exciting addition to our “family” of analog instant films.

Color Frame Creation
Impossible have always worked closely with talented photographers and creative artists. Today, we are pleased to introduce two of them : Kate Bellm and Sally Dige Jørgensen.

London born, Berlin based Impossible photographer Kate Bellm one of the first to receive the new Impossible Special Edition Color 600 Color Frame and used the Impossible Instant Lab to create a series of shots in her own distinctive style.

Sally Dige Jørgensen, the super cool Canadian electro artist and designer, allowed us to use her forthcoming 7’’ album cover to create 8 Warhol inspired shots on this very special edition

Get inspired by their work, create your own and frame them with a little colour (and then share the results with us!)

No. 898

The Camera Museum: Polaroid Impulse

Patrick Tobin, | 1010 days ago

The Polaroid Impulse camera was introduced in 1988. Its body style was a bit of a change up from the boxy Polaroid cameras of the 1980s. The body is a hard-wearing plastic, and features rubber grips around the rear. Impulse cameras usually came in a dark gray color, but there were a variety of different colors released as well, including yellow, red, purple and blue.

The Impulse sports a single-element plastic lens with a fixed aperture (116mm, f9), fixed focus with a 4 foot minimum focal length, exposure compensation switch below the lens and a tripod-socket.

One big design difference unique to Impulse cameras is the electronic flash. The flash is raised by pressing down on a button on the top of the unit. The flash then pops up, and this also turns the camera on and retracts a lens cover. The lens cover slides into place when flash is pushed back down (which also turns off the camera). This means that the flash fires for every shot and cannot be overridden. Also available is the AutoFocus model, which utilizes Polaroid’s sonar autofocus technology.

The Impulse works with all of Impossible’s 600-series film, which can be purchased HERE

To pick up an Impulse camera of your own, visit our online shop. We have both the standard Impulse Camera and the Impulse AF Camera available!

No. 898

Impossible's Analog Travelog - Adarsha Benjamin's Road Trip

Patrick Tobin, | 1011 days ago

Welcome back to Impossible’s Analog Travelog! In this series, we showcase fantastic Impossible photos taken on voyages the world over. This entry comes from Adarsha Benjamin who took a road trip in April and brought along some Impossible film

The open road. There is a romance to it, a lust for the wind in our hair, as the skylines whiz past and you head straight into a wonderland of road side attractions…. We started in Los Angeles, and headed straight toward the Grand Canyon, a place I have never seen before as an adult. My mom said I was there as a baby, but of course I have no memory. The Grand Canyon is the kind of place that no photograph will ever really do justice. It’s so astoundingly huge and magnificent that only your living breathing eye could make it make sense. I loved it and wanted to spend days climbing in and out of it. We had an afternoon there, in the snow, with the elks and the pinion sap. The next day we drove through Arizona, into New Mexico until our tired eyes couldn’t drive another mile.

Spent a strange night in Albuquerque, then headed straight to Sante Fe in the morning where we checked into The Inn of the Five Graces, a charming, hospitable hotel that truly marked a memory in our minds for years to come. After Sante Fe, there was a brief drive through Taos which mostly will be remembered as the city in which we finally lost our road trip minds…. For the next day or so, we drove mostly in silence as we left New Mexico, and made our way through the never ending mess that is Texas….. There might have been 9 hours without one word said, but many a tumbleweed crossed the road, and few clouds hung in that Texas sky.

We made it to Austin, spent a few days in the debauched SXSW before we had our final retreat in Marfa, Texas where we were greeted by our lovely friends who were there, and their friend who is a Marfa local. He drank two bottles of whiskey the night we got in, and woke us in the morning by blasting Tears of a Clown at top volume, wearing a woman’s tunic and no underwear…. We stayed our final night at the El Cosmico, an RV park turned modern hotel where a beautiful group of dreamers, dear friends of mine from all four corners of the USA came together and watched the sun rise and then we ate pizza in the imperial mansion, our two bedroom RV. Together in more than one piece, we drove 16 hours straight from Marfa to Los Angeles, arriving at 3am to the fresh scent of jasmine in the LA night, with that bewildered, content feeling in our hearts of having just survived all of our own personal road trip blues…..

I love shooting on impossible instant film. It makes mementos of the moments, without interruption. My nature is instinctual and instant and being able to capture so freely as I travel through the world suits who I am so perfectly…

About Adarsha

I am a photographer and visual artist. I live in Los Angeles and I travel often.

Thanks to Adarsha for taking part in Analog Travelog! To see more of her photography, visit her Tumblr. You can also follow her on Twitter at @adarshabenjamin.

If you’ve recently taken a trip on which you shot some IMPOSSIBLE photos, please shoot us an email at usa@theimpossibleproject.com.

No. 873

Impossible's Analog Travelog - Kasper van Steveninck in South Thailand

Patrick Tobin, | 1054 days ago

Welcome back to Impossible’s Analog Travelog! In this series, we showcase fantastic Impossible photos taken on voyages the world over. This entry comes from Kasper van Steveninck who recently traveled to South Thailand with some Impossible film

The act of loving kindness was to be recognised all over Thailand. The selflessness people probably inhereted from Buddhism shaped their hearts and faces in something overwhelmed with friendliness. Everywhere I went people would be kind and greet me. The combination of their benevolence and their well-formed faces made me want to document as many Thai people I could photograph in two weeks time.

Equipped with a Mamiya c220, a Nikkormat FT2, a Polaroid 600 and lots of film I recorded more than a hundred faces during my stay in South Thailand. It was like their loving-kindness was translated into my own mind by the medium of photography. I forgot about carefully looking at landscapes, buying souvenires, and all other tourist stuff. All I wanted is to seek the beauty and kindness in others and document these experiences by the aid of images. I came up with the idea to create an analog photographic series about the people people in Thailand and the importance of human empathy in general.

To add some variety to the overpresence of portraits in creating my new series, the polaroids were the perfect medium. The effect of a polaroid picture just gives that little extra touch to a work full of portraits. When shooting with my polaroid I could focus on ambiance for a change instead of shooting portraits with my other two cameras. The results were a perfect add on to my series!

About Kasper

I am a 24-year old Law Student, though photography and enjoying happiness and freedom is what I do by heart. I live in The Hague, The Netherlands.

Thanks to Kasper for taking part in Analog Travelog! To see more of the photos from his trip please visit http://empuhthee.tumblr.com/. You can also check out his Facebook photo page.

No. 850

8 Exposures...with Margot Gabel

Patrick Tobin, | 1087 days ago

Welcome back to 8 Exposures, our popular instant photography Q&A series! This week, we are happy to bring you French photographer Margot Gabel

1) What kind of Polaroid camera(s) do you use?

I use a common Polaroid Supercolor 645, it’s a cheap camera but I’m quite satisfied even if I secretly dream of a beautiful SX-70… I use a Fuji Instax Wide too because it’s a very nice format! I also have a Polaroid Colorpack II, a huge piece of plastic. I will test it soon with some black and white film!

2) Why do you like instant photography?

I’m fascinated by 35mm film & even more by instant films. In my childhood I loved watching the images appear on the little white square, I thought it was magic! I found this sensation learning to develop by hand in darkroom. But the handling is tedious. There is not this incredible instantaneous quality with 35mm film.

3) What is your earliest memory of instant film?

I think it was in front of the Christmas tree. We put our Dalmatian in front of my two sisters and me. It was very kitsch. We were dressed in Christmas colors, looking like candy canes and red and green flakes.

4) What’s your favorite Impossible film type?

I have only tested the color versions, but the one that makes me dream is PX 600 Black Frame

5) What are your favorite subjects to photograph?

I think more about what I’m shooting with my Polaroid than with my Canon AE1. I compose and locate places a long before pressing the shutter button! So I like to make absurd “mise en scène” with my friends in intriguing places..

6) Tell us about a project you’re working on.

This summer I want to experiment with some strange ways to develop film using red wine, citrus, acid.. I would like to see the limits of the film, playing with temperatures and mistreating pictures to cause colored reactions!

7) Who are your favorite photographers, instant or otherwise?

Tamara Lichtenstein, Baohien Ngo and Davis Ayer are using 35, 120 film and instant perfectly.. It’s mostly for fashion shootings but it’s always beautiful! I like them because they don’t manipulate their pictures digitally, they are using the films naturally to make outstanding images.

8) If you could take a photo of anyone or anything what would it be?

Dinosaurs, of course!

About Margot

I’m 21 years old. I live in Paris at the moment, and I just finished my degree in graphic design at Gobelins school! I’ve been shooting film since I was 14 years old. I started by developing black and white films and now I try as many films, formats and cameras as I can!

Thank you to Margot for taking part in 8 Exposures! To see more of her photos, please visit her Tumblr and her Facebook photo page. You can also follow her on Twitter at MRGT_.

No. 847

8 Exposures...with James Eakins

Patrick Tobin, | 1094 days ago

Welcome back to 8 Exposures, our popular instant photography Q&A series! This week, we are happy to bring you California-based photographer James Eakins.

1) What kind of Polaroid camera(s) do you use?

SLR 680, original SX-70, Land 450, Crown Graphic with a 4×5 Polaroid back and there is my newest obsession a Sinar P with a Polaroid 81-06 holder.

2) Why do you like instant photography?

Every instant camera is unique and leaves its own fingerprint on each frame, I love the breath you take before firing the shutter and the sound of the motor as it ejects. There is also something special about going on this journey with Impossible, trying each batch as it comes out and discovering its specific quirks and qualities.

3) What is your earliest memory of instant film?

My grandfather had a Sun 660 he would take shots of the family with whenever we would visit, I thought it was the coolest thing around.

4) What’s your favorite Impossible film type?

My favorite is PX 680.

5) What are your favorite subjects to photograph?

I’m a sucker for a building with a cloudy sky backdrop.

6) Tell us about a project you’re working on.

I collaborated on an 8×10 project this month with Jessica Reinhardt (whose photography I love and highly recommend everyone go check out), she and I will be collaborating more over the next few months. Shooting 8×10 Impossible was an incredible experience and am looking forward to the next steps we take with it.

7) Who are your favorite photographers, instant or otherwise?

Degas’ photo work has always been a heavy influence, it’s what made me want to pick up a camera. My favorite modern photographers are Penny Felts, Jon Anthøny Syverson, Toby Hancock, Michael Magoski and Mat Marash

8) If you could take a photo of anyone or anything what would it be?

I’d hop in the time machine, grab Edgar Degas and Charles Chaplin for a photo shoot on Hollywood Blvd circa 1940.

About James

Musician/photographer from Orange County, California.

Thanks to James for taking part in 8 Exposures! To see more of his photography visit dreaminginfilm.com and his Flickr photostream. You can also hear his music at broaddaylight.cc and follow him on Twitter at @broaddaylight.

No. 828

Viewfinder: James Joiner at Bonnaroo

Patrick Tobin, | 1136 days ago

Welcome back to Viewfinder, our ongoing series in which we chronicle interesting projects people are working on that incorporate Impossible film. This entry focuses on James Joiner’s trip to Bonnaroo…

Bonnaroo is freaking crazy.

Imagine being at the most ridiculous college party you can think of, but then imagine it’s you and ninety thousand of your closest friends. And Paul McCartney is playing on the porch. It’s basically like that, only crazier, and four days long.

Shooting Impossible film at music festivals has become the norm for me; I’ve spoken and written at length about the way the old Polaroid cameras allow me to get closer to my subjects and breed an instant comfort and familiarity. This hasn’t changed – if anything my continued use of the film has taught me a few tricks (did you know that Nikon’s SB700 speedlight has an optical slave mode that allows it to be triggered by a Polaroid camera’s onboard flash?), and has certainly gained me some access other photographers didn’t have. It has also taught me something I think we tend to forget in this all-digital age: patience and forethought.

When you’re only dealing with a finite amount of potential images – eight in a pack as compared to three thousand per card – and can only manage to shoot a frame or two every few seconds, it becomes imperative that you consider every push of the shutter button. This leads to a heightened level of observation, learning to judge just when that perfect moment is going to present itself as opposed to firing away like a machine gun and checking the results later. It leads to better results, less post-processing headache, and more of a sense of pride in what you’ve managed to capture.

Bonnaroo, like any other music festival, is as much about the audience as it is the bands. It’s the attendees who set the vibe for the event, their collective energy pushing and pulling you along for the ride as you work amongst them. My favorite images from an event like this, or at least the ones I come back to the most, are the Impossible Project ones of the crowd, little windows of captured light reflecting an exact moment in time.

The images here are from both Bonnaroo and the first Boston Calling music festival – full sets can be seen at my site www.jjamesjoiner.com under the Impossible Projects tab.

About James

James Joiner is a music, fashion and lifestyle photographer whose work has appeared in a plethora of publications including Paste, Rolling Stone, Esquire, the Lab, MySpace Music and Bullett. Follow his adventures on Instagram at @jjamesjoiner and via his all-Impossible diary www.impossibletosay.com.

No. 823

Dr. Love's Tips - S.U.C.K.

Patrick Tobin, | 1143 days ago

Welcome back to Dr. Love’s Tips where Impossible USA’s camera resource manager Frank Love provides helpful advice in order to get the best out of your Polaroid camera and Impossible film. This week: Sudden + Unexpected Camera Kak or S.U.C.K….

Have you ever put a brand new pack of film into your camera just to have it shoot every single frame of that pack right back out at you? This SUCKs doesn’t it? I refer to this as S.U.C.K. or Sudden + Unexpected Camera Kak, kak being another word for vomit that begins with a ‘k’ so the acronym works.

Now while my acronym may be somewhat made up, the actual problem of S.U.C.K. is very real. It’s real because you feel the pain of your precious film that cost you precious money being spit back at you in a manner that’s almost like your camera is sticking its tongue out at you out of spite, while wasting this thing you love and have worked hard to obtain. I’ve been there myself, I’m sure we all have at one point or another.

So what causes S.U.C.K.? Well, there’s really only one cause, but there are two forms of it. The cause is a camera-related issue. Simply, there are contacts within every integral Polaroid camera. Whether you have a folding SX-70, a 600 One Step, or a Spectra, they all share these basic contacts though they may come in different forms. Basically, the camera has these two contacts which tell it the duration of a ‘cycle’ to eject 1 frame of film. If you have a folding camera, removing the black plastic cover on the side to see the drivetrain (as referenced in the Mirror Mirror blog post), you can actually see what I’m referring to. You’ll see this flat metal piece move from back, to front, and back again during the cycle between these two black pieces. Under that black plastic are these two contacts. When the flat piece reaches the front, that’s midway through the cycle. When it returns to the back piece, that’s end of a cycle.

What happens in S.U.C.K. is a problem where that flat metal piece, or its equivalent in a box camera, doesn’t make the proper contact with the back contact switch to tell the camera to stop the cycle. So, what happens is, the flat piece is going to head back to the front piece again to cycle again…and round and round we’ll go. Now that flat piece is physically integrated as part of the pick arm, so what’s happening here is the pick arm will keep going back to grab another piece of film, and the motor is still running and moving the rollers. This means frame after frame will get spit out until either good contact is made, or the battery dies basically.

The two forms of S.U.C.K. are simply the fluke instances this happens, or when your camera has an actual issue. The fluke instances can be a totally freak thing, they can be brought on by humidity or schmutz on the contact preventing the proper connection. This is very likely to happen to you at least once over a long enough period of time and enough packs of film, I’m sorry to say. As to the ‘camera issue’ type, well if you have a box or Spectra camera…this is likely not fixable. Your actual best scenario is, using an empty pack, to try and open the door of the camera during the cycle at the end and continually loading and reloading the pack and opening the door until you can try to get it out of it’s ‘S.U.C.K.’ state. A little smacking of the camera on the side might help too.

If you have a folding camera, and your form of S.U.C.K. is the systemic kind, you can fix it if you feel comfortable…and ONLY if you feel comfortable…doing the following: You remove that black plastic cover piece as I mentioned earlier (Do this without film in the camera by the way, as you’ll need to cycle the camera to do it). So first after the cover is off, rotate that back gear as referenced in the ‘Mirror Mirror’ blog post, linked above, until you hear the mirror ‘slap’ up and see the flat piece move to the front. Once there, take a small flathead screwdriver, and on the inside of the back black piece, first rub the tip of the screwdriver against it to remove any residue or the like from it. After doing this, using an empty pack try cycling your camera again, if you can get it to consistently cycle Great! You’re good, if not, repeat the previous steps but then take that screwdriver and from the back of the camera, lightly push it towards the front of the camera…again…lightly. It should be just enough to ever-so-slightly bend/move it forward a little in position. There is a ‘sweet spot’ for this to be at. After trying a little adjustment, try the empty again.

Keep adjusting the back piece until you get a full cycle, so the last thing is that ‘snap’ of the pick arm. If you adjust and you don’t get the snap and you see the pick arm hasn’t gone back, you’ve likely adjusted too far forward. If after a little adjusting you still get inconsistent cycling, there is a deeper-seeded issue in your camera at play and you need to have it repaired.

I hope this helps coping with S.U.C.K. at least some, and as always,

Keep your rollers clean,

-f

No. 807

Viewfinder: Alison Turner's Reflected Identities

Patrick Tobin, | 1172 days ago

Welcome back to Viewfinder, our ongoing series in which we chronicle interesting projects people are working on that incorporate IMPOSSIBLE film. This entry focuses on a project from our friend Alison Turner called “Reflected Identities”…

When I look in the mirror, what I see reflecting back at me is usually not how I feel inside. Under the superficial layer of skin, hair and eye color, I am much more complex than my reflection reveals. My internal struggles and search for self-identity has given me plenty of bricks to build the wall high, while holding down an internal mix of intense feelings of anger, loss, jealousy, vulnerability, love, sadness and confusion.

They say that you are a direct reflection of your friends and the people you choose to surround yourself with. If this holds true, all of my friends in this series are a collective self portrait of who I am. “Reflected Identities” has allowed me to see and understand these feelings by looking closer at the faces and bodies of the people who are closest to me who are also learning to accept who they are right now.

For me, working on this project with impossible film has been a very vulnerable experience not only for myself but for my subjects as well. The beauty of Impossible film is that there is no masking or retouching involved so what develops is what you see. Aside from the color variances, the image depicts the emotion of the moment and that was what I was hoping to get for this series.

Thanks very much to Alison for sharing her project with us! To see more of her photography please visit alisontravels.blogspot.com.

No. 781

8 Exposures...with Andrew Bartram

Patrick Tobin, | 1199 days ago

Welcome back to 8 Exposures, our ongoing instant film Q&A series. This entry focuses on UK photographer Andrew Bartram

1) What kind of Polaroid camera(s) do you use?

Mainly SX-70 Originals, I have two of those but one has recently stopped working, SLR 680, 250 and 103 Automatic Land Cameras.

2) Why do you like instant photography?

I can’t draw, paint or play a musical instrument so, along with my passion for the darkroom instant photography allows me an accessible creative release from the day job.

Although I have been a film user and printer for 25 years I have only been into instant photography for the last year when I bought my first 600 box camera on Ebay, shortly followed by my first SX-70. I love the sheer unpredictable nature of the Impossible films, even the fabulous Color Protection film behaves in different ways depending on light, heat and the variables associated with your camera. So it’s that unpredictability, the uniqueness of each image combined with those wonderful Polaroid Cameras that I love about instant photography??

3) What is your earliest memory of instant film?

That’s a real tricky one – I remember reading about emulsion lifts in an photographic journal in the 1980s – that seemed pretty cool. The thought of actually shooting a Polaroid all those years back never occurred to me, I was too busy getting super sharp black and white images in the darkroom. You know what they say, you never really appreciate something till it’s gone…..

4) What’s your favorite Impossible film type?

I have been STAGGERED by the new CP films, I thought the COOL stock was pretty good but you still had to mess around with shielding. The earlier First Flush color films gave real nice results and I kind of miss those but hey, a big well done to the Impossible Folk for giving us that wonderful CP film.

I also shot a lot of the Paul Giambarba Blue Film marketed by the Impossible Project, like a lot of older Polaroid material it’s becoming hard to track down now at a reasonable price

5) What are your favorite subjects to photograph?

I have never had a favourite subject, as a famous American photographer said “I photograph things to see what they look like photographed”, that seems like a pretty good reason to me. Having said that I am really getting into portraits of strangers using the new Color Protection film. If you try to go up to an interesting character and stick an iPhone in their face you’ll probably end up wearing it!, approach them with an SLR 680, and SX-70 or a Polaroid Land Camera and you immediately have something to talk about, they are put at ease and almost always agree to have their picture taken. They are a bit surprised that they have to wait 30 mins to see the result though so I do try to go back and show them the finished result and occasionally give a copy away although that breaks my heart!

6) Tell us about a project you’re working on.

Impossible Faces is an emerging project – see previous answer, hoping to develop that on our trip to Vietnam in 2013.

Also I’ve been using the Polaroid Type 100 Blue film in my 250 Land Camera to photograph groups of swans on the River Ouse in Cambridgeshire, the film really seems to suit this subject and each image can never be repeated as the swans tend not to behave to order!

Expired Polaroid 669 has also become a big fave over the last 6 months although its becoming expensive to buy.

7) Who are your favorite photographers, instant or otherwise?

Where do you want me to start, I guess up to date favourites on Flickr include “The Gentleman Amateur” for, in particular his beautiful expired Polaroid shots, “Rommel” for his wonderful Impossible Images using SX-70 and medium format cameras, Peter McCabe for his Impossible, expired Polaroid and film studies of the female form and the talented Ben Innocent for his creative and engaging Impossible images. Sorry to single out four names as all my Flickr and twitter contacts continue to inspire me day in day out with their wonderful skills and knowledge.

I love reading about and looking at the images of Walker Evans, Garry Winogrand and Robert Frank, all great American Photographers. I was recently given a copy of Dune by Edward and Brett Weston and their sand dune images are just staggering.

8) If you could take a photo of anyone or anything what would it be?

That’s anther toughie….if it were a person then I’d say anyone with a face that speaks of a life well led…..if it is a place then I try looking out my back door or in the Fens of Cambridgeshire. It’s a great challenge to see your local environment through strangers eyes, to recognise beauty in what for you, is the everyday and even mundane.

About Andrew

Born and raised in Great Yarmouth on the East Coast of the UK been living in the Cambridgeshire Fenlands for 12 years with my Wife and two children.

Day time job too boring to mention but big love to Darkroom and anything analogue – even my kids are beginning to get it!

To see more of Andrew’s work, visit his Flickr photostream. You can also follow him on Twitter at @warboyssnapper.

No. 603

8 Exposures...with Caleb Jenkins

Patrick Tobin, | 1392 days ago

Welcome back to 8 Exposures, our popular instant film Q&A series. This entry focuses on Virginia photographer Caleb Jenkins

1) What kind of Polaroid camera(s) do you use?

As of now I have a single SX-70 Sears Special with the original skin, two 600 cameras, two Spectra cameras and one 420 Land Camera. Among those, my SX-70 is my favorite and most used. I love the history and pop culture behind the SX-70 camera and how vintage and iconic it is. I’m a big fan of the 70s, so my SX-70 is a perfect fit for me.

2) Why do you like instant photography?

Seeing as this question has been answered many times before me it’s quite hard to sum up an answer that isn’t anywhere near cliche. I guess I’ll have to go ahead and conform to all other answers, because instant photography is simply magical. I love that with each image I take, it’s the only image that will ever look that way. It’s truly a single edition. One main reason that I’ve been pulled into instant photography is that I feel it brings me back to reality. Having grown up in a digitally prosperous generation that knows no such thing as simplicity I find it refreshing to be a part of something that doesn’t need wifi or cables to work. And as simple as it is, it’s challenging at the same time. I hate that digital photography seems so clean and way too easy to take. If I ended this section right there then I’d be leaving out a major reason. Without a doubt, the Impossible and instant photography community is the greatest community to be a part of. Everyone is helpful, friendly and just easy to get along with. I’ve made numerous friends through instant photography that otherwise I would have never known, and I thank instant photography for that. Overall, the feelings I get from instant photography are almost impossible to put into words, but as we all know, nothing is impossible.

3) What is your earliest memory of instant film?

Unlike most people, I grew up in a household that was lacking a Polaroid. The only camera I can really remember growing up was a big autofocus Nikon SLR.

4) What’s your favorite Impossible film type?

When I entered the world of Impossible film I started shooting PX 70, so that has to be one of my all-time favorites. However, since the release of the COOL film line that’s been the only film in my SX-70. I’ve noticed though that my tastes in film change with each season. In late autumn and throughout winter, Silver Shade seems to suit my style of photos and then during spring, summer, and early autumn, Color Shade reigns supreme in capturing the wonderful colors and tones that appear in those months.

5) What are your favorite subjects to photograph?

I’ll take a photo of anything that I think would look great once captured. However, I’ve come to find out that I enjoy taking macro photos and photos of vintage things of all sorts more than anything, no matter the subject. When I’m not taking macro photos I love to walk around my hometown or nearby cities and search for vintage industrial buildings or industrial-related things that are turning into modern ruins.

6) Tell us about a project you’re working on.

Back in April I started a project using PX 70 and PX 70 COOL film entitled “Growth”. It chronicles the growth of a garden from start to finish during a time when saving money by means of having a garden is needed more than ever. It was the first garden we tended to since I was a little kid and being older now it was truly a learning experience for me. Before starting the project I had already began using Impossible film, but I knew right away that instant film, more specifically Impossible film, was the correct choice to document the experience. I love how Impossible film and growing a garden connect on so many levels. They both are very unpredictable and many things are out of the hands of the beholder. For example, I have no control over whether or not my photo will develop correctly and I also have no control over the weather itself. Striving to document our first garden in years not only taught me about what I need to know to survive, but I gained valuable knowledge on using my SX-70 and Impossible film. I truly realized that with both gardening and documentation with Impossible film that I must deal with what is handed to me and make decisions based on previous encounters and what is trying to be achieved. That’s what I wanted to achieve with this project. I didn’t want it to just be photos, I wanted it to be an overall learning experience for myself and hopefully others, and I feel I achieved that. As of right now, I’m expecting my last photo of the series to be in the middle of October, but that’s not set in stone.

7) Who are your favorite photographers, instant or otherwise?

After much consideration, I’ve found that there really aren’t any well-known photographers that are my favorites. I mean don’t get me wrong, I love all of Ansel Adams’ and Andy Warhol’s work along with all of the original Magnum Photographers and LIFE photographers, but if I really had to chose, I’d say that my parents and ancestors who had access to a camera are my favorite photographers. I’ve came to this conclusion, because being able to see family that were way before my time is important in seeing the differences of times between myself and past relatives. Also, it’s immensely important to me to have photos of myself when I was young and being able to look back at those photos in years to come. In addition to the personal importance of photos documenting myself and family, my inspiration for photography lies in previously-stated photographers and photographs, but also the instant film community. The photos I see everyday from the Flickr and Twitter community are getting more amazing as the days go on. The feedback and general conversations I have regularly with fellow twitter folks are truly inspirational to me. It’s yet another part of photography that I thoroughly enjoy.

8) If you could take a photo of anyone or anything what would it be?

I’ve always wanted to travel across the whole of Europe. I’m especially drawn toward ruins both ancient and new in the UK, but what I’d really love to do is travel across all of Europe with an unlimited supply of Impossible film and capture the various cultures and landscapes I encounter while there. I’m obsessed with the idea of shooting photography like this as fine art, but more importantly as documentation and ways to preserve memories, and what better way than to preserve those memories with Impossible film.

About Caleb

Since the start, shooting Impossible Film has become a full time love affair. I have goals of incorporating film and instant film back into people’s everyday lives.

Thank you to Caleb for taking part in 8 Exposures! You can follow him on Twitter at @Caleb_Jenkins.

No. 599

8 Exposures...with Claire Oring

Patrick Tobin, | 1395 days ago

Warmest greetings to you, Impossible friends! Welcome back to 8 Exposures, our instant film Q&A series. Our star this week is Los Angeles-based photographer Claire Oring

1) What kind of Polaroid camera(s) do you use?

I use a regular Polaroid 600 One Step and a Polaroid Spectra. I also just got an old Land Camera I’m refurbishing.

2) Why do you like instant photography?

I love watching all the colors and textures bloom in the palm of my hand.

3) What is your earliest memory of instant film?

I started using instant film when I was 15 and my dad gave me his old camera. I have a box under my bed with hundreds of Polaroids I took in high school.

4) What’s your favorite Impossible film type?

I loved the PX 680 Gold Frame color shade because it was fancy.

5) What are your favorite subjects to photograph?

Nature, magic, adventure, folklore, and young ladies. Almost all my work is some combination of those elements with a hint of mystery.

6) Tell us about a project you’re working on.

I was savoring the idea of my mermaid series Fin for months and now it finally exists. I’ve been working on a collaboration with Billabong Australia and Billabong USA over the past six months. My illustrations and photos are on their clothing and everything is just about to come out. I get to shoot creative photos all the clothes this month. Dream come true!

7) Who are your favorite photographers, instant or otherwise?

I probably look up to classical painters more than photographers. I love the stories and symbolism they incorporate in each work of art. When looking for inspiration I go to museums and take notes on the back stories from my favorite paintings.

8) If you could take a photo of anyone or anything what would it be?

A centaur. I have yet to figure that one out.

About Claire

I’m a 23-year-old photographer from Los Angeles with an overactive imagination and a burning love for instant film.

Thank you to Claire for taking part in 8 Exposures! Be sure to visit her website,
www.claireoring.com and follow her on Twitter at @Claire_Oring.

No. 592

The Camera Museum: Polaroid Business Edition

Patrick Tobin, | 1401 days ago

The Polaroid Business Edition camera was first released in the early 1990s. It was similar in body style to Polaroid’s Sun 600 series but has a more advanced flash system with automatic charging, and a built-in sliding close-up lens.

It was a sister camera to the Polaroid Job Pro camera, but aimed toward a different market, “Designed for extra durability and ruggedness.”

The Business Edition has a single-element 116mm plastic lens, fixed focus with a standard minimum focal length of 4 feet (2 feet when close-up lens is in place), electronic shutter, programmed auto-exposure system and a built-in flash.

The Business Edition works with all of Impossible’s 600 film, which can be found HERE

To purchase your own Business Edition Camera Kit, click HERE

No. 572

The Camera Museum: Polaroid Job Pro

Patrick Tobin, | 1416 days ago

The Polaroid Job Pro, first released in 1992, was designed with construction and work sites in mind. It is essentially the same as the One Step Flash and Supercolor cameras, with a sliding close-up lens, but the Job Pro is a bright ‘safety’ yellow, to highlight its suitability for industrial use. A sticker with quick instructions is attached to the back of the camera. Some versions of the Job Pro have the words “The Construction Camera” near the film slot.

The Polaroid Job Pro features a single-element 116mm fixed-focus plastic lens with the sliding close-up lens, Polaroid’s Light Management System, in the form of an exposure compensation switch under the lens and a built-in flash.

The Job Pro is compatible with all of Impossible’s 600-series film, which can be purchased HERE

Interested in picking up your own Job Pro camera? Check out our Job Pro – Back To Work Camera Kit

No. 565

8 Exposures...with Jessica Shimek

Patrick Tobin, | 1423 days ago

Hello, Impossible friends! Welcome back to 8 Exposures, our instant film Q&A series. This week, we bring you Minnesota artist and photographer Jessica Shimek

1) What Polaroid cameras do you use?

A Polaroid SX-70, A Polaroid Spirit 600, a 240 Land Camera and a Polaroid back on my Hasselblad 501c/m.

2) Why do you like instant photography?

Every photography medium has a different feeling and portrays a different mood. I love the mood that instant photography gives me. It is warm and sometimes a bit faded…this will sound cheesy, but I feel like each image is a tangible bit of a memory.

3) What is your earliest memory of instant film?

I don’t know that I have an earliest memory that I can really remember. Polaroids and instant film were just always there. My parents had a Polaroid 600 camera and took tons of photos of me when I was younger. I grew up with it. It was never not a thing. I don’t remember the first time I watched an instant photo develop, but I remember that it was magical every time.

4) What is your favorite Impossible type film?

Hands down, the new Cool film. I’m seriously in love with everything about that film. My second favorite is the Black Frame PX 600 film. That is my favorite monochrome film produced by Impossible.

5) What are your favorite subjects to photograph?

Mostly, I just photograph life. I have a camera with me all the time. I photograph where I am, I go on photo walks and photograph what I find. I love photographing architecture, and old run down buildings, and empty prairies. I adore night photography and photographing the lights wherever I am. Now that I feel more in sync with my SX-70, I plan to experiment with more long exposures using it. Stay tuned!

6) Tell us about a project you are working on

Digital dreams of life is a series I have been working on for quite awhile now, and I don’t think I’m anywhere close to finishing yet. Using my film images, I layer them together in Photoshop and create different made-up worlds and stories. Recently, I have been using many more instant Impossible images in my compilations. I think a lot of this project comes from being a science fiction geek and being married to one. I imagine what a place might look like through augmented reality goggles, if you could see its history and future together, or what a place wants to be.

7) Who are your favorite photographers, instant or otherwise?

Look through the list of people I follow on Twitter. I follow so many amazing and inspiring photographers, and there are too many of them to list here! Laura Migliorino, Cate Vermeland, Gary Hallman and Bruce Charlsworth were all great influences to me during my college years, and still are. Cindy Sherman, Diane Arbus, Dorothea Lange, and so many more.

8) If you could take a photo of anyone or anything, what would it be?

I think my answer to this question could change daily! My short list today is: the set and cast of Doctor Who, Australia, London, Berlin, and outer space (thanks to Mars Curiosity).

About Jessica

I am a Minnesota girl. I have spent this part of my life living just outside of Minneapolis, creating art, taking photographs, and working at my parents’ restaurant in between.

To see more of Jessica’s work, please visit her Flickr photostream. You can also follow her on Twitter at @Moonsweetie.

No. 554

Dr. Love's Tips – Formats and Materials and Machinery - OH MY!

Patrick Tobin, | 1429 days ago

It’s time for another edition of Dr. Love’s Tips, in which Impossible USA’s Camera Resource Manager Frank Love provides you with advice on how to get the best out of your camera and Impossible film. This week’s entry will hopefully offer some answers to the oft-asked questions about pack film, 4×5 film and roll film…

We have gotten many requests, questions, and pleas about creating more than just the amazing formats of SX-70, Spectra, and 600 film since the initial announcement of The Impossible Project. These requests have especially been renewed recently with the unveiling of our new 8×10 film.

I just want to take a moment to explain how it is we have come to be manufacturing the films we do, and why we aren’t making other formats.

To start, we have to look at Polaroid’s manufacturing setup: There was no singular Polaroid plant to produce their films. Polaroid did have one plant that produced all the raw paper and negative material which was located here in the US in Massachusetts. Then Polaroid had a plant in Enschede where the integral format films were produced (SX-70, Spectra/1200, 600), and in Mexico they had yet another facility that produced the peel-apart films. The trick with this means, that to be able to produce all the Polaroid films, you need all the plants/factories, or at least the right components from each.

This is one of the largest reasons why Impossible went back to the drawing board when producing the integral films. The factory that was saved was specifically the integral factory in Enscede, Holland that had the millions of dollars worth of what is effectively just assembly machinery. The facility in Waltham, MA that produced the raw materials had been long closed and gutted by this point behind the scenes. This means that the core ingredients were not producible, add to that the change in environmental laws for others, and you have a film formula that cannot be produced anymore. This began the reconstitution of a new supply chain with new materials and a new overall formula to create new Impossible film.

So this explains the films we are making…what about the rest?

The 8×10 production came by a stroke of luck, as the machines had simply been disconnected and moved to a warehouse in MA instead of being disassembled and sold off. They were discovered there by Impossible and then acquired and moved to what was now our plant in Holland. Thankfully as the 8×10 did not produce on the mass scale as the smaller formats, the machinery was not the size of a large room, but rather was portable enough to move. We have also produced 20×24 film, but these have been one-off hand-cut pieces and is also possible because the demand isn’t at production scale, so machines aren’t needed, and a higher cost is acceptable.

As to the other peel-apart formats (4×5, type 100 and type 80), these were produced in Polaroid’s Waltham and Mexico factories. These factories were closed and the machinery was dismantled and scrapped, sadly. Some have also asked about the earlier peel apart ‘roll-film’ formats of the first Polaroid cameras. Polaroid ceased the manufacturing of these formats in 1992, and the capabilities to produce this film has been long gone. It was also discontinued because it was more problematic versus pack film, and produced more waste as well.

Without these machines for the pack films or 4×5, production would have to be hand-made, which would mean extremely limited quantities at extremely high prices. If Polaroid hadn’t dismantled these machines, these formats could be in the same boat as the 8×10, retooled and re-imagined. To rebuild the machines would be a simply cost-prohibitive investment. So as of the current situation, with current machinery available, there are no plans to make any formats other than SX-70, 600 and Spectra/Image. This doesn’t mean it can never happen, but we can’t predict what may happen to change these circumstances.

I hope this helps in clearing up any questions people have, and as always…

keep your rollers clean,

-f

No. 547

The Camera Museum: Polaroid's See-Through Sun 660

Patrick Tobin, | 1436 days ago

The Polaroid Sun 660 Autofocus camera was first released in 1981. It is similar in style to the earlier 600 cameras, with a rigid plastic body, but the Sun 660 utilizes Polaroid’s patented Sonar Autofocus technology. The distance to the subject is calculated by firing a high-frequency sound wave that bounces back to a gold-colored receiver beside the lens. The minimum focal length for the Sun 660 is 3 feet.

The see-through Sun 660 was actually a dealer model. It was given to camera shops so that they could demonstrate the functions and inner workings of Polaroid 600 cameras to customers.

The Sun 660 features a single-element 116mm, f/11 plastic lens, electronic shutter, built-in flash and Polaroid’s Light Management System, allowing the user to make exposure adjustments via a lighten/darken switch under the lens.

While this particular see-through version of the Sun 660 doesn’t work at all (light would leak right through the transparent plastic, exposing the film!), The standard Sun 660 works with any of Impossible’s 600-series film. For a complete selection of compatible films, click HERE

To buy a standard Sun 660 camera kit for yourself, click HERE.

No. 539

The Camera Museum: Polaroid's Neon Cool Cam

Patrick Tobin, | 1443 days ago

In 1988, Polaroid released its Cool Cam, which was essentially the Sun 600 with flashy colors and branded with the “Cool Cam” moniker. It came in several color combinations, including Pink & Grey and the Red & Black. More rare is the Neon version, pictured here! The Cool Cam also came with a matching carrying case and a sheet of word bubble stickers that could be adhered to your photos to add some COOLNESS!

The Cool Cam features a single-element 116mm plastic lens, fixed focus, with minimum focal length of 4 feet, electronic shutter, programmed auto-exposure system and a built-in electronic flash.

The Cool Cam works with all of Impossible’s 600 films. For a complete list of compatible films, click HERE

You can also click HERE for a Polaroid 600 camera manual

No. 532

The Camera Museum: Polaroid Supercolor 635

Patrick Tobin, | 1450 days ago

The Supercolor 635 was one of many variations in the simple plastic-bodied 600 camera line featuring the Light Management System.

A basic 600-series camera, the Supercolor 635 features a 116mm single-element plastic lens, fixed focus with a minimal focal length of 4 feet, electronic shutter and a built-in electronic flash. It is similar to the Sun 600 series in design, except for the beloved rainbow stripe which would be a characteristic true of the later Supercolor 635 CL edition as well.

To see a user manual for Polaroid 600 cameras like the Supercolor 635, click HERE.

The Supercolor 635 works with any of Impossible’s 600-speed film. For a complete selection of compatible films, click HERE

No. 524

The Camera Museum: Polaroid Amigo 620

Patrick Tobin, | 1457 days ago

The Amigo 620 was introduced in the early 1980s for Polaroid’s 600-series integral film. The Amigo is a strange model because, although it lacks a built-in flash (a socket on its flip-up hood requires special “Flash 600” flashbars), it does include the added sliding close-up lens, allowing for photos as close as 2 feet.

The Amigo has a single-element 116mm plastic lens, fixed focus of 4 feet (2 feet with close-up lens), electronic shutter, and exposure correction dial and a creamy tan plastic body.

When shooting in low light or indoors, you’ll need “Flash 600” flash bars, which can be found on Ebay or Craigslist from time to time (Sorry, the Impossible Flash Bar by Mint has a very different contact and will not work on 600 flashless cameras like the Amigo!)

The Amigo 620 works with any of Impossible’s 600 film, which can be purchased HERE

No. 503

The Camera Museum: Polaroid Sun 650 SE

Patrick Tobin, | 1478 days ago

The Sun 650 SE was one of many variations in the simple plastic-bodied 600 camera line.

A basic 600-series camera, the Sun 650 SE features a 116mm single-element plastic lens, fixed focus with a minimal focal length of 4 feet, plus a sliding close-up lens, allowing for photos as close as 2 feet, electronic shutter and a built-in electronic flash. It is similar to the Sun 600 series in design, except for the blue accents on the nameplate and the sliding close-up lens, and the blue button, which often signified a Polaroid special edition.

The Sun 650 SE works with any of Impossible’s 600-speed film. For a complete selection of compatible films, click HERE

To see a user manual for Polaroid 600 cameras like the Sun 650 SE, click HERE

No. 484

The Camera Museum: Polaroid's Cool Cam

Patrick Tobin, | 1492 days ago

In 1988, Polaroid released its Cool Cam, which was essentially the Sun 600 with flashy colors and branded with the “Cool Cam” moniker. It came in several color combinations, including Pink & Grey and the pictured Red & Black. The Cool Cam also came with a matching carrying case and a sheet of word bubble stickers that could be adhered to your photos to add some COOLNESS!

The Cool Cam features a single-element 116mm plastic lens, fixed focus, with minimum focal length of 4 feet, electronic shutter, programmed auto-exposure system and a built-in electronic flash.

The Cool Cam works with all of Impossible’s 600 films. For a complete list of compatible films, click HERE

You can also click HERE for a Polaroid 600 camera manual

No. 467

The Camera Museum: Polaroid Supercolor 635

Patrick Tobin, | 1506 days ago

The Supercolor 635 was one of many variations in the simple plastic-bodied 600 camera line featuring the Light Management System. Polaroid released so many slightly different iterations in this line of cameras. This particular model has a silver face in place of the more common black face of Supercolors, and contains no sliding close-up lens.

A basic 600-series camera, the Supercolor 635 features a 116mm single-element plastic lens, fixed focus with a minimal focal length of 4 feet, electronic shutter and a built-in electronic flash. It is similar to the Sun 600 series in design, except for the beloved rainbow stripe which would be a characteristic true of the later Supercolor 635 CL edition as well.

The Supercolor 635 works with any of Impossible’s 600-speed film. For a complete selection of compatible films, click HERE

No. 451

Impossible's 600 Camera Workshop Returns!

Patrick Tobin, | 1517 days ago

Sunday, June 10th, 2012
10:00 AM to 1:00 PM
Impossible Project Space
425 Broadway
5th Floor
New York
NY 10013
Photo by James Matthew Carroll

Continuing our Impossible Workshop series, we are pleased to announce the return of a classic workshop on one of our favorite cameras, the Polaroid 600 camera. The Impossible Project will hold a three hour interactive workshop on maximizing Impossible film in the Polaroid 600 Camera.

In the workshop, participants will be guided through the ins and outs of the Polaroid 600 series camera with a knowledgeable Impossible expert staffer. Workshop participants will learn introductory and intermediate techniques to master their 600 camera including exposure and functionality. The workshop will include an in depth overview of shooting Impossible Project film including light shielding, temperature control and image preservation.

Workshop participants will be led on an interactive photo walk with one of Impossible’s experienced staff photographers, capturing the photogenic charm of downtown New York as they explore SOHO, Chinatown and Little Italy. The group will then reconvene back at the space to review images, ask questions and talk about image storage and preservation.

Fee is $50 (price includes 1 pack PX 680 Color Shade COOL film & Frog Tongue)

To register, please call (212) 219 3254 or email nycspace@theimpossibleproject.com
Please notify when registering if you’d like to borrow a camera at no extra cost.

No. 438

The Camera Museum: Polaroid OneStep Express

Patrick Tobin, | 1527 days ago

In 1997, Polaroid reissued their plastic-bodied 600 cameras with a more modern, rounded trim. The Polaroid OneStep Express camera is otherwise the same as the earlier One Step Flash, with a built-in flash and a sliding close-up lens. It came in various color schemes, most common being the pictured green & grey and navy blue & grey.

The Polaroid OneStep Express sports a single-element 116mm plastic lens, fixed focus of 4 feet (2 feet with the close-up lens in place), electronic shutter, programmed automatic exposure and a built-in electronic flash.

The Polaroid OneStep Express works with all of Impossible’s 600 film. For a complete list of compatible films, click HERE.

To purchase your own Polaroid OneStep Express camera kit, click HERE.

No. 407

The Camera Museum: Polaroid 50th Anniversary Sun 600 SE

Patrick Tobin, | 1548 days ago

In 1987, Polaroid celebrated its 50th anniversary. Fittingly, a special edition of the popular Sun 600 LMS camera was released, with gold face and marked, “Polaroid 50, 1937-1987”.

Aside from its appearance, the Polaroid 50th Anniversary camera sported the same features as the earlier Sun 600 LMS. A basic 600-series camera, the 50th Anniversary camera features a 116mm single-element plastic lens, fixed focus with a minimal focal length of 4 feet, electronic shutter and a built-in electronic flash.

Additionally, this special-edition camera was accompanied with a matching “Polaroid 50” carrying case.

The 50th Anniversary Sun 600 works with any of Impossible’s 600-speed film. For a complete selection of compatible films, click HERE

No. 395

The Camera Museum: Polaroid OneStep 600 Talking Camera

Patrick Tobin, | 1554 days ago

In 1997, Polaroid released possibly their most gimmicky camera: The OneStep 600 Talking Camera. The camera came with several pre-recorded messages, and could also be used to record speech (or music) which is played via a loudspeaker just before taking your photo. The sound effects can be switched off completely if preferred, which you very well may. The pre-recorded messages apparently vary according to the territory the camera was marketed in, and include American and Spanish versions. The US version’s pre-recorded messages include, “Smile, you funny person!” and “Cheese for me, cheese for you, everybody cheese-a-roo!”

Aside from the talking capabilities, the OneStep Talking Camera functions identically to the OneStep CloseUp camera. It features a single-element 116mm plastic lens, fixed focus with a minimum focal length of 4 feet (2 feet with the sliding close-up lens in place), electronic shutter, programmed automatic exposure with a sliding exposure compensation dial and built-in electronic flash.

The OneStep Talking Camera works with all of Impossible’s 600 film. For a complete selection of compatible films, please click HERE

No. 382

The Camera Museum: Polaroid Sun 660 AF

Patrick Tobin, | 1562 days ago

The Polaroid Sun 660 Autofocus camera was first released in 1981. It is similar in style to the earlier 600 cameras, with a rigid plastic body, but the Sun 660 utilizes Polaroid’s patented Sonar Autofocus technology. The distance to the subject is calculated by firing a high-frequency sound wave that bounces back to a gold-colored receiver beside the lens. The minimum focal length for the Sun 660 is 3 feet.

The Sun 660 features a single-element 116mm, f/11 plastic lens, electronic shutter, built-in flash and Polaroid’s Light Management System, allowing the user to make exposure adjustments via a lighten/darken switch under the lens.

The Polaroid Sun 660 works with any of Impossible’s 600-series film. For a complete selection of compatible films, click HERE

To buy a Sun 660 camera kit for yourself, click HERE

No. 366

Dr. Love - The Importance of Being Shielded

Patrick Tobin, | 1573 days ago

Hello from Impossible! Dr. Love is back with another informative post in which he revisits the importance of shielding your images…

“Some people have asked some follow up questions to our Opacification post, and as the days are getting longer, we wanted to help stress the use of Impossible Films on those bright sunny summer days.

To simply summarize the main point from the opacification post, Impossible films are still sensitive to light in the first moments out of the camera. This is because the protective layer within the film that is there to protect the film can’t yet block out enough light in many situations that it needs an outside aide. (See photos below as examples of poorly-shielded and well-shielded images, respectively).

Depending on the camera you have, there are 3 very simple ways to protect your film in nearly every situation. If you have a standard ‘box type’ 600 or SX-70 camera (except One600 type), you can get a Frog Tongue and then you’ll never have to worry about whether you have a cover on your camera again. As well as a Frog tongue made for Spectra Cameras, this will always uncurl over the film keeping a good seal on it to help protect in even the brightest conditions like at the beach.

The next is if you have a folding camera like the Original SX-70s or an SLR 680, you can get the Impossible PX Shade, as this is similarly designed to keep close contact with the film frame as it is coming out of the camera to help prevent light from seeping in the sides and flash the film.

Lastly, if you’re in a pinch, every pack of film you start gives you a simple-to-use shade just from putting the pack in your camera, that of course is the dark slide. The dark slide is a black matte material that can be used is various ways depending on your camera type to help keep your film covered from strong light. To see an example of how to shield with a dark slide, watch this video

The main things to keep in mind are…
1. Film is most sensitive the first moment it starts to come out of the camera
2. The brighter your environment, the more of a need there is to shield and shield well
3. Even if in a darker space, remember that a long exposure with a little light can be the same as a quick exposure to bright light.

If you remember and apply these main points, you can’t go wrong, and using a Frog Tongue or PX Shade will let you shoot with more thought to your shot and less to how to handle it. Now get out there, enjoy the Spring, and happy shooting.

Keep your rollers clean,

-f

No. 363

The Camera Museum: Polaroid "Red Stripe" One Step Flash

Patrick Tobin, | 1576 days ago

The Polaroid Red Stripe One Step Flash was first released in the early 1990s. It was similar in body style to Polaroid’s Sun 600 series but has a more advanced flash system with automatic charging, and a built-in sliding close-up lens.

The Red Stripe One Step Flash has a single-element 116mm plastic lens, fixed focus with a standard minimum focal length of 4 feet (2 feet when close-up lens is in place), electronic shutter, programmed auto-exposure system and a built-in flash.

The Red Stripe works with all of Impossible’s 600 film, which can be found HERE

To purchase your own Polaroid Red Stripe Camera Kit, click HERE

No. 343

Dr. Love - Under Pressure

Patrick Tobin, | 1587 days ago

This week, Impossible USA’s Camera Resource Manager Frank Love explains the importance of caring for your camera’s rollers…

The all important rollers, and why you need to keep them clean. The rollers in your camera are a vital and often overlooked part of instant photography. The condition of the rollers will directly affect any image that comes from your camera.

The rollers that are on every Polaroid Camera, however old or new it is, large or small, one film type or another, they are what make the ‘magic’ of instant film possible. The rollers are what the film passes through to initiate the development of the film and print. Every piece of instant film from Polaroid to Impossible, of all sizes, has two main components that make it all work. The first is the film itself, which depending on the format, is either one complex piece of film which is film negative and print integrated together (integral film), or two separate pieces, one negative and one positive print, (peel-apart film). The second component is the ‘pod’ or pods which contain the developer or ‘reagent’ which is the chemistry that remains sealed until the rollers burst the seem to spread the chemistry across the film in order to process it.

This may seem a fairly simple and easy feat, however this part of the process is sensitive and will make for very apparent issues if the rollers are not in good condition or get dirty.

One way to get an idea of how your rollers will affect the development of your images is to think of it like in baking, as though your rollers are like a rolling pin, and the film like dough. If you were to roll out dough and press harder on one side, it would be thinner than the other. If you were to bake the dough like this, it wouldn’t bake evenly, the thin part would cook through much faster while the thicker part wouldn’t cook all the way through. Also, if a wad of dough was to get stuck on the rolling pin when rolling it out, you would get some indentations in the dough again causing those spots to be thinner than the rest of the dough.

When there is too much pressure applied when spreading the developer across the film, it similarly ‘bakes too much’ and results in areas that appear over-exposed or even white. If you get white dots or patterns that repeat vertically up the film, it is likely from something on the rollers, much like a ‘wad of dough’, making impressions.

You can also get ‘spots’ on your film from simply grabbing the film from the camera with too much pressure, say with a finger nail.

If your image has varying shades from too light to too dark repeating back and forth, then the pressure from your rollers is uneven. If this is the case check for smooth movement of your rollers and ensure they are clean. If you have a folding SX-70/SLR 680 also be sure you do not hold your camera applying pressure to the bottom of the film door as this is where the film exits the camera and you can create pressure on the film doing this.

Thankfully if you have issues with your rollers, they can be cleaned very simply, or even replaced if they are bent or broken. You can also always refer to the ‘How To Make Impossible Images’ insert (see attached image), which is now included in every pack of Impossible film. As always of course, the easiest thing to do is to simply….keep your rollers clean.

-f

No. 334

The Camera Museum: Polaroid Impulse (Blue)

Patrick Tobin, | 1596 days ago

The Polaroid Impulse camera was introduced in 1988. Its body style was a bit of a change up from the boxy Polaroid cameras of the 1980s. The body is a hard-wearing plastic, and features rubber grips around the rear. Impulse cameras usually came in a dark gray color, but there were a variety of different colors released, including yellow, red, purple and blue (shown here).

The Impulse sports a single-element plastic lens with a fixed aperture (116mm, f9), fixed focus with a 4 foot minimum focal length, exposure compensation switch below the lens and a tripod-socket.

One big design difference unique to Impulse cameras is the electronic flash. The flash is raised by pressing down on a button on the top of the unit. The flash then pops up, and this also turns the camera on and retracts a lens cover. The lens cover slides into place when flash is pushed back down (which also turns off the camera). This means that the flash fires for every shot and cannot be overridden.

The Impulse works with all of Impossible’s 600-series film, which can be purchased HERE

No. 315

600 Workshop @ The Impossible Project NYC Space

Jon Campolo, | 1608 days ago

March 11 2012
10AM - 1PM
The Impossible Project Space NYC

Perfecting Impossible Techniques with a Classic Camera!

Back by popular demand, The Impossible Project is pleased to announce the return of The 600 Workshop at the NYC Space! On Sunday, March 11, the Impossible team will hold a three-hour interactive tutorial on getting the best out of the classic Polaroid 600 camera and Impossible’s film range. The workshop is designed to explore the full potential and versatility of any 600 series camera, including personal tricks you’re not likely to learn anywhere else! Workshop participants will then be guided on an interactive photo walk with one of Impossible’s experienced staff photographers, exploring and capturing the richly photogenic cusp of SOHO, Chinatown and Little Italy. We’ll finally re-convene back at the space to discuss images, ask questions and talk about image preservation techniques.

WHEN: SUNDAY, MARCH 11, 2012, 10:00 AM to 1:00 PM
WHERE: Impossible Project Space: 425 Broadway, 5th Floor, Between Howard & Canal Streets
REGISTER: nycspace@theimpossibleproject.com or +1 212 219 3254
Please notify when registering if renting a camera at no extra cost!
FEE: US$ 50 (price includes 1 pack PX 680 Color Shade FF & Frog Tongue)

No. 306

The Camera Museum: Polaroid Supercolor 635 CL

Patrick Tobin | 1617 days ago

The Polaroid Supercolor 635 CL camera is one of numerous variations on the box-style plastic bodied 600 cameras produced throughout the 80s and early 90s. The Supercolor 635 CL has the trademark rainbow stripe down the face.

The Supercolor 635 CL has a 116mm single-element plastic lens, fixed focus, programmed automatic exposure system and a built-in electronic flash. One nice feature on the Supercolor 635 CL is the sliding close-up lens, allowing the user to get photos as close to their subject as 2 feet, unlike many other 600 cameras with a minimal focal length of 4 feet.

The Supercolor 635 CL works with any of Impossible’s 600-series film, which can be found HERE

We also have Supercolor camera kits available HERE

No. 300

The Camera Museum: Polaroid Sun 600 LMS

Patrick Tobin, | 1624 days ago

The Polaroid Sun 600 LMS camera was first introduced in 1983. Though the exposure adjustment switch was available on several earlier models, it wasn’t christened the Light Management System until the Sun 600’s release.

A basic 600-series camera, the Sun 600 features a 116mm single-element plastic lens, fixed focus with a minimal focal length of 4 feet, electronic shutter and a built-in electronic flash.

Polaroid’s 600 cameras were well-known for their television commercials featuring James Garner and Mariette Hartley, and the Sun 600 LMS was no exception. Watch the 1983 commercial HERE

The Sun 600 LMS works with any of Impossible’s 600-speed film. For a complete selection of compatible films, click HERE

No. 289

The Camera Museum: Polaroid SLR 680

Patrick Tobin, | 1635 days ago

The Polaroid SLR 680 camera was first introduced in 1982, and was the only SLR ever produced for 600-series film*. It utilizes the same sonar autofocus technology as the 100-speed SX-70 Time Zero Autofocus models but also features a built-in electronic flash. The flash reflector even tilts to accommodate focal distance.

The SLR 680 sports a 4-element 116mm f/8 glass lens with a minimum focal length of 10.4 inches. It has an aperture range from f/8- f/22. Manual focus is possible via an override switch above the focusing wheel. The camera features a socket for a remote shutter release and also has a tripod socket and lugs for a neck strap.

The SLR 680 is compatible with any of the Impossible Project 600-series film, including PX 680 Color Shade First Flush film and PX 600 Silver Shade UV+ Black Frame film

For a full selection of film that will work in the SLR 680, please click HERE

To purchase an SLR 680 Camera kit, please click HERE

*The SLR 690 is identical to the 680 except for slight differences in the metering system. It is essentially the Japanese version of the SLR 680, so they are in the same family.

No. 242

The Turtle & The Whale.

Patrick Tobin, | 1689 days ago

We recently announced a new camera kit called the Express Camera PX Kit which features an Express camera, 1 pack of PX 680 film and a Frog Tongue.

We lovingly refer to the Express cameras as the Turtle and the Whale because of their respective green and blue colors. We were delighted to find that our friend Kim Oberski’s daughters Reese (8 years old) and Hannah (6 years old) were inspired to write short stories and draw pictures about the Turtle and the Whale!

Here is Reese’s story…

“Once upon a time, there was a Turtle and a Whale. It was that time of year were snow was on the ground. They decided to go sleding. Turtle did it a very weird way turtle slid down on it’s back. Whale did it a weird way too. Whale sprayed water on to the hill and it froze let snow go on it then slid down the hill! “Wow Whale your going so fast” yelled turtle. They both went sliding down the hill they crashed and laughed so had they did it over and over again. Turtle and Whale had lots of fun. When the day was over they went inside and went to bed. The End”

And here is Hannah’s story…

“Once upon a time there was a Turtle and a Whale. They went on a trip to Niagra Falls, but the trip was too long so they stopped for a break and on that break there was a lollipop store. In that store they bought green, red, and pink lollipops. But their lollipops were to small. So Whale couldn’t have any or he would choke, only Turtle go some lollipops. But Turtle saved them and tried to make one big lollipop for Whale. He stacked and stacked and stacked and stacked the lollipops until it was big enough for whale. So they all left for Niagra Falls and they lived happily ever after. The End”

Special thanks to Kim, and to Reese and Hannah for their charming drawings and stories! Pick up your own Express Camera PX Kit today, and make sure you have crayons handy in case you’re inspired to write your own story!

No. 205

Impossible USA 600 Camera Workshop

Patrick Tobin, | 1717 days ago

Sunday, November 20th; 10am-1pm
Impossible Project NYC Space
425 Broadway
5th Floor
New York
NY 10013

On Sunday, November 20th, The Impossible NYC space will hold a 3 hour interactive tutorial on getting the best out of your Polaroid 600 type camera and getting the most out of all the Impossible film range.

After briefly exploring your 600 camera’s full potential and versatility including unique accessories and attachments, we will then outline all that our new instant film has to offer. From shielding techniques to temperature control to identifying and managing each film types unique characteristics.

We’ll let you loose in the city streets to explore all the photogenic wonders of Soho, Little Italy and Chinatown with two of our experienced photographers and then re convene back at the space to discuss your images, ask questions and talk about image preservation techniques.

WHEN: Sunday November 20th, 2011, 10AM–1PM

WHERE: 425 Broadway, Floor 5, New York, NY 10013

REGISTRATION: $50 (price includes 1 pack PX 680 film & Impossible Frog Tongue)

Note: Please notify us when registering if renting a camera at no extra cost!

RSVP/QUESTIONS: (212) 219 3254 or nycspace@theimpossibleproject.com

No. 170

8 Exposures...With Charlie Wagers.

Patrick Tobin, | 1751 days ago

Welcome to a new feature on the Impossible Blog: 8 Exposures. We’ll be asking artists and photographers 8 questions revolving around photography, especially instant photography. Also included will be 8 Impossible images submitted by the featured artist.

Our inaugural edition of 8 Exposures focuses on Charlie Wagers, an Ohio-based graphic designer, art director and illustrator, and a founding member of Three Bears Design.

1) Q: What kind of Polaroid camera(s) do you use?

A: I have a vintage folding SX-70 that I prefer to use, in addition to a bunch of old thrifted 600 cameras. I like the SX-70 because I can use 600 films in it, with a filter. And it folds up nicely, which makes it easy to carry around with me.

2) Q: Why do you like instant photography?

A: I always prefer analogue photography to digital. I most commonly photograph with 120 films in my Holga, so using instant cameras is a treat to see the photos within minutes. I especially appreciate the colors and new effects that come with using Impossible’s film types.

3) Q: What is your earliest memory of instant film?

A: Probably my parents telling me they wouldn’t buy me a Polaroid camera, because the film was too expensive when I was little. Another good memory (not very long ago) was in 2008, my friend Phil and I were living in Pittsburgh. When we found out Polaroid was discontinuing their instant film we drove 45 minutes outside of the city to buy $300 worth of 600 film.

4) Q: What’s your favorite Impossible film type?

A: This is a tough one. My favorite film was the PX-70 Push!, for the colors. I shot a pack of it on tour in March, and loved it. But also I really like borders on the Black Frame version of the PX 600 Silver Shade. Make a color film with black borders, and that will be the ultimate for me.

5) Q: What are your favorite subjects to photograph?

A: I have a weird obsession with old neon signs. I think I just really like to take present-day photos that look like they are from another era. I love using texture and vintage imagery within my graphic design work, and I try to find opportunities to utilize my (amateur) photography within my design work.

6) Q: Tell us about a project you’re working on

A: Right now I’m designing for some secret tour swag for Josh Ritter. I can’t say what, but it is based off of his lyric, “I’m still waiting for the whiskey to whisk me away.” And I love whiskey, so I jumped at the opportunity to create some appropriate imagery.

7) Q: Who are your favorite photographers, instant or otherwise?

A: Last year I saw a show at the Akron Art Museum called Detroit Disassembled by Andrew Moore. The photos were all humongous prints, and the subjects were abandoned buildings in Detroit. I am guilty of enjoying urban-exploration photography, and this show blew me away. I think it was the scale; the photos were very wide, and incredibly detailed. I also really appreciate work by Gregory Crewdson & Diane Arbus.

8) Q: If you could take any photo of anyone or anything what would it be?

A: Probably a shipwreck. I am obsessed with underwater photography, and love swimming. I’ve even tried the Holga in-a-plastic-bag technique. Additionally, I am a certified scuba diver, so maybe this goal is attainable.

Thanks very much to Charlie for participating! Stay tuned for future episodes of 8 Exposures featuring more interesting people from the analog community!

No. 107

600 Workshop @ Impossible NYC Space

Jon Campolo, | 1855 days ago

July 10 & 17, 2011
10AM - 1PM
Impossible NYC Space
425 Broadway
5th Floor
New York NY 10013

  • JULY 10 WORKSHOP FULL! EXTRA DATE ADDED ON SUNDAY JULY 17TH.

On Sunday July 10th, The Impossible NYC Space will hold a 3 hour interactive workshop on getting the best out of your Polaroid 600 camera and the most out of all the Impossible 600 films.

After briefly exploring your 600 camera’s full potential and versatility, we will then outline all that our new instant film has to offer – From shielding techniques to temperature control to identifying and managing each film’s unique characteristics.

We’ll let you loose in the city streets to explore all the photogenic wonders of SOHO, Little Italy and Chinatown with two of our experienced photographers and then re convene back at the space to discuss your images, ask questions and talk about image preservation techniques.

Time: 10:00am to 1:00pm
Special Introductory Price: $50 (includes one free pack of PX680 film and free use of a Polaroid camera)
Call the NYC Space to make your reservation today at (212) 219–3254