June 2011

9
No. 98

The Revival of Instant Film

Frank Love | 1903 days ago

A film team of Digifoto Pro recently visited the Impossible Factory in Enschede (NL) to create a fantastic film about “The Revival of Instant Film”

Follow director Maurits Reijnoudt into the Impossible Universe – Watch Here!

14
No. 99

Travelling with Impossible Films

Frank Love | 1898 days ago

Summer is near, and so are – if you’re lucky – holidays and travels. Don’t forget to pack your Polaroid cameras as well as a few Impossible films!

Watch or re-watch this video with Doctor Franck to learn how to properly store your film before departure and how to safely travel with film without risking xray damage to your film.

15
No. 100

The 365 Project

Frank Love, | 1897 days ago

Nate is currently working on THE 365 PROJECT – a photo a day project for 2011, using nothing but new films created for Polaroid camera’s by Impossible.

He is now quickly approaching 6 months of shooting every day with Impossible’s film – follow his Impossible Life HERE

16
No. 101

Special Edition "Impossible Rainbow" prints available

Josie Keefe, | 1896 days ago

Just arrived in our New York store – a special edition batch of 10 beautiful “Impossible Rainbow” prints available for sale! A treat for any Polaroid devotee, these exclusive prints fit perfectly in a 50cm x 70cm frame and are for sale for just $75. The prints were specially made for the Impossible Project by the talented Mark Griffiths, an artist and lifelong Polaroid enthusiast.

This exclusive deal is available at our NYC Space. Stop by or call our New York Space (212.219.3254) to grab one before they are gone.

Mark will be giving away one of these prints to a lucky winner. Visit his blog to enter the giveaway. Mark will randomly chose a winner from the comments on the site. Enter before June 24th for a chance to win one of these lovely prints!

More of Mark’s art is available for sale on his etsy store.

20
No. 102

Impossible Pop Up Store Vienna

Sarah Jungreithmayr, | 1892 days ago

On the occasion of POLAROID [IM]POSSIBLE we packed our moving boxes and transferred our Impossible Project Space Vienna to a Pop Up Shop location for the duration of the exhibition. Right next to WestLicht, we’re now turning the venue into the most analog instant hotspot of Vienna.

IMPOSSIBLE POP UP SHOP
JUNE, 17th – AUGUST 21st
Westbahnstraße 38
1070 Vienna, Austria

Mon, Tue, Wed, Fri: 12:00 – 19:00
Thu: 14:00 – 21:00
Sat: 11:00 – 19:00

vienna@the-impossible-project.com
The Impossible Project Space in Breite Gasse will be closed during this time.

24
No. 103

HOW TO USE PX 70 COLOR SHADE

Frank Love, | 1888 days ago

Truth be told, the speed (light sensitivity) of this film is not totally where we expected it to be for the average SX 70 camera, and especially in bright summer light, the tendency for overexposed images is high. So please make sure to adjust the lighten/darken wheel of your SX 70 camera to the darkest setting. With a little experimentation, you will find the right darken setting for your camera.

This slightly high film speed will yield simply amazing color and tones in your correctly exposed SX 70 pictures, but it also opens up the amazing possibility to use this magic material in your 600 camera without the need of any additional filters! Simply insert the film in your Polaroid 600 camera, if necessary, add a little lighten adjustment and surround yourself with colors!

26
No. 104

From Polaroid To Impossible

Patrick Tobin, | 1886 days ago

We are pleased to announce the release of the new book chronicling the history and evolution of the instant photograph, “From Polaroid To Impossible.”

Published in conjunction with the POLAROID (IM)POSSIBLE exhibition, this gorgeous 200-page book, printed by acclaimed German publisher Hatje Cantz, brings together instant masterpieces from legends such as Ansel Adams and Andy Warhol to current artists like David Levinthal, EJ Camp and Mary Ellen Mark. The book also contains introductory essays by Barbara Hitchcock, Achim Heine and Florian Kaps.

“From Polaroid To Impossible” is available in our online shop, and we currently have nine copies for sale at $51.90 USD at the NYC Impossible Project Space.

30
No. 105

Perfect your PX 680 Color Shade FF Images!

Frank Love | 1882 days ago

The more we shoot PX 680 Color Shade FF film the more we love it and our images are getting better and better. We’ve assembled some of our best tips and tricks and hope you find them useful!

• Warming your print for one to two minutes during development helps to bring out better tones and contrast. You can stick the print under your arm or on a warm surface. Be careful not to overheat your images or they’ll end up yellowed.

• To avoid green excess chemicals leaking into image from pods, cut pods on back to air dry. Place the images in a plastic bag, seal tightly and store upright in fridge.

• If you’re shooting PX680ff in a SX 70 using a ND filter and getting less than colorful images try removing the filter and turning your L/D wheel all the way to darken. This works well indoors and on more overcast days. Please keep in mind that all SX 70s are different and this may not work for everyone.

• If you’re shooting on hot days and your camera gets warm your photos will tend to have an orange/pink hue, on cooler days or in an air conditioned space the colors will be much more true to life.

and of course…

ALWAYS SHIELD YOUR IMAGES FROM LIGHT FOR THE FIRST MINUTE!

Frank Love has carefully analyzed the best way to work with high-contrast scenes and has this to say:

“When shooting high-contrast scenes, you can change the focus of your shot using exposure. You can set your camera to under or over expose the shot to better define what your focus is. Whether you want to see the person sitting in the shadows, or keep your background reigned in, here you can see how adjusting your L/D wheel changes the shot.”

No. 106

Trick out your PX 680 Color Shade FF

Frank Love | 1882 days ago

Patrick Tobin created a nifty technique called a “controlled flash/burn.” He explains how to use it below:

With PX 680, because it takes longer to develop, it is possible to perform controlled flashes/burns on your image during the first few minutes of development. If you would like to “burn” text or shapes onto your photos, you can do the following.

1. Cut the words/shapes out of a piece of construction paper or darkslide, stencil-style, with siccors or an exact knife.

2. Have it at-the-ready for when making an exposure. When the print ejects from the camera, keep it shielded with the darkslide.

3. Quickly, take the print, covered by the darkslide, to a bright light source, preferably a window that gets a lot of sunlight.

4. Lay your stencil over the print and darkslide, lining up exactly where you’d like your burn to show up on your image, and slide the darkslide out from between the stencil and the print, allowing sunlight to leak onto your image in the shape you have cut.
The faster you do all of the above, the better. The print is uber light sensitive for the first minute or so especially. Also, it is a good idea to leave some dark space on your print where you’d like to leave your burn, so that the words/shapes stand out. As you can tell, some planning goes into this process, but it is fun to do.

No. 1006

Celebrating Impossible Women #5

Lucile Le Doze, | 899 days ago

Sarah Seené

This is our fifth article focusing only on Impossible women! Yesterday and today, we have feature many projects done by women. Have a look at them here!

We have already presented five women who took part in our ongoing series Instant Photographer Profiles. Today, we want to showcase three more of them: Sarah Seené, Sarah Elise Abramson and Elegia.

Sarah Seené is 26. She comes from the east of France but has been living in Poitiers, a small, beautiful city in the rural west of France, for four years. She is not only an instant photographer but a director of short experimental films in which she explores themes of loneliness and the relation between reality and dreams. She is currently working in a documentary about an artist who creates sculptures with toys and dead animals.
I’m a dreamer, I’m thinking about my Polaroid projects every day when I’m walking, when I’m swimming, when I’m talking with people and even when I’m sleeping. My models, most of them female, are the ones that I love. I like inventing stories, universes, characters that inspire me. What interests me through my fabrication are feelings, inspired by people, nature and animals. My vision of instant photography is to create a new world with elements of reality.” – Discover Sarah’s interview here

Elegia lives with her two cats – Baby Blue and Gypsy Lou and has “a boring part-time job which pays the bills, but allows me to have my days and weekends free to work on my photography.” She relocated to Manchester (England) to focus on pushing her work forward.
I like objects, people and art that have an identity to them so I guess that I am inspired by those. People who tell you a bit about themselves via their work really inspire me a lot. Music, film and of course my surroundings too. My main drive is the need to improve and be more open about myself through my work. Those goals inspire me.” – Discover Elegia’s interview here

Sarah Elise Abramson lives “in a sea-foam-green house with my girlfriend, two kitties, and a leopard tortoise in San Pedro, California”.
In life and in the Polaroid series I recently finished called, “The Things That Live In The Middle” I noticed a few things. I’m attracted to the small size of the Polaroid itself. I aim to create images that are complex and intimate and leave you with a sense of magic that’s in every day life, if you’re open to it. It’s like when you look at a town or a city from an aerial view or an old, intricate dollhouse; each small space filled with it’s necessary components.” – Discover Sarah’s interview here

On the blog, we have presented many projects done by women through the series 8 exposures or Viewfinder, in which we chronicle interesting projects done using Impossible film.

Lili plasticienne shared her collage techniques with us. “I use different techniques in the medium of collage. My work is linked to movie themes in a passionate choice of the 50’s, serie noire and echoes the creative heritage of surrealism. (…) My plastic work consists in combining at the same time the emulsion, the collage and the graphics.” – Discover Lili’s creations here

Brigitte Bloom grew up in the desert, but likes to move around. The only polaroid camera she uses is a spectra – “such a dreamy camera!” Why does she likes instant photography? “it’s like holding magic. i honestly love everything about it. i like the mystery of not knowing how it will turn out. every photo is like a treasure to me. one of my favorite things is giving them away. somehow it feels more special than a regular photograph because it can’t be reproduced. so when i give someone one of my polaroids, it’s really giving them an original piece of art.” – Discover Brigitte’s photos here

No. 906

8 Exposures...with J Caldwell

Patrick Tobin, | 1020 days ago

Welcome back to 8 Exposures, our popular instant film Q&A series! This week, we are pleased to bring you our good friend and excellent photographer J Caldwell

1) What kind of Polaroid camera(s) do you use?

Way too many: Land Camera Automatic 100 and 250, Mamiya Universal, Spectra AF, Spectra ProCam, Spectra Onyx, Spectra 2, Macro 5 SLR for exactly two shots before it died, Minolta Instant Pro, SX-70 Alpha 1, SX-70 Model 2, SX-70 Sonar OneStep, Pronto!, TimeZero OneStep, SLR 680, Job Pro, One600 classic, and, recently for the Snap It See It 600 on a 600 project the OneStep 600 Flash. I am missing some, I’m sure.

2) Why do you like instant photography?

That’s like asking why I like cats. The answer is the same for both: they are amazing and there’s nothing else like them on earth.

3) What is your earliest memory of instant film?

I can’t bring myself to ask the shopkeeper in my brain to go rummaging through dusty and ill-formed memories from when I was a kid and had a magical Polaroid camera, though I know it was something like that. Rather I’ll jump forward to the renaissance, when TIP put out their first flush film. I bought a few packs at the NYC store and snapped outside the Guggenheim. I haven’t stopped since then.

4) What’s your favorite Impossible film type?

Without a doubt, PZ 680. It seems that the Polaroid Spectra camera is the unsung hero of instant film and that’s hard for me to understand since it is essentially the most versatile of all the integral print cameras: timer, multiple exposures, lighten/darken control, close-up lens, special effects lens kit. Couple all of that with the fact that PZ 680 has rich, unique colors and the less-iconic wide format.

5) What are your favorite subjects to photograph?

Emotions.

6) Tell us about a project you’re working on.

I obviously shoot a lot of portraits, so that’s an on-going project. Other than that, I’ve recently taken part in Chocolate Day, a celebration of Polaroid Type 100 Chocolate film that arose from a twitter conversation with TIP, Snap It See It and a few others.

I run a DIY magazine called fixation. We focus on portraiture with film and instant. The forthcoming issue (#9/the start of year three) will only feature images taken on Impossible films. No exceptions, not even polaroid.
Finally, inspired by an audio concept of Alvin Lucier’s “I am sitting in a room”, I am going to use a combination of iphone and Instant Lab to see how many iterations it takes to make a photo unrecognizable.

7) Who are your favorite photographers, instant or otherwise?

I recently saw the Polaroid Brotherhood, Crossroads & Etc #2 by Lyle Ashton Harris and checked out his other work. His Chocolate Polaroid front/back portrait series is amazing.

8) If you could take a photo of anyone or anything what would it be?

You know that photo of astronaut Bruce McCandless II floating in space with the earth behind him? I’d be cool with doing something like that with my Spectra AF. Shoot a bunch of PZ 680 and leave a few floating out there, bring the rest down to earth.

About J

I am a North Carolina based photographer specializing in emotional portraiture.

Thank you to J for taking part in 8 Exposures! To see more of his work, please visit his Facebook page and his Tumblr. You can also follow him on Instagram and Twitter.

No. 884

8 Exposures...with Brigitte Bloom.

Patrick Tobin, | 1062 days ago

Brigitte Bloom

Welcome back to 8 Exposures, our popular instant photography Q&A series! This week, we are happy to bring you photographer Brigitte Bloom

1) What kind of Polaroid camera(s) do you use?

the only polaroid camera i use is a spectra – such a dreamy camera! i also have a polaroid land camera 350 that i want to use more but the film i have for it is so old it comes out all gooey.

2) Why do you like instant photography?

it’s like holding magic. i honestly love everything about it. i like the mystery of not knowing how it will turn out. every photo is like a treasure to me. one of my favorite things is giving them away. somehow it feels more special than a regular photograph because it can’t be reproduced. so when i give someone one of my polaroids, it’s really giving them an original piece of art.

3) What is your earliest memory of instant film?

i remember the first time i found an old polaroid camera in our garage somewhere when i was about 7 or 8. it still had a couple pictures left in the camera and i was so excited i wanted to use it right away. so i lined up all my trolls on the kitchen table and took my first polaroid. i just found it recently which brought me back to this memory :)

4) What’s your favorite Impossible film type?

so far i’ve only used the color shade and silver shade. i love them both for different reasons. i do a lot of experimental work on the color film. with the black and white film i’ve had so much fun panting on them and creating these dreamworlds – while i’m in the process i get to see the photos really come to life!

5) What are your favorite subjects to photograph?

i do a lot of self portraits, mostly, because i’m always around :). nature is always a part of my photos, and animals.

6) Tell us about a project you’re working on.

i always have a million projects that i keep ideas for in my notebook. i’ve been doing a lot of collaborations this year which has been incredibly fun and gets me so inspired! for the first time in awhile, i have to say i don’t have a set project (photography related) at the moment. which is kind of nice, i feel like i’m starting fresh. i’m just living and ready to pick up the ideas whenever they come.

7) Who are your favorite photographers, instant or otherwise?

one of my favorite photographers is harley weir. in her earlier work she did a lot of polaroids and they just speak to me. it’s hard to describe in words but her photos take me to another place – i’m always in awe of her work! another photographer who will always be one of my favorites is sally mann. i could look through her books for hours, they fill me with inspiration!

8) If you could take a photo of anyone or anything what would it be?

my future children :).

About Brigitte

i grew up in the desert, but i like to move around. right now i’m training to get my certification as a yoga teacher :)

Thanks to Brigitte for taking part in 8 Exposures! To see more of her photography, please visit her Flickr photostream and follow her on Instagram.

No. 879

8 Exposures...with Lucas Orozco

Patrick Tobin, | 1069 days ago

Welcome back to 8 Exposures, our popular instant photography Q&A series! This week, we are happy to bring you Madrid-based photographer Lucas Orozco

1) What kind of Polaroid camera(s) do you use?

I primarily use to shoot a beautiful black SX-70, which has a foldable design and dreamy lens that still amaze me. I also use a Supercolor 635 CL, a Spectra System and for packfilm, the body of a 440 Land Camera equipped with the Copal shutter of a GelCam, which intricate focusing is a little obstacle to beat but in the end very gratifying.

2) Why do you like instant photography?

The physical actions through which you can “torture” the photo have total relevance in the decision of using instant film, as well as the possibilities of an unconscious subrogation that flood the “instant brand” in a unknowingly way; I mean, probably everyone has powerful remembrances framed in white squares, which subtly, distort the meaning of every other Polaroid into a very personal experience.

Instant film is not just a way to reproduce with a “special look” your pictures, it’s not a filter to apply on your perfectly, easily taken, iPhone snapshots. If instant film had been so simple, it wouldn’t have left a mark on millions of artists who worked with it, squeezing its possibilities and peculiarities until its limits, it goes far beyond; the process that constructs the photo is in my opinion, the foundation of the photograph itself, it generates obstacles to surpass, new solutions to find. The limitations stimulate the creation, the iPhone… just cool reproductions.

3) What is your earliest memory of instant film?

The strongest memory I have is a chapter of a children horror series called “Goosebumps”, where a boy, on a trip to Egypt with his uncle, started to take photos of the hieroglyphics with a Spectra camera. I can recall how magical it was for me to see the image appearing out of nowhere… I also remember discovering a few white framed tiny photos from the nineties in my grandma’s house then, recently, I realized they were taken with the old Supercolor camera my uncle gave to me years ago.

4) What’s your favorite Impossible film type?

In the first days of testing, I’m always thinking the new film I’m using is by far the best one created by Impossible, but as the months go by, I start to appreciate with a little of nostalgia the singularities of the now-outdated older films. But anyways: The PX 680 beta test film was the first one that caught my eye, in those moments, the color saturation and image definition were a huge improvement, so it was such a really deep breath of hope for the instant film history, that I couldn’t repress the impulse to title the first picture I took as “A Hope for Color”. It was a dream.

Early PX 600 films were also tricky, but after a few wasted shots, those warms shades were on another level; they were as magical as the first PX 70 FF, blue, blue and blue, ethereal blues.

And of course the Color Protection films, with the exciting new darker blue developing paste, are the best film in terms of definition, saturation and reliability, but I would never be tired of receiving newsletters of new test films, it’s so exciting, I can’t wait to be able to use the new 8×10 films!

5) What are your favorite subjects to photograph?

Bodies, people’s body details. I’m amazed with the strength with what the human body is capable of magnetize me.

6) Tell us about a project you’re working on.

I’m working on a series called “X.” where the Polaroid cameras are used as a physical tool to capture a crime scene. It’s related to what I’ve talked about before: the metadata of the “white square frame case”. It is fascinating how deeply we have installed some concealed information that appears unwittingly. The Polaroid camera has been a tool since its birth, being just a utensil used in a very mechanical procedure, whether for its simplicity or because the instant product, an advantage that digital photography has consumed. So it just has the duty of generating an “instant reality”. We already know Polaroid cameras were easily found at every police station; What if they represent more than just reality? Is reality capable of being misled? Can we cheat reality? So is “X.” truly pure photography? I mean, nothing is real, and if we accept those Polaroids photos as evidence, are we accomplices of those falsified crime scenes?

7) Who are your favorite photographers, instant or otherwise?

I truly admire the work of different artists, but especially the dirty, blurry emotional work of Mark Morrisroe, he meticulously has ordered the chaos, it is spontaneous but very well cared. In contrast I also like the productions of Mapplethorpe, where the flowers are organs, and the bodies are marble and ebony surfaces to lick.
Rauschenberg prints have this powerful blurred grainy aspect I loved, as well as the Miroslav Tichý crude black and white abducted portraits. Finally, nowadays I’m obsessed with the Hiroshi Sugimoto white burn retinas, such a master!

8) If you could take a photo of anyone or anything what would it be?

A detail of the healed scar of Marina Abramović’s abdomen, or the landscape of a shattered plane in a Icelandic plain; always on PQ 8×10.

About Lucas

I’m a 20-year-old Fine Arts student from Madrid. I’ve been shooting instant film for years, trying as many new films and cameras as I can.

Thanks to Lucas for taking part in 8 Exposures! To see more of his photography, please visit his Flickr photostream. You can also follow him on Twitter at @njosnavelin4.

No. 869

8 Exposures...with Marcelo Yanez

Patrick Tobin, | 1083 days ago

Welcome back to 8 Exposures, our popular instant photography Q&A series! This week, we are happy to bring you North Carolina-based student and photographer Marcelo Yanez

1) What kind of Polaroid camera(s) do you use?

I use both integral and pack film, but I mostly stick to integral in my SX-70 Model 1, SX-70 Sonar, SX-70 Alpha 1, and SLR 680 SE.

2) Why do you like instant photography?

There is something very friendly and welcoming about the whole format — in spite of the non-welcoming work required to get good results those first few times. However, I didn’t have this mentality of instant being welcoming when I first started shooting. Initially, I was more interested in playing with the beautiful folding SLRs and getting the special look provided by the film. It wasn’t until I started my Stranger Project that I began to notice the friendly and fun aspect of the whole format. When you show people the images taken with the camera, and even when you take the camera out to take a picture, a smile always creeps onto the person’s face. It’s something about the nostalgia or the look of the format. I love seeing this reaction when I take pictures. Not only does it transfer onto the film, but I get a real pleasure over handling the camera, waiting for the film to develop, and then uploading it to Flickr. Shooting instant film isn’t only about what I’ve mentioned above, but also about the community. The whole world that has built around your film leaves me speechless every time I think about it. Everyone wants to meet each other and look at each-other’s work. It sounds simple when stated that way, but it’s really something special which you won’t find with any other format.

3) What is your earliest memory of instant film?

Although I don’t remember the very earliest of days, I have images as proof that I was exposed onto instant film with a Spectra AF the very day of my birth! When I was six or so I started to get into photography, and I vividly remember my 600 Taz camera. However, beyond that, I don’t remember much.

4) What’s your favorite Impossible film type?

PX 100 UV+ if I had to choose any one film. I’m not too crazy about the 600 films in comparison to the SX-70 films.

5) What are your favorite subjects to photograph?

I photograph most things that catch my eye, but with instant film I love to take pictures of people — mostly people off the street. It’s always a thrill to approach someone, and ask for their picture. The cameras are wonderful conversation pieces, and I love taking advantage of those characteristics. I often end up having a conversation with the subject, and sometimes even connect online or share stories. All this in hopes that some day I’ll meet some character out of a Joseph Mitchell NYC story ;)

6) Tell us about a project you’re working on.

I’m not a professional or aspiring professional photographer, but simply a high school student having fun with an instant camera so I don’t have any formal “projects” per se. However, this year I’m taking an AP Studio Art class at school, and I’m making Polaroid/instant imagery my portfolio concentration — meaning at least twelve images of the total twenty-four will be shot on some form of instant medium. I’m hoping I can break the prejudice that exists with instant film, and show the potential and variety instant film provides by having manipulations, transparencies, emulsion lifts, etc in my portfolio. With my concentration, I’m getting into manipulations and really pushing Impossible film to its limits in attempt to create a group of images someone would only be able to do with a Polaroid camera. Anything I’ll be up to will be on my Flickr page or Twitter. I’m still constructing a website which should be up soon and that will feature my stranger portraits and expanded musings on the images and my travels.

7) Who are your favorite photographers, instant or otherwise?

There are a few deceased photographers I admire like Andre Kertesz, David Wojnarowicz (his Rimbaud photographs), and Cartier-Bresson. I don’t follow much current professional photography, but I’m a great admirer of Philip-Lorca diCorcia and Pari Dukovic — both of their portrait work is near flawless. If I had to pick ONE person, then Philip-Lorca diCorcia.
From our own community my mentor has always been Leslie Lazenby (Utchat on Flickr). Her talent and knowledge of instant film and photography is unrivaled. I probably wouldn’t have gone back to instant film if it wasn’t for people like her, Michael Raso, and the rest of the Film Photography Podcast — our whole community owes a lot to them for bringing so many people into the format. I also greatly admire the work of Toby Hancock, Ben Innocent, Andrew Bartram, Andrew Millar, Meredith Wilson and Brian Henry — practically that whole crowd of British Polaroiders blow my mind image after image. I think the first work I ever saw with Impossible that really impacted me was Brian Henry’s. His work is one of a kind! There is one other photographer, a Canadian Polaroider, Jon Estwards. I recently discovered his work through Brian Henry, and it has left me speechless. Every image is so beautifully hypnotic and stunning!

8) If you could take a photo of anyone or anything what would it be?

Wow, you guys really leave the hard questions for last! Probably Kurt Vonnegut or Gary Gygax. I owe so much to those two men. I’m not sure how great of photographic subjects they would be, but simply to be in their presence would be a dream.

About Marcelo

I’m from San Juan, Puerto Rico, but I’m currently living in Charlotte, NC. I’m a rising senior at Providence Day School and an aspiring Manhattanite, philosopher, and art curator.

Thanks to Marcelo for taking part in 8 Exposures! To see more of his photography, please visit his Flickr photostream.

No. 857

8 Exposures...with Scott St. Pierre

Patrick Tobin, | 1097 days ago

Welcome back to 8 Exposures, our popular instant photography Q&A series! This week, we are happy to bring you California-based photographer Scott St. Pierre

1) What kind of Polaroid camera(s) do you use?

I have 6 folding SX-70s in various stages of decay. The one I’m most fearful of finally dying is one I bought broken on Craigslist and fixed myself. Developer or battery acid had seized up the back gears near the film counter, corrosion on the copper disk that sits just under red rubber shutter button prevented it from shooting, and of course the focus ring was unmovable. Almost every new film pack I open up is a decision of which camera to shoot on. Do I go with the decaying yet reliable, the cool black/tan blue button Model 2 that has to be closed after every shot or the next one won’t eject correctly, or the mint condition one that has no working flash socket? Bleh. I also have a Pronto Sonar OneStep that I’m dying to shoot on, but don’t want to give up the control I have with my SLRs. I love shooting my Big Shot, my folding 100 & 440 and my ColorPack II. I just bought a pack of black-frame PZ-690 for my Spectra ProCam and lastly, I have four 600 cameras, but the only one I like to use is my Sun 660. It was my grand-mothers and it’s highly possible that it is the first Polaroid camera I ever came into physical contact with.

2) Why do you like instant photography?

I play guitar because I like the sounds I can make on the instrument. Different sounds require different guitars, different amps, different effect pedals. The same goes for shooting on Polaroids with Impossible film. What is absolutely great is that the film continues veering in the direction of exactly what I’m looking for. Guitar analogies aside, I think I like it because it’s a medium you sort of have to wrestle with. Sure, most times I can get a more “perfect” shot on my iPhone, but it means so much more getting it right with a Polaroid camera. You can get to the top of Everest a lot easier taking an elevator, but if you want your name in the history books, you climb that bitch. Also, I’m not putting down iPhone photography, there are some brilliant shots being done with them, and as they say the best camera is the one you have with you, so I always have it with me, but honestly most iPhone shots I find myself saying, “I wish I had my SX-70 for this,” and never once have I been shooting with a Polaroid and said, “Meh, this would look cooler from my iPhone.” Also, last April (2012) I saw Grant Hamilton’s Time Zero the movie at its premiere in MA. When it gets a full release or video I encourage everyone to see it. It’ll set your instant heart on fire.

3) What is your earliest memory of instant film?

I was born in the late 70s so I’m sure someone around me was shooting off a rainbow OneStep while ABBA played off in the background somewhere. But the one memory I can easily recall the clearest is my dad giving me the Kodak instant camera we had and saying I could do anything I want with it, (which translated to: you can take it apart,) and that Kodak couldn’t make film for it anymore. At the time I was most impressed with the crazy shaped battery it took.

4) What’s your favorite Impossible film type?

If I had to pick a favorite that absolutely never let me down in terms of performance and the shot coming out exactly how I thought it would, I’d say PX 100. I think PX 100 is me happy living in a small town and PX 70 is shooting for the moon. That being said, When I remember to set the wheel a bit to darken the new PX 70/PX 680 Color Protection is a monster favorite. It amazes me what Impossible chemists have been able to do with the film in only a few short years.

5) What are your favorite subjects to photograph?

Los Angeles in general is just an amazing place to be able to shoot from. When I have the resources there are a lot of great shots I want to take. My son is pretty funny to shoot, and I don’t think the pictures come out in a way that strikes people as “Gawd, this guy takes too many pics of his kid.” I’m the first to notice how many bad kid photos there are out there in the world. I feel like telling some people, “Look, just because you have a camera doesn’t mean you have to use it.” I know how terrible a thing that is, but I’m from New England, we do sarcasm…like, a lot. Anyone reading this, I hold you above the average Facebook kid-picture poster. Keep shooting, don’t let the short bald guy tell you what not to do! I’m a product photographer by day, so I try to keep away from stale shots of things that I’m forced to do with my other work, which I guess is another comment I could add to question 2, but I’ll just keep it here. I love shooting analog instant film because it has nothing to do with my day job of shooting ultra-clean photoshopped to death product shots.

6) Tell us about a project you’re working on.

I have this one idea that would be a big undertaking, and I don’t want to talk about it because the writer side of me (I also write fiction) doesn’t like talking about unfinished things, but I can tell you about a project idea that I recently had to throw away. When Hostess announced they were going out of business and twinkies were going for big money on ebay, I scored two big boxes from my mom’s house and i grabbed them knowing I was moving to Los Angeles this year, and my plan was in like 5 – 10 years when all the twinkies in all the world were gone, except for my two boxes, I was going to do a shoot of celebrities eating twinkies with expensive champagnes or whatever. Sort of a joke like “We’re better than you average people because we still got twinkies up in this bitch. Being rich rules.”

7) Who are your favorite photographers, instant or otherwise?

So so many. The instant film community is amazing and encouraging. While I was working in the comic industry I would find that the more I got to know an artist the more my view changed on their particular work and that eye to heart connection has definitely carried through for me into my instant film journey. Toby Hancock’s work stands out to me as someone whose work I was immediately impressed with even before I met him, and he’s been great to tweet with and hang out with here in Los Angeles. We share that whole “stranger in a strange land” thing but I’m new here and he’s been here since the 20’s or 30’s I think. Ryan, Dylan, Justin, Kim, Sarah…I could just keep typing names and it seems like every week there’s someone whose work I wasn’t aware of before and I end up having a new favorite. Everyone who joins the community seems to have something fresh. At the last L.A. Polawalk I attended there was a guy shooting his first pack of TIP film, PX-100 I believe, on a borrowed camera and BLAMMO he had some impressive shots. Some big names photos I’ve always liked are Terry Richardson Mark Seliger, Brantley Gutierrez. Also my picture for this blog installment was shot by my 4 year old. I don’t think I smile as wide for any other reason than when he’s shooting me.

8) If you could take a photo of anyone or anything what would it be?

I’d like to take a picture of the last bullet on the planet to ever roll off an assembly line. It’s been a few minutes since I wrote that last line now and I decided that while it sounds utopian at first it probably only means that someone in the future has created a far more efficient way for our species to rub each other out.

About Scott

I was born north of Boston. I’m 36 and just moved from there to Redondo Beach, Los Angeles, CA. Currently I’m a photographer/graphics specialist for an electronics parts manufacturer in New Jersey. I work from home. It gets lonely. Very happy to say I’m slowly getting my people skills back since moving here and that it’s starting to feel much less awkward talking to people out in public. Today I surprise high-fived a complete stranger who was just holding his hand up trying to get his wife’s attention from across the way.

Thanks to Scott for taking part in 8 Exposures! To see more of his photography visit his Flickr photostream and his Instagram. You can also follow him on Twitter at @scottstpierre.

No. 853

8 Exposures...with Horace Trovato

Patrick Tobin, | 1104 days ago

Welcome back to 8 Exposures, our popular instant photography Q&A series! This week, we are happy to bring you Maryland-based photographer Horace Trovato

1) What kind of Polaroid camera(s) do you use?

I use a Sonar SX-70. I had never seen one before until a friend in college picked one up. I remember sitting in his apartment trying to figure out what it was, I couldn’t figure out how to open it.

2) Why do you like instant photography?

I like instant photography for the same reason I like film photography or even digital photos that are actually taken the whole way and turned into prints. Frankly it’s magic to be able to capture a real moment and have it. Have you ever looked at a photograph until you didn’t understand it? Like saying a word over and over and over again until it’s new and strange. It’s easy for me to take photography for granted but holding a print in my hands helps me recognize the wonder of it again. I love getting the print from the Polaroid and also knowing that there is no editing or selection later makes me take the moment of capture more solemnly.

A friend of mine was describing the “lover’s eye” people get when they step out of the darkroom into the light and get to see their printed photograph for the first time. It’s the same feeling waiting to turn your Impossible film over. There’s no telling what could have gone wrong or right. Once you flip it over and it turns out right it’s a wave of joy.

Those moments – right before you take the picture and right before you look at it are anxious – and hopefully rewarding – moments.

3) What is your earliest memory of instant film?

I saw my first instant film at a friend’s birthday party. They had leaned a basketball hoop over and were taking photos of us with the Polaroid camera tilted so it looked like we were all dunking. We all got one. I didn’t understand why my Dad would choose to shoot film he had to get developed when such a thing existed. I was like ‘you get the print right away!!’. It was so cool.

4) What’s your favorite Impossible film type?

It was the PX 100 Silver Shade Cool until I got the PX Shade. Get the PX Shade. It makes a huge difference. Now I like the PX-70 Color Protection. The colors are really sensitive to light but with the shade they turn out really nice. They don’t seem to handle contrast well and I often get yellow blues but with even lighting the color tones are gorgeous.

5) What are your favorite subjects to photograph?

When I got my first pack of IP film I really wanted to make it count. I decided I wanted to use it on a single subject, and kind of do a study on that subject. So it needed to be something that was worth getting 8 photos of but also it needed to be something I could keep coming back to so I wasn’t rushing through a pack. And then I thought, my wife! She’s always here, she’s got so many layers, and she’s beautiful. So that’s what I did with my first pack.

We go on little trips sometimes and I like to take landscapes. Anything that reminds me of how wonderful creation is. Or my wife, haha.

6) Tell us about a project you’re working on.

I’ve been captivated by this idea that, while there is an artfulness to photography, it is more of a storytelling medium than an art medium. Or that, as you’re making art with photography, your art, your craft is more similar to a novelist than to a painter. We look through a photograph at the subject in much the same way that we do a novel, while in a painting the artist is forefront, he stands between you and the subject.

A photographer is more like the foundry than the sculptor. God is the sculptor and he made a beautiful world – now you have the opportunity to cast that world into a photograph. The photographer also chooses what he wants to cast. So he curates what he’s been given and then casts it.

So a project I’d like to do is to take one of the beautiful locations near my home and really study it and photograph it over time to get a good idea of what curating, casting and storytelling looks like in photography.

7) Who are your favorite photographers, instant or otherwise?

Michael Kenna, Michael Smith and Paula Chamlee – mainly for what they do with black and white. I really like Bryan Shutmaat’s series Grays the Mountain Sends and Richard Barnes’ series Animal Logic. Also Caleb Charland for his ever creative how-does-stuff-work approach to photography.

8) If you could take a photo of anyone or anything what would it be?

My wife or whales. My wife and whales.

About Horace

I live in Maryland with my family. My wife and I both take lots of photos and we turned an old outhouse into a darkroom. I love going on adventures with my wife and son.

Thanks to Horace for taking part in 8 Exposures! To see more of his photography visit his Instagram. You can also follow him on Twitter at @hjtrovato.

No. 850

8 Exposures...with Margot Gabel

Patrick Tobin, | 1111 days ago

Welcome back to 8 Exposures, our popular instant photography Q&A series! This week, we are happy to bring you French photographer Margot Gabel

1) What kind of Polaroid camera(s) do you use?

I use a common Polaroid Supercolor 645, it’s a cheap camera but I’m quite satisfied even if I secretly dream of a beautiful SX-70… I use a Fuji Instax Wide too because it’s a very nice format! I also have a Polaroid Colorpack II, a huge piece of plastic. I will test it soon with some black and white film!

2) Why do you like instant photography?

I’m fascinated by 35mm film & even more by instant films. In my childhood I loved watching the images appear on the little white square, I thought it was magic! I found this sensation learning to develop by hand in darkroom. But the handling is tedious. There is not this incredible instantaneous quality with 35mm film.

3) What is your earliest memory of instant film?

I think it was in front of the Christmas tree. We put our Dalmatian in front of my two sisters and me. It was very kitsch. We were dressed in Christmas colors, looking like candy canes and red and green flakes.

4) What’s your favorite Impossible film type?

I have only tested the color versions, but the one that makes me dream is PX 600 Black Frame

5) What are your favorite subjects to photograph?

I think more about what I’m shooting with my Polaroid than with my Canon AE1. I compose and locate places a long before pressing the shutter button! So I like to make absurd “mise en scène” with my friends in intriguing places..

6) Tell us about a project you’re working on.

This summer I want to experiment with some strange ways to develop film using red wine, citrus, acid.. I would like to see the limits of the film, playing with temperatures and mistreating pictures to cause colored reactions!

7) Who are your favorite photographers, instant or otherwise?

Tamara Lichtenstein, Baohien Ngo and Davis Ayer are using 35, 120 film and instant perfectly.. It’s mostly for fashion shootings but it’s always beautiful! I like them because they don’t manipulate their pictures digitally, they are using the films naturally to make outstanding images.

8) If you could take a photo of anyone or anything what would it be?

Dinosaurs, of course!

About Margot

I’m 21 years old. I live in Paris at the moment, and I just finished my degree in graphic design at Gobelins school! I’ve been shooting film since I was 14 years old. I started by developing black and white films and now I try as many films, formats and cameras as I can!

Thank you to Margot for taking part in 8 Exposures! To see more of her photos, please visit her Tumblr and her Facebook photo page. You can also follow her on Twitter at MRGT_.

No. 847

8 Exposures...with James Eakins

Patrick Tobin, | 1118 days ago

Welcome back to 8 Exposures, our popular instant photography Q&A series! This week, we are happy to bring you California-based photographer James Eakins.

1) What kind of Polaroid camera(s) do you use?

SLR 680, original SX-70, Land 450, Crown Graphic with a 4×5 Polaroid back and there is my newest obsession a Sinar P with a Polaroid 81-06 holder.

2) Why do you like instant photography?

Every instant camera is unique and leaves its own fingerprint on each frame, I love the breath you take before firing the shutter and the sound of the motor as it ejects. There is also something special about going on this journey with Impossible, trying each batch as it comes out and discovering its specific quirks and qualities.

3) What is your earliest memory of instant film?

My grandfather had a Sun 660 he would take shots of the family with whenever we would visit, I thought it was the coolest thing around.

4) What’s your favorite Impossible film type?

My favorite is PX 680.

5) What are your favorite subjects to photograph?

I’m a sucker for a building with a cloudy sky backdrop.

6) Tell us about a project you’re working on.

I collaborated on an 8×10 project this month with Jessica Reinhardt (whose photography I love and highly recommend everyone go check out), she and I will be collaborating more over the next few months. Shooting 8×10 Impossible was an incredible experience and am looking forward to the next steps we take with it.

7) Who are your favorite photographers, instant or otherwise?

Degas’ photo work has always been a heavy influence, it’s what made me want to pick up a camera. My favorite modern photographers are Penny Felts, Jon Anthøny Syverson, Toby Hancock, Michael Magoski and Mat Marash

8) If you could take a photo of anyone or anything what would it be?

I’d hop in the time machine, grab Edgar Degas and Charles Chaplin for a photo shoot on Hollywood Blvd circa 1940.

About James

Musician/photographer from Orange County, California.

Thanks to James for taking part in 8 Exposures! To see more of his photography visit dreaminginfilm.com and his Flickr photostream. You can also hear his music at broaddaylight.cc and follow him on Twitter at @broaddaylight.

No. 844

8 Exposures...with Ernesto Eisner

Patrick Tobin, | 1125 days ago

Welcome back to 8 Exposures, our popular instant photography Q&A series! This week, we are happy to bring you Brooklyn-based photographer Ernesto Eisner

1) What kind of Polaroid camera(s) do you use?

I use the classic SX-70 Sonar Land Camera, the 360 Land Camera with a Rodenstock-Ysarex 1:4,7 f=127mm lens and the Automatic 100 Polaroid Land Camera.

2) Why do you like instant photography?

I like instant photography because it’s quick. I also like the sensation of not having total control of the colors. I also like the nostalgic connotation of the film.

3) What is your earliest memory of instant film?

One of my earliest memories about instant film is the sound of the 600 film coming out of the camera.

4) What’s your favorite IMPOSSIBLE film type?

I have tried almost all the IMPOSSIBLE films, but my favorites are the PX 680 Gold Edition and the PX 100 Silver Shade films.

5) What are your favorite subjects to photograph?

My favorite subjects are street photography, portraits, architecture and abstract photography.

6) Tell us about a project you’re working on.

I am currently working on a project named “Your Friend”. In this series I photograph people in the city that I don’t know and that I find peculiar.

7) Who are your favorite photographers, instant or otherwise?

My favorite photographer are Brassaï, Doisneau, Eugéne Atget, Kertész, Chemamadoz, Araki, Peter Witkin, Helmut Newton, Sally Mann, Diane Arbus, Robert Mapplethorpe, Ansel Adams and many others.

8) If you could take a photo of anyone or anything what would it be?

I would like to capture smell and sound in my photographs.

About Ernesto

I was born in Buenos Aires, Argentina 33 years ago. Based in Brooklyn, I am currently working on various photographic projects. I have always been a fan of Polaroid and now of The Impossible Project Films.

Thank you to Ernesto for taking part in 8 Exposures! To see more of his work, please visit his Tumblr at ernestoeisner.tumblr.com/.

No. 829

8 Exposures...with Bruce Breuer

Patrick Tobin, | 1160 days ago

Welcome back to 8 Exposures, our popular instant film Q&A series! This week, we’re happy to present to you New Jersey photographer Bruce Breuer

1) What kind of Polaroid camera(s) do you use?

I use an SX-70 Sonar and I recently got my hands on a Spectra AF, have not had the time to use it yet.

2) Why do you like instant photography?

I like it not only because I am a classical kind of guy, but because it gives me a feeling I have never obtained from anything else. The thought of my next shot keeps me going, it gets me through my roughest days, and I thank The Impossible Project and instant photography for that.

3) What is your earliest memory of instant film?

My earliest memory has to be my first day of kindergarten when my father took a photo of me all dressed up for school. It has been in my life since I can remember, always catching those lovely moments between me and my family. My first Camera was an original 600 given to me by my father, I still think about all those first day of school shots taken with that beauty!

4) What’s your favorite IMPOSSIBLE film type?

PX 70 Color Protection for sure.

5) What are your favorite subjects to photograph?

Flowers and my girlfriend, Autumn. Floral photography is delightful and she is a painter with a wonderful creative view so it is always great working with her.

6) Tell us about a project you’re working on.

I was working on a manipulation project but i just got ahold of a Spectra AF so I am thinking about doing a double exposure portrait project.

7) Who are your favorite photographers, instant or otherwise?

Adam Goldberg, Raymond Molinar, And Toby Hancock.

8) If you could take a photo of anyone or anything what would it be?

The Northern Lights.

About Bruce

I am from Kearny, a small town in NJ. I spend most of my time sketching, taking long walks, attempting DIY projects, and shooting with my lovely SX-70.

Thanks to Bruce for taking part in 8 Exposures! To see more of his photography, please visit his Flickr photostream.

No. 819

8 Exposures...with Thomas Boesgaard

Patrick Tobin, | 1174 days ago

Hello friends, and welcome back to 8 Exposures, our popular instant film Q&A series. This week, we are happy bring you Danish photographer Thomas Boesgaard

1) What kind of Polaroid camera(s) do you use?

I end up using my SLR 680s and my Land Camera 340 quite a lot, because they are portable and quick to use. Apart from those two, I also use a 600 SE, a Land Camera 190, various SX-70s and a beautiful Polaroid 1000. Also, I use the Polaroid back for my Mamiya RZ67 quite a lot.

2) Why do you like instant photography?

The whole process feels organic, more human. And you end up with a physical product. When on vacation, I just love to flip through my growing stack of polaroids every day.

3) What is your earliest memory of instant film?

Wanting one of the plastic 600-series cameras as a boy, and being reminded that I could never afford to buy film. So it was fast forward to 2006, when it all started, and I began with a Polaroid 635 CL, and then I learned about the existence of the SX-70, then the existence of the 600 SE…it never stops.

4) What’s your favorite IMPOSSIBLE film type?

PX 600 Black Frame, and PX 100. I have only tried four packs of the new Color Protection film. They are almost too perfect.

5) What are your favorite subjects to photograph?

I end up photographing my Sunday breakfast a lot. Next thing would be my girlfriend. And then all the subjects I pass, which just seem to fit no other medium but the the classic Polaroid.

6) Tell us about a project you’re working on.

Two events have happened recently, that will be my new project. November 2012, my son was born. Unfortunately my wife got very sick shortly after giving birth, which resulted in a brain-bleeding, and resulting brain-damage. I’m gonna document my wife’s recovery.

But will still keep on photographing all those long sunday breakfasts.

7) Who are your favorite photographers, instant or otherwise?

Julius Schulman for architecture and Helmut Newton for portraits. Peter Beard for the more creative stuff. On Flickr I have Moominsean in my rss-feed, but also love the work of Grant Hamilton, SX70Manipulator, and my good friend Blanca Lanaspa.

8) If you could take a photo of anyone or anything what would it be?

My wife on a surfboard catching a perfect wave.

About Thomas

I’m from Copenhagen, Denmark, and work as an IT-consultant. Right now I’m taking a year’s parental leave.

Thank you so much to Thomas for taking part in 8 Exposures! To see more of his work, please visit his Flickr photostream. You can also visit his Tumblr and follow him on Twitter at @thomasboesgaard.

No. 817

8 Exposures...with Bjoern Menke

Patrick Tobin, | 1181 days ago

Welcome back to 8 Exposures, our popular instant film Q&A series! This week, we’re happy to present to you German photographer Bjoern Menke

1) What kind of Polaroid camera(s) do you use?

I began to shoot instant film with an ivory-colored SX-70 covered with brown leather and I love to use it on bright summer days. Quickly I recognized that slow SX-70 film often doesn’t give me the creative capabilities I need in low light situations so I’m also using an SLR 680. Beside these two cameras I sometimes use some 80s style box cameras for 600 film, a Spectra Pro Cam and a Polaroid 350 packfilm camera.

2) Why do you like instant photography?

Oh, difficult to describe and hard to say what of reason is most important for me. At first, I think it is the unique look of expired Polaroid film and IMPOSSIBLE film and the sometimes unpredictable results by which I’m really impressed. I’m also a very impatient person and I want to hold my developed analog photo in my hands immediately after taking it. That’s only possible with instant film. Also there is that special nostalgic feeling while shooting that kind of film, which reminds me of my beautiful childhood in the early 80s…

3) What is your earliest memory of instant film?

My grandpa took some instant photos of me and my family when I was a child. I was so fascinated by that magic camera and I spent many sleepless nights by asking myself why my grandpa’s cam spit out the photos immediately and my father’s Minolta XD7 didn’t.

4) What’s your favorite IMPOSSIBLE film type?

I love every sort of IMPOSSIBLE film I can get my hands on, but at the moment it’s PX 680 Color Protection film.

5) What are your favorite subjects to photograph?

I’m fascinated by shooting people, preferential girls cause in my opinion they have that kind of urge to be on a photo much more than boys. I also love to preserve architecture and objects from the 50s to the 80s on instant film.

6) Tell us about a project you’re working on.

At the moment I plan some kind of book containing instant photos of dull 70s suburban architecture. I also plan to shoot some instant photo series of fashionable boys.

7) Who are your favorite photographers, instant or otherwise?

I don’t have a favorite photographer, rather I love to browse all these fantastic blogs containing photos which were often shot by amateurs and self-taught photographers.

8) If you could take a photo of anyone or anything what would it be?

An old man, perhaps around 80 years old or more, in whose face you can read about his whole life.

About Bjoern

I’m a business man and photographer from Koln, Germany.

Thanks to Bjoern for taking part in 8 Exposures! To see more of his photography, please visit his Flickr photostream.

No. 814

8 Exposures...with Leandro Fornasir

Patrick Tobin, | 1188 days ago

Welcome back to 8 Exposures, our popular instant film Q&A series! This week we’re very happy to present you with Los Angeles video editor and photographer Leandro Fornasir

And of course, your answers to these questions:

1) What kind of Polaroid camera(s) do you use?

Primarily an SLR 680 with a wonky autofocus, a couple of SX-70 Sonar OneSteps and a Spectra AF. I also use a Auto 100 and 450 from time to time.

2) Why do you like instant photography?

I’ve always loved photography of all flavors, film and instant (digital too). I’m not a heavy shooter in general, so getting my photo right, for me, in a few shots or less tends to happen regardless of camera type analog or digital. I like it right away or I don’t and move on. For me, the instant medium matches how I tend to photograph, but I don’t have to wait till the end of the roll and I don’t need to spend much time in photoshop. Plus, in our very digital world, its nice to have a tactile, unique expression of a particular moment in your hands. It’s a bridge, in a way, between the digital immediacy and analog result. I like the unpredictability of certain films/cameras and letting go of some of the control and how all that can contribute to the final image. Also, there is a challenge to working with instant film that I enjoy, both in terms of cameras and film types. Trying to figure out the strength and weakness between cameras and instant variables like age, sun light and temperature. The image quality and color palettes are very much its own as well. I like that, at times, they can look painterly or modern and yet something vintage right out of an old print ad or invoking distant memories. I find the entire analog/chemistry/development process fascinating and exciting. Since its been a good 12+ years since the last time I was in a wet darkroom and watching a print develop, the instant process always brings back that thrill of seeing an image slowly appear.

3) What is your earliest memory of instant film?

Growing up we had a couple of Polaroid cameras. Mostly used for when family visited or birthdays and special events, but not to often. Some of those Polaroid images themselves are almost more memorable even though I haven’t seen them in many years, yet they are distinctive in my memories. I also very much remember being fascinated by the reflective gold sonar on our SX-70 Pronto and staring at my reflection through the grill. My sister swears there is a folding SX-70 some where in the house still. I don’t remember it, but I look for it every time I visit…

4) What’s your favorite IMPOSSIBLE film type?

I like so many of them! The PX 70 “12/11” batch was really great. I’ve tried the Cool film and was really impressed with the color and clarity and just the overall progression of the film. PX 600 Black Frame, PX 100 UV+ and of course the various specials like the Poor Pods. The black and white films in general have really been great, each version/generation offering something different, from gentle tones to the sepia fade to dark blacks and nice contrast. I just finished off some packs of PX600 Cool Silver Shade goodness. Such great progress. I think this is the black and white instant film I’ve been waiting for.

5) What are your favorite subjects to photograph?

Right now, a little bit of everything. I tend to lean towards portraits as well as body parts like hands and feet. Definitely food, objects/flowers and my dogs and some glimpses of my family/life. Plus those little imperfect scenes/moments that one runs across.

6) Tell us about a project you’re working on.

I started a instant 365 project several months ago. Taking a shot everyday for a year. I wanted to challenge myself, to create something new everyday (and trying to shoot only one a day) for better or worse. Also, to look for ideas and inspirations for jumping off points to create other series down the road. Plus, just to better myself and my skills. It has definitely been a challenge.

7) Who are your favorite photographers, instant or otherwise?

There are so many. I’m such a visual person that I’m bad with names. A few would be from some masters like Cartier-Bresson and Edward Weston, to some of the more contemporary artists that I studied while in college like Nan Goldin, the Starn Twins and Cindy Sherman. And of course the many, many great photographers and artists I’ve seen on Flickr over the years.

8) If you could take a photo of anyone or anything what would it be?

This is a tough one, what comes to mind though is more of a project/series then a single image. Going to Italy and visiting the regions that my family is from and documenting where I essentially came from (I’m 1st and 2nd generation) and the people/family I’ve never met. And of course the food!

About Leandro

I’m a video editor living in Los Angeles with my wife and two dogs.

Thanks very much to Leandro for taking part in 8 Exposures! To see more of his photography, please visit his Flickr photostream. You can also follow him on Twitter at @leandrofornasir.

No. 803

8 Exposures...with Jon Syverson

Patrick Tobin, | 1202 days ago

Hello everyone, and welcome back to 8 Exposures, our popular instant film Q&A series! This entry focuses on Wisconsin photographer Jon Syverson

1) What kind of Polaroid camera(s) do you­ use?

The most used in my collection would have to be the Polaroid Spectra SE and the Polaroid Land Camera 150.

*2) Why do you like instant photography???

It sometimes resembles a far away place, or another time, something other than the sterility of other forms of imaging.

Instant photography is of course one of the last truly magical things, I believe. I am still captivated and left in awe, quite frankly, of all of the different types and ages of instant films that are available for use to this day. I wish some of the oldest of the Polaroid films were still available, or that I could time travel, whatever.

I also really like instant photography because it requires you to have greater knowledge of film scanning, which was something I used to do for years on the job. Although, come to think of it, I had never attempted taping a Polaroid to a drum scanner.

3) What is your earliest memory of instant film?

My aunt had an older SX-70 camera that I remember at birthday parties and other family events, whenever the polaroid photography was about to happen I always remember being excited in advance just to wait…and watch the film develop. Always left feeling with a little bit of tingling up my spine, I would always step away shaking my head in wonderment.

4) What’s your favorite Impossible film type?

Loving these new Color Protection films, they’re just gorgeous every time. PZ 680 CP is probably my favorite.

5) What are your favorite subjects to photograph?

I enjoy photographing people, mostly women, with a focus on women’s fashion recently. I would like to get more into nature and incorporate more of an organic feeling into my imagery, maybe when spring arrives.

6) Tell us about a project you’re working on.

I do have an older project that I really wish I was still capable of working on, but due to the lack of usable older Polaroid Type 47 instant roll film, the project is now complete.

The Polaroid Type 47 Project is something I had been working on for a couple years now. I actually consider it a collection of photography that has happened almost miraculously considering the age of the film and how long it has been expired, almost impossible. I consider it a true testament to the durability of this Polaroid film. Most, if not all of the photography in this set is from film that was to be expired before 1973.??

It first began when a friend of mine, a very talented artist by the name of Jeremy Pettis, brought me a couple boxes of this film that he had found at a local market. I just so happened to be the only person who had a camera that the film would work in, an old Polaroid Electric Eye 900, and so it began with some experimentation. I had started to gather some of the film online, but all of it had really turned into a gamble of sorts, because over 90% of this film that I had started to purchase simply did not work. The rest is history!

7) Who are your favorite photographers, instant or otherwise?

Heiner Luepke, Bastian Julia, Peter McCabe, Leanne Surfleet, Philippe Bourgoin, François-Xavier Laurent, Joep Gottemaker, Andrew Millar, Jessica Kaminski, Erik Ljung, Brian Zbichorski, Jessica Monte, Aubrey Rose Aragon, Nick Leonard, Khánh Hmoong, Man Ray.

8) If you could take a photo of anyone or anything what would it be?

Audrey Hepburn <3

Thanks to Jon for taking part in 8 Exposures! To see more of his photography, please visit his Flickr photostream.

No. 797

8 Exposures...with Hilary Clarke

Patrick Tobin, | 1209 days ago

Welcome back to 8 Exposures, our popular instant film Q&A series! This week, we’re happy to bring you British writer and photographer Hilary Clarke

1) What kind of Polaroid camera(s) do you use?

The first camera I bought was a 600, which I still love as it’s so easy to use and takes fantastic images. I’ve also got a Spectra and a folding SX-70 sonar which is fast becoming my favourite. I seem to be building up quite a collection as I’ve just bought a Land 1000, the type of Polaroid I remember best from childhood.

2) Why do you like instant photography?

I’m quite shy about approaching strangers to take their photographs, but carrying a Polaroid camera means that people are intrigued and very often will ask me to take their photo! It’s easy to get chatting to people, and they always have memories of Polaroid cameras themselves which they like to share.

I love the variety and depth of the images that can be produced; they sometimes have a lovely dark smokiness that can be quite hypnotic and at other times, the sharpness takes my breath away.

The Polaroid frame is such an iconic symbol; even now when companies want to show that an image is actually a photograph, they surround the image with a white polaroid frame. When I use Impossible film I think that the frame helps to convert my photographs into art. It points the way, focuses the eyes and says ‘Just take a second and look at this’. I’m proud to be a small part of the project that is re-inventing the films and using that iconic Polaroid frame in real instant photographs once more.

3) What is your earliest memory of instant film?

My father had a Polaroid camera when I was very young; to me it just seemed like an amazing magic trick. He’s renowned for never throwing anything away so I’m hoping that it’s still hiding in his house somewhere. I’ve had a good search but it’s not turned up yet!

4) What’s your favorite Impossible film type?

I’ve enjoyed using all the films over the past few years and seeing how they all give different effects. I do love the new Color Protection films though. The Silver Shade Cool is amazing too, and develops so quickly. I love this film for portraits, particularly the Mint “Freedom” Edition.

5) What are your favorite subjects to photograph?

Polaroids can have an very emotional feel about them. This works especially well for me with subjects that have a certain nostalgia to them; the piers and fun fairs of seaside resorts, cherished toys and old bicycles. I like my photographs to remind me of the atmosphere that I felt when I took the picture, even if they aren’t technically perfect.

6) Tell us about a project you’re working on.

I’ve been experimenting with printing some of my photos on to silk and other fabrics. The silk seems to accentuate the ethereal qualities of the images and I’d love to try more in this area.

I want to continue to develop new skills, and one of the things I’d like to try is to fix a Polaroid back on to an old quarter plate field camera that was my father’s. I’d love to take it out and about and see what I could come up with.

I’ve also signed up for the 600 on a 600 project organised by Snap It See It, which I’m really looking forward to.

7) Who are your favorite photographers, instant or otherwise?

I’ll concentrate on instant photographers, because I particularly want to mention the incredible support that comes from the Impossible community. The Impossible Project themselves are generous with their encouragement and feedback, and the Impossible community on Flickr and Twitter are always willing to share their time and resources. I’ve made some very good friends through my photography. Special mentions and thanks go to Meredith Wilson (who took the photo I’ve used for my portrait on this feature), Ben Innocent, Nick Tonkin, Toby Hancock and Tom Wright. They constantly inspire and motivate me.

As for professional instant photographers, I’ve recently come across Seaside Polaroids by Jon Nicholson. I bought the book as soon as I saw the title, as I love the faded grandeur of some of the seaside resorts. When I read in the introduction that he enjoyed the way people were interested in the process, and often approached him to ask questions about the cameras, it seemed to resonate with my own experiences.

8) If you could take a photo of anyone or anything what would it be?

I’d like to travel with my cameras, documenting my journey with photographs of people or places that catch my eye; having good times and making memories with family and friends.

About Hilary

I live in the North of England, near Manchester. I work for a independent book shop and I’m also studying for a Master’s degree in Children’s Literature. Photography balances all those words with images, and keeps me grounded.

Thank you to Hilary for taking part in 8 Exposures! To see more of her photography, please visit her Flickr photostream. You can also follow her on Twitter at @aitchclarke.

No. 781

8 Exposures...with Andrew Bartram

Patrick Tobin, | 1223 days ago

Welcome back to 8 Exposures, our ongoing instant film Q&A series. This entry focuses on UK photographer Andrew Bartram

1) What kind of Polaroid camera(s) do you use?

Mainly SX-70 Originals, I have two of those but one has recently stopped working, SLR 680, 250 and 103 Automatic Land Cameras.

2) Why do you like instant photography?

I can’t draw, paint or play a musical instrument so, along with my passion for the darkroom instant photography allows me an accessible creative release from the day job.

Although I have been a film user and printer for 25 years I have only been into instant photography for the last year when I bought my first 600 box camera on Ebay, shortly followed by my first SX-70. I love the sheer unpredictable nature of the Impossible films, even the fabulous Color Protection film behaves in different ways depending on light, heat and the variables associated with your camera. So it’s that unpredictability, the uniqueness of each image combined with those wonderful Polaroid Cameras that I love about instant photography??

3) What is your earliest memory of instant film?

That’s a real tricky one – I remember reading about emulsion lifts in an photographic journal in the 1980s – that seemed pretty cool. The thought of actually shooting a Polaroid all those years back never occurred to me, I was too busy getting super sharp black and white images in the darkroom. You know what they say, you never really appreciate something till it’s gone…..

4) What’s your favorite Impossible film type?

I have been STAGGERED by the new CP films, I thought the COOL stock was pretty good but you still had to mess around with shielding. The earlier First Flush color films gave real nice results and I kind of miss those but hey, a big well done to the Impossible Folk for giving us that wonderful CP film.

I also shot a lot of the Paul Giambarba Blue Film marketed by the Impossible Project, like a lot of older Polaroid material it’s becoming hard to track down now at a reasonable price

5) What are your favorite subjects to photograph?

I have never had a favourite subject, as a famous American photographer said “I photograph things to see what they look like photographed”, that seems like a pretty good reason to me. Having said that I am really getting into portraits of strangers using the new Color Protection film. If you try to go up to an interesting character and stick an iPhone in their face you’ll probably end up wearing it!, approach them with an SLR 680, and SX-70 or a Polaroid Land Camera and you immediately have something to talk about, they are put at ease and almost always agree to have their picture taken. They are a bit surprised that they have to wait 30 mins to see the result though so I do try to go back and show them the finished result and occasionally give a copy away although that breaks my heart!

6) Tell us about a project you’re working on.

Impossible Faces is an emerging project – see previous answer, hoping to develop that on our trip to Vietnam in 2013.

Also I’ve been using the Polaroid Type 100 Blue film in my 250 Land Camera to photograph groups of swans on the River Ouse in Cambridgeshire, the film really seems to suit this subject and each image can never be repeated as the swans tend not to behave to order!

Expired Polaroid 669 has also become a big fave over the last 6 months although its becoming expensive to buy.

7) Who are your favorite photographers, instant or otherwise?

Where do you want me to start, I guess up to date favourites on Flickr include “The Gentleman Amateur” for, in particular his beautiful expired Polaroid shots, “Rommel” for his wonderful Impossible Images using SX-70 and medium format cameras, Peter McCabe for his Impossible, expired Polaroid and film studies of the female form and the talented Ben Innocent for his creative and engaging Impossible images. Sorry to single out four names as all my Flickr and twitter contacts continue to inspire me day in day out with their wonderful skills and knowledge.

I love reading about and looking at the images of Walker Evans, Garry Winogrand and Robert Frank, all great American Photographers. I was recently given a copy of Dune by Edward and Brett Weston and their sand dune images are just staggering.

8) If you could take a photo of anyone or anything what would it be?

That’s anther toughie….if it were a person then I’d say anyone with a face that speaks of a life well led…..if it is a place then I try looking out my back door or in the Fens of Cambridgeshire. It’s a great challenge to see your local environment through strangers eyes, to recognise beauty in what for you, is the everyday and even mundane.

About Andrew

Born and raised in Great Yarmouth on the East Coast of the UK been living in the Cambridgeshire Fenlands for 12 years with my Wife and two children.

Day time job too boring to mention but big love to Darkroom and anything analogue – even my kids are beginning to get it!

To see more of Andrew’s work, visit his Flickr photostream. You can also follow him on Twitter at @warboyssnapper.

No. 777

8 Exposures...with Douglas Pope

Patrick Tobin, | 1227 days ago

Welcome back to 8 Exposures, our popular instant film Q&A series! This week, we’re happy to present to you a photographer friend from down under, Douglas Pope

1) What kind of Polaroid camera(s) do you use?

A beat up old SX-70 that is very much on its last legs, and a dusty, neglected 450 that I’ve not used in months.

2) Why do you like instant photography?

I like the quirks, knowing my camera so well I can plan a bleed or a leak – feels more personal…I also like knowing there is one copy, one original that is aging and deteriorating. It gives each image more weight I think.

3) What is your earliest memory of instant film?

Having a Polaroid taken of me at a circus in the UK, an elephant had its trunk around me, I couldn’t imagine a better way to remember it than that Polaroid.

4) What’s your favorite Impossible film type?

I was really into the old PX 70 Color Shade but more recently I’m using the PX 680 Color Protection heaps, I love the stability but sometimes miss the unpredictability of the older impossible stock.

5) What are your favorite subjects to photograph?

I think I secretly fixate on lonesomeness as a theme, I’m a big fan of the style of rückenfigur too, I think the two go hand in hand.

6) Tell us about a project you’re working on.

I saw the completion of the first LP (with my work used for the cover/ sleeve art) for The PJP Band. I’ve done most of the their EPs but seeing a 12” roll onto shelves was pretty cool. Aside from that I’m always working on little series here and there, most recently I’ve finished the following: “go then, there are other worlds than these” “old adaminaby” and “burials.”

I want to do something around the idea of hypnopædia too – maybe a rainy day project will come out of that as winter descends on Melbourne…but right now I’m having a bit of a breather – with the aim of doing some impromptu collaborations with old friends in London around June.

7) Who are your favorite photographers, instant or otherwise?

I’m loving the work that my friends over at pos1t1ve have been working on: lovely tintype images depicting a gritty, real London. Our mutual friend The Gentleman Amateur is still a strong contender for a “most important body of work in modern Polaroid” award if you ask me too.

A few other names that stick out at the moment are Søren bΛp†iŞ, Leanne Surfleet, Memetic, Coolhandluke, Amamak and Brigette Bloom.

8) If you could take a photo of anyone or anything what would it be?

I just want to be off adventuring, wouldn’t matter too much where I was or what I was shooting, the photographs usually find you on the road.

About Douglas

London-born, Melbourne-based. Pretty content just taking photographs, riding bikes and going on adventures.

Thank you to Douglas for taking part in 8 Exposures! To see more of his photography, please visit his Tumblr blog. You can also follow him on Twitter at @polaroidb0y.

No. 768

8 Exposures...with Chris Mettraux

Patrick Tobin, | 1237 days ago

Welcome back to 8 Exposures, our ongoing instant film Q&A series. This week, we turn the spotlight on Chris Mettraux

1) What kind of Polaroid camera(s) do you use?

J’ai la chance d’avoir une grande collection de Polaroids. J’utilise un Polaroid SLR 690, sx70, Polaroid 110 modifié pack 100, et un Polaroid 600 SE modifié par mes soins avec un dos 600 et sx70 qui me permet de régler diaphragme et vitesse…

I am very happy because I have a big collection of Polaroids. I work with several cameras, for example the Polaroid SLR 690, the SX-70, the Polaroid 110 modified for Type 100 pack film and the 600 SE modified by myself with a 600/SX70 back which allows me to set the aperture and the speed.

2) Why do you like instant photography?

Je suis photographe et ne travaille qu’avec des appareils argentiques ou des procédés anciens “cyanotype, Vandyke, ziatype et wetplate” donc le Polaroid et venu à moi comme une evidence. Je suis également modérateur sur un forum de Polaroid at www.polaroid-passion.com

I am a photographer and I only work with analog cameras or old processes like Cyanotype, Vandyke, Ziatype and Wetplate. So the instant photography came to me like evidence. I am also a moderator of a polaroid forum at www.polaroid-passion.com.

3) What is your earliest memory of instant film?

Une photo de famille avec un robot en peluche … Depuis il est tatoué sur mon corps.

A family picture with a plush robot…And now, it’s tattooed on my body.

4) What’s your favorite Impossible film type?

J’aime Impossible films même ceux du début car ils ont tous leur charme. Mais j’utilise beaucoup votre nouveau film PX 680 Color Protection et j’ai beaucoup aimé votre film PX 600 Silver Shade UV+ Black Frame. Je trouve que le cadre noir donne un coté classieux à mes images que j’adore…

I like all Impossible films, even the first ones. They all have something that I really appreciate, but the one I use more often is the new one, the PX 680 Color Protection. I also really like your PX 600 Silver Shade UV + Black Frame. I think that the black frame gives something very “classy”.

5) What are your favorite subjects to photograph?

Je fais un peu de tout mais ces temps je me concentre sur le portrait et le nu.

I work with a lot of subjects, but I really enjoy working with portraits and nude.

6) Tell us about a project you’re working on.

Je vais faire une demande de fond pour parcourir les routes de Suisse et d’Europe avec une camionette équipée d’un laboratoire photo pour realiser des wetplate … Comme au début du siècle avec les photographes itinérants…

I am going to ask for a photography grant because I have a dream that I really want to achieve…Travel around Switzerland and Europe with a van filled with a photography laboratory to make wetplate… Exactly like in the beginning of the century, with the itinerant people…

7) Who are your favorite photographers, instant or otherwise?

Oh, there are many! Sarah Moon, Araki, Hannah Villiger, Vivian Maier, Ansel Adams, David Burnett, Richard Mosse, Pieter Hugo, Igor Vasiliadis, Diane Arbus, Daido Moriyama.

8) If you could take a photo of anyone or anything what would it be?

J’aimerais retourner en arrière dans le temps pour faire photographe de nu dans les années 1830, ou alors les pins-up comme Bettie Page dans les années 1950 ou Dita von Teese pour être plus actuel…

I wish I could go back in the 30s and take some nude phototography, or even during the 50s to have the chance to meet Bettie Page and photograph her. And to be more realistic, I wish I could photograph Dita Von Teese…

About Chris

I first got interested in photography at the age of eleven during a class. Since then I never stopped taking pictures. I decided to work essentially with analog techniques and old processes.

To see more of Chris’ work, please visit his Tumblr and his Polanoid profile.

No. 755

8 Exposures...with Carine Wallauer

Patrick Tobin, | 1255 days ago

Welcome back to 8 Exposures, our popular instant film Q&A series! This week, we are happy to present you with the dreamy photography of Carine Wallauer

1) What kind of Polaroid camera(s) do you use?

I have a Polaroid 1000. When I was a teenager my literature teacher gave it to me. It was a gift from her grandma when she was eight years old, but she never used it. It was still in the box, untouched.

2) Why do you like instant photography?

I love the atmosphere. I love the way things appear just like I saw them in my imagination. I love the colors. I love the square format. I love to have it inside my shirt and close to my heart when I hide it from the light until the magic happens.

3) What is your earliest memory of instant film?

When I was a kid my uncle had a polaroid and used it to take pics of our family lunches. It was so magical to me! I still have one of them. (:

4) What’s your favorite Impossible film type?

I love both Color and Silver Shade.

5) What are your favorite subjects to photograph?

Nature, my beloved ones and my dreams.

6) Tell us about a project you’re working on.

My work is a continuous project. I can’t find a beginning or an end to it. It’s a very natural thing for me to take photos of my friends, my love and the places we love to be. It allows me to reframe reality and time mixing them with my old dreams and fragments of our collective memory.

Ah! I’m working on my first book, called “Elevated Visions of Eros”. It was originated from a project that me and other five friends created. It will be a collection of six small books that will be published independently. All funds were raised through crowdfunding. You can learn more about it on our facebook page:http://www.facebook.com/ehprecisoarrumaracasa.

7) Who are your favorite photographers, instant or otherwise?

I really love and respect the work of Ellen Rogers, Eliot Lee Hazel and Neil Krug. I also appreciate Aëla Labbé and Alison Scarpulla. My favorite photographers and artists are the ones who make me believe in the magic that still exists in life and in the things we are able to create. Life can be so boring, but it can also be fantastic! It depends on what we want to do with it.

8) If you could take a photo of anyone or anything what would it be?

I would love to photograph Jeff Buckley. But it’s impossible. So I want to continue photographing the ones I love and also what makes my world more beautiful and happy.

About Carine

Born in 1988. Residing in Brazil. Living a life in a dream.

Thanks very much to Carine for taking part in 8 Exposures! To see more of her photography, please visit her website at www.carinewallauer.com.

No. 749

8 Exposures...with Agafia Polynchuk

Patrick Tobin, | 1265 days ago

Welcome back to 8 Exposures, our popular instant film Q&A series! This week, we’re happy to bring you Agafia Polynchuk

1) What kind of Polaroid camera(s) do you use?

My one and only beloved is my SX-70. It’s a little crazy, like me. It loves to mess with me – sometimes it starts shooting dozens of pictures without my permission! It always plays tricks on me when I’m trying to decide to turn the L / D control to the darker or lighter side, if the room is dark. It doesn’t have a name, but I love it.

2) Why do you like instant photography?

Simply because it is magic.

3) What is your earliest memory of instant film?

There are a lot of polaroid pictures taken by my parents on in my photo album. I was about 4, I remember that I was putting ripe apricots into a blue bucket, standing on the roof of the shed surrounded by thousands of wasps. I wasn’t too interested in photography at that time.

4) What’s your favorite Impossible film type?

My absolute favorite was PX 600 + Black Frame. Daylight, black, white, and of course, grey – in my opinion, these guys make a great combination. If I decide I want all the colours of the rainbow, I’ll paint them in myself. This film is perfect for it. Some water, paper, aquarelle, PX 600 Lift … and voilà!

5) What are your favorite subjects to photograph?

As I mainly shoot self-portraits, then you might guess, who is my favorite subject to photograph ;). I’m not a writer, and I cannot draw. I try to visualize my thoughts, feelings and memories through photographs. I like to play with my associations with myself.

6) Tell us about a project you’re working on.

Last winter on the windowsill in the kitchen, I found an onion that had been forgotten by everyone. The bulb was old and not suitable as food. I decided to do a last portrait of it (likely it was the first one), before it embarked on its final journey. That’s how I got the idea to take pictures with a variety of flora. I still do it from time to time to this day.

7) Who are your favorite photographers, instant or otherwise?

Robert Mapplethorpe, David Hamilton, Jock Sturges, Helmut Newton…

8) If you could take a photo of anyone or anything what would it be?

It would be a photo of my new dog at my new apartment there. Sometime.

Thanks to Agafia for taking part in 8 Exposures! To see more of her photography, please visit her Flickr photostream.

No. 744

8 Exposures...with Dylan Boyd

Patrick Tobin, | 1269 days ago

Welcome back to 8 Exposures, our instant film Q&A series! This week, our star is Oklahoman Dylan Boyd

1) What kind of Polaroid camera(s) do you use?

I have a large shelf dedicated specifically toward displaying my vast Polaroid and instant camera collection, but I primarily use my SLR 680, SX-70 Sonar, Original SX-70, Spectra Onyx, Macro 5, and for packfilm I use a 250 Land Camera and a Holgaroid from time to time.

2) Why do you like instant photography?

There are so many reasons to love instant photography, for me it’s not only the nostalgic feeling it gives me, but also the tangibility and the time it gives me to escape this always growing digital world. I suffer from high anxiety and it gives me a chance to slow down, breathe, and be at one with myself and my art. I appreciate that I can compose a photo, snap the shutter and then have the image spit straight out of the camera. After that I love that I can watch all of these beautiful chemicals create an image right before my eyes. It’s an actual creation, not just a bunch of 0’s and 1’s on a hard drive. I consider it real magic.

3) What is your earliest memory of instant film?

The first memory of instant film I have is a photo that was taken of me and my parents along with my great grandmother on her ranch when I was only two or three years old. Being that young I’m not sure I would have remembered that moment if it wasn’t for the polaroid itself that I’ve held onto for many years. Other than that photo I did not have very many polaroids taken of me as I grew up and it was only a few years back that I bought my first Polaroid camera at a thrift store for only $8.99. I was only able to shoot Polaroid film for about a year before Polaroid discontinued its production of film and my local store sold out of its stock. With sadness I put my Polaroid camera away and did everything but forget about it. Then flash to one year ago when I discovered The Impossible Project, which re-sparked my love for instant film stronger than ever, I have been so honored to be a part of this journey with them and the evolution of their instant film products. I now use instant film more than any other medium.

4) What’s your favorite Impossible film type?

I’ve been in love with every Impossible film released since I discovered the project around this time last year. My favorite though would have to be the latest Color Protection film. This film produces such beautiful, sharp, and colorful instant photos, I’m beyond impressed with the results from it. Runner-up would have to be the Holden X Impossible film, the borders are a great accent to each image and I love the older film formula even with its tiny quirks that make each photo really unique and magical.

5) What are your favorite subjects to photograph?

I never stick to a certain criteria. I love photographing anything that sparks my interest and imagination. Ever since I started photography as a young teenager I have really enjoyed photographing cityscapes and skylines. I also love to explore and photograph abandoned places or structures, and last but not least I of course love photographing my wonderful girlfriend.

6) Tell us about a project you’re working on.

I’m continuously working on my Abandoned Oklahoma series. I have also been scheming on a top secret project with another instant photography pal, Justin Goode.

7) Who are your favorite photographers, instant or otherwise?

There are so many wonderful Instant photographers that inspire me, and it’s an ever growing list. Some of my many favorites would have to be The Gentlemen Amateur, Rommel, Brandon Long, Justin Goode, Ben Innocent, Toby Hancock, Kim Oberski, Tyler Tyndell, Troy Bradford, Ashley Saldana, Azuree Wiitala, Meredith Wilson, Celina Wyss, Dan Meade, and Kodachromer. I’ve also enjoyed the work of some of the folks on the Impossible staff such as Patrick Tobin, Anne Bowerman and Josie Keefe. The list goes on but I’ll have to stop there.

8) If you could take a photo of anyone or anything what would it be?

I’d love to take a camera and walk along the old railroad that winds through the Tai Ping Shan Mountain in Taiwan. It would be a dreamy scene for instant film. I’d also love to visit and photograph all the different sights in New York City. I have travelled all over the U.S. and that is the one place I have yet to go.

About Dylan

I was born and raised in Tulsa, Oklahoma. I am currently a student in college and I hope to turn my passion for photography into a career.

To see more of Dylan’s work, please visit his Flickr photostream. You can also follow him on Twitter at @_dylanboyd_.

No. 735

8 Exposures...with Phillip Pessar

Patrick Tobin, | 1283 days ago

Hello friends, and welcome back to 8 Exposures, our popular instant film Q&A series. This week, we are happy to bring you Miami-based photographer Phillip Pessar

1) What kind of Polaroid camera(s) do you use?

I have over 40 Polaroid cameras that I have found at the thrift store but I find myself going back to the same four over and over again: A Polaroid Pronto!, a Colorpack II for pack film, a Spectra 2 and the first Polaroid I ever bought at the thrift store in December 2009, a 636 Close-Up.

2) Why do you like instant photography?

I love the surreal look, especially with The Impossible Project films, and of course, I love that I get immediate results. I used to shoot a lot of 35mm film and although the results weren’t immediate I would have them in an hour after finishing the roll. Unfortunately, as fewer people shoot film local drugstores and big box stores are discontinuing processing and the few that still do process film do so little of it that the results are horrible. It now takes about 2 weeks to get 35mm back from a place that does decent work and I’m much too impatient to wait so long to see my photos. With instant film I have my photographs right away and not in two weeks and I love the results.

3) What is your earliest memory of instant film?

When I was in junior high my dad bought a Polaroid Swinger and I remember begging him to let me borrow it. I still have some of the photos I took with it.

4) What’s your favorite Impossible film type?

My favorite film was the PX 100 Silver Shade UV+ film. I seem to get the best results in South Florida’s challenging humidity using it.

5) What are your favorite subjects to photograph?

I love taking touristy snapshots with my Polaroids. The kind of photos that would have been taken originally with the lower end Polaroid cameras I tend to find at the thrift store. There are so many interesting things in South Florida to shoot: The art deco buildings, the beach, the vintage cars. I like the idea of rescuing the camera from the thrift store and letting it shoot at least one more pack of film, taking the type of photos it was originally designed to take. Not fine art necessarily, but a moment in time that someone on vacation might want to capture.

6) Tell us about a project you’re working on.

I’d love to retake a lot of the photos of roadside architecture I took with the last of the Polaroid 600 film I was lucky enough to purchase from The Impossible Project, using the new Impossible Project films. I think the Impossible Project films really lend themselves to shooting roadside architecture because of their dreamy surreal look.

7) Who are your favorite photographers, instant or otherwise?

My favorite photographers are all the photographers on Flickr using both expired Polaroid film and Impossible Project film who share their photos in all the many instant photo groups. I have gotten so much inspiration from them sharing their photos and posting interesting questions and comments.

8) If you could take a photo of anyone or anything what would it be?

I think I’d like to go to Havana and take photos of all the 1950s and older cars still running in the streets.

About Phillip

I was born in Miami and have lived here all my life. I work in finance.

To see more of Phillip’s photography, please visit his Flickr photostream. You can also follow him on Twitter at @photogphillip.

No. 732

8 Exposures...with David Bartholow

Patrick Tobin, | 1286 days ago

Welcome back to 8 Exposures, our ongoing instant film Q&A series! This week we’re happy to bring you Gorilla VS Bear Creative Director and photographer David Bartholow

1) What kind of Polaroid camera(s) do you use?

Polaroid Spectra System, Polaroid 600 OneStep, Polaroid SX-70 Pronto! B, Holgaroid, Polaroid One 600.

2) Why do you like instant photography?

Instant photography is responsible for consistently amazing work by countless photographers and individuals, and the mere existence of the medium is one of mankind’s many great achievements.

3) What is your earliest memory of instant film?

Having my portrait taken at tennis camp in the summer of 1983.

4) What’s your favorite Impossible film type?

Tough call. The new PX 680 Color Protection film, last year’s PX 680 beta, and/or the PX 600 Silver Shade UV + Gold Frame.

5) What are your favorite subjects to photograph?

Musicians, travels, walls, my cat + girlfriend’s dog.

6) Tell us about a project you’re working on.

Between work and GvsB, I’m juggling too many projects to mention and my head’s going to explode just thinking about it. At home, my girlfriend and I are filling up our walls with various prints and instant photographs, something that has officially entered “project” status, and, banal as the effort sounds, things are coming together slowly but surely.

7) Who are your favorite photographers, instant or otherwise?

Faith Silva, Anne Bowerman, Dave Bias, Chris Cantalini, Edwin Land.

8) If you could take a photo of anyone or anything what would it be?

Too many to list, really. A grilled cheese, Mark Twain, Francoise Hardy, John Lennon, and Larry David immediately come to mind.

About David

I’m originally from Dallas, TX, and relocated to Los Angeles in early 2012. In addition to my role as the creative director for Gorilla vs. Bear, I own and operate a boutique marketing consultancy that specializes in design for web, mobile, and print.

To see more of David’s photography, please visit flickr.com/dsbartholow and flickr.com/gorillavsbearpolaroids. You can follow him on Twitter at @dbartholow.

No. 726

8 Exposures...with Ashley Saldana

Patrick Tobin, | 1290 days ago

Hi friends, and welcome back to 8 Exposures, our ongoing instant film Q&A series. This week, we’re happy to bring you Maryland photographer Ashley Saldana

1) What kind of Polaroid Camera do you use?

I use a variety of Polaroid cameras. The majority of the time I use my grandparents’ Supercolor 635 CL Polaroid camera. Lately I have been shooting with my SX-70 Model 3 and my Spectra camera.

2) Why do you like instant photography?

I like the fact that every photo you take is completely different, even if you take the same shot twice. I love the minimal control I have of how the photo will develop – that’s what makes instant film so mysterious to me! You just never know exactly how your photo will end up. I also love how the anticipation builds up to watch something right in front of me develop in my hands. It’s like I’m capturing different bits and pieces of the world and taking them with me wherever I go.

3) What is your earliest memory of instant film?

When I was younger I remember my mom and grandparents showing me Polaroids of when my mom was my age. The Impossible Project is mainly what introduced me to instant film. I have yet to shoot with original Polaroid film, but I hope to in the near future!

4) What’s your favorite Impossible Film?

My favorite film type would have to be the PX 680 COOL film although the new PX 680 Color Protection film is beginning to grow on me. Not having to shield your photos at times can be quite convenient.

5) What are your favorite subjects to photograph?

I’ve recently been really interested in portraits, but I usually photograph just about anything. If it catches my eye I take a photo of it. I’m really drawn to bright and colorful subjects with a lot of contrast.

6) Tell us about a project you’re working on.

Well, I have noticed myself taking a lot of photos of my sister and I. Every week I try to take a photo of her, but only capturing the lower half of her body. Usually she is just standing there, or sometimes holding something she was using at the moment. I’ll take one of her and she will take one of me. This mini project has given us a chance to bond more, especially since she is starting to get into instant photography, which I’m so excited about! I’d also like to start another 365 day project. I started one a couple years ago but never actually completed it, I’d like to prove to myself it’s something I can accomplish.

7)Who are your favorite photographers, instant or otherwise?

Let’s start with saying this: I have met so many photographers on Twitter, Flickr, and Instagram and their talent is unbelievable! But at the moment I have one photographer who has really inspired me. His name is Ian Ruhter and he makes these beautiful giant photos using wet plate collodion. Did I mention he takes these photos with his truck he transformed into a camera?! How cool is that? He drives to different places to capture these breathtaking life-sized photos! He’s definitely a photographer I would love to meet someday. He has the same passion that I do when it comes to photography.

8) If you could take a photo of anyone or anything, what would it be?

I would really like to travel to Europe and photograph different places including Germany, Italy and Paris. I’d also like to photograph my grandparents who live in Germany. I think capturing moments with them would be intriguing especially because I don’t see them very often.

About Ashley

I am a photographer from Maryland, attending college to get my degree in photography. I also enjoy collecting vintage cameras.

To see more of Ashley’s photography, please visit her Flickr photostream. You can also follow her on Twitter at @Asshhleeyy_D.

No. 724

8 Exposures...with Patrick J. Clarke

Patrick Tobin, | 1293 days ago

Hello friends, and welcome back to 8 Exposures, our ever-popular instant film Q&A series. This week, we are pleased to bring you California photographer Patrick J. Clarke

1) What kind of Polaroid camera(s) do you use?

I was lucky and bought some Polaroids before the prices started going up….and I’m a bit of a camera nut, so I have more than a few.

My first Polaroid camera was actually my son’s One 600. It’s the camera that got me back into using instant film and then discovering The Impossible Project.

I have an SX-70 Sonar that’s been with me since First Flush came out, and then recently got my Uncle Larry’s SX-70 Alpha 1 Model 2 with the split-viewfinder. It’s been dubbed “The Uncle Larry” for obvious reasons. I love the Sonar, but I’ve been shooting with the Model 2 a lot more since it’s smaller than the Sonar, beat up looking and I love the split viewfinder in it.

I had a Spectra, but it started smelling like it was on fire every time I used it, so I replaced it with a black and red Spectra 2 with a close-up lens and the copy stand. I haven’t had a chance to play with it much, but love the Spectra format and will be using it more soon.

For pack film, I started with a Land 340, and a 210, but then I got a Land 250 and fell in love with it. It’s got the best viewfinder of any of the Land Cameras.

2) Why do you like instant photography?

I think instant photography combines the instant nature of digital photography, the strictness of analogue photography and mixes in a bit of traditional painting to make a very unique capturing medium that you can’t mimic.

I love being able to see an image in my head, shoot it, and quickly, but not instantly, see the results appear before me. You still have to slow down, but you can get pretty quick feedback and only having 8 frames puts the pressure on to see the only the good shots.

3) What is your earliest memory of instant film?

My earliest memories were my Mom snapping polaroids at birthday parties, vacations and any time something happened. My Dad was more of the photographer, but he used his Rolleicord or Canon and it wasn’t as often and it ended up being in a slide show when he wanted to bring out the projector. My Mom would just shoot everyday stuff, like me losing a tooth, or showing off a new Hot Wheel, and I loved the idea of capturing those everyday life things as important keepsakes and watching them develop right in front of me.

4) What’s your favorite Impossible film type?

I love black and white film in general, so my first love is PX 600 Silver Shade Black Frame. To me, it’s “The Impossible Project” film. I started with First Flush and when Silver Shade Black Frame came out, it was such a great leap in quality and look that I couldn’t get enough of it…and that black frame was just plain cool.

But, after shooting PX 70 Color Protection, I am a die-hard PX 70 fan. I like that I don’t have to use an ND filter with my SX-70 and I love the contrast and clarity that the PX 70 has. Being able to shoot in the sunlight and not having to worry about boxes or bags and rushing into the dark like a vampire is such an amazing thing for anyone that has been shooting Impossible film for awhile. If Impossible made a black frame version of PX 70, I’d be in heaven.

5) What are your favorite subjects to photograph?

One part of me loves taking pictures of mundane things, but putting them center stage. I don’t try to idolize them, but try to appreciate the object as it is, especially if I find them in a setting that is different than they were originally intended.

The other part of me, as anyone that looks at any of my work will see, is how much I love photographing my beautiful wife. She is such a joy and I’m always fascinated the way light falls on her.

6) Tell us about a project you’re working on.

I am continuing my experimentation of putting Impossible film in cameras they weren’t made for. I started with my RB67 and Silver Shade, but I am now focusing on using my Graflex Speed Graphic 4 X 5 with the new PX 70 and PX 680 Color shade film. I like having total control over the exposure and depth-of-field and the 4 X 5 gives me that control as well as great look when coupled with Impossible film.

To complement that I am also starting to use the new Color Protection film and my SX-70 to document the adventures that my wife and I go on. The idea started when I was shooting 6 X 9 film and only had 8 shots in a roll. A buddy of mine suggested shooting 8 shots that made up a story, and then presenting the roll as a single, long transparency. I tried it once and loved it. So, when I took my first trip to New York I wanted to try something similar. I had a such a great time shooting 16 images that said “New York” to me, and look forward to putting them up as an entire group on the wall.

7) Who are your favorite photographers, instant or otherwise?

It might sound cliche’, but I look up to Ansel Adams for his technical skills and how he always embraced experimental things in photography, Henri Cartier Bresson for making me appreciate the moment, Bill Cunningham for being Bill…nice, honest and unimposing, and Alfred Stieglitz and his photos of Georgia O’Keefe. His relationship with O’Keefe really hits close to home for me.

Impossible Flickr users are too many to mention all of them, but people like Justin Goode, rommel©, kimunscripted, The Gentleman Amateur, lawatt, andrewmillar14, tenminutes, Andrew Bartram (WarboysSnapper), Dylan Boyd, anniebee, Bozowizard, and tobySX70 are all very active and are constantly pushing the envelope of what you can do with Impossible film.

8) If you could take a photo of anyone or anything what would it be?

I would love to do product photography with Impossible Project film for a catalog for a cool brand like Anthropologie, Swatch, Urban Outfitters, etc. Combining Impossible film with cool brands really is an exciting market.

About Patrick

Patrick J. Clarke lives in Temecula, California, and spends his work day as a Senior UX Designer at Slacker Radio. Most other times he is on some sort of adventure and can be seen with at least 2 cameras in hand and some sort of plan on capturing the world around him.

To see more of Patrick’s photography, please visit his Flickr photostream. You can also follow him on Twitter at @patrickjclarke.

No. 720

8 Exposures...with Celina Wyss

Patrick Tobin, | 1300 days ago

Hello and welcome back to 8 Exposures, our ongoing instant film Q&A series! This week, we turn our lens on Celina Wyss

1) What kind of Polaroid camera(s) do you use?

I’m always scouting sales and thrift shops for more but currently I shoot with a few different SX-70s, 3 Spectras and have just started playing with a Colorpack IV. My vintage camera collection extends far beyond those however and my closet is full of various 600 models and more. I’m pretty certain I’m going to need a new system for storing them soon.

2) Why do you like instant photography?

I love that what you see is what you get. There is no digital doctoring after the fact and for me that actually feels freeing. I love the imperfection that comes with instant photography. You are free to let the photo be what it is, flaws and all. Instant photography is truly about being in the moment. You stop, just for a moment and witness the world around you. You notice the temperature, the light, the shadows all in a moments time. You take a breath in and then you click. Then waiting for the shot to develop is the icing on the cake. It’s like magic!

3) What is your earliest memory of instant film?

Looking back I think I missed out on a right of passage with instant photography. My dad was the family photographer and always shot with a 35mm so my earliest memory of a witnessing a real Polaroid shot eject was at the dentist. I was in elementary school and had no cavities (yay!) so I got to have my portraits displayed on the wall of honor a few times. I still have them saved in albums to this day! Later on in high school I spent all 4 years in the dark room but never had a chance to use a Polaroid. I’d like to think I am making up for it now.

4) What’s your favorite Impossible film type?

That is really hard to choose! Some of my favorite shots were taken with PX 680 Cool. PX 70 Color Protection is pretty amazing too!

5) What are your favorite subjects to photograph?

I love to shoot nature and still life mostly. I think it is a double win if I can shoot vintage memorabilia on vintage cameras.

6) Tell us about a project you’re working on.

This is sort of a secret and still very much in the planning process but I’m hoping to start a Kickstarter campaign next spring for a very fun project next summer. I’m not ready to spill the details yet but it involves instant photography and travel.

7) Who are your favorite photographers, instant or otherwise?

Growing up I was always enchanted by anything Ansel Adams. I think he was the true master of photography. Susannah Conway was one of the first people that really got me excited about instant photography. It was seeing her shots that got me started looking for my first SX-70 2 years ago. Mia Moreno was also an early instant favorite for me with her gorgeous self portraits. Thanks to social media I now have an entire community of photographers that inspire me every single day. Truly there are too many to name.

8) If you could take a photo of anyone or anything what would it be?

One of the things on my Life List is to photograph a castle in Ireland. How beautiful would that shot look on Impossible film? I can only imagine for now.

Thank you to Celina for taking part in 8 Exposures! To see more of her photography, you can visit her Flickr photostream. You can also follow her on Twitter at @CelinaWyss.

No. 717

8 Exposures...with Ghee Dondlinger

Patrick Tobin, | 1304 days ago

Welcome back to 8 Exposures, our popular instant film Q&A series. This week, we are very happy to bring you German photographer Ghee Dondlinger

1) What kind of Polaroid camera(s) do you use?

I own two SX-70 models, one of which is a sonar, which is the model I prefer as at allows me to use auto focus; and I also own a Supercolor 635 CL model which I use primarily in low-light conditions.

2) Why do you like instant photography?

I like lo-fi photography in general for its unpredictability and the way the images turn out less than perfect. Instant film in particular I enjoy because they add their own specific sense of ‘unreal’ to the resulting image, a somewhat painterly quality. And for the challenge to make every exposure count. Also, in this digital age, it’s nice that there still are a few things which you can actually touch and hold.

3) What is your earliest memory of instant film?

I think my first conscious exposure to instant film was a book published in 1984 by singer/songwriter David Sylvian. Entitled ‘Perspectives’, it featured collages made from Polaroid photographs. My first hands-on experience with instant film was when I moved to Berlin and one of my flatmates owned a Polaroid camera, which was much used by everyone living in or visiting the flat.

4) What’s your favorite Impossible film type?

I’m using both the new PX 70 PX 680 protection films and get great results with both, but the 680 has gradually turned out to be my favorite film. I also enjoy the PX 100 and PX 600 Silver Shade Cool films, but there no favorites (yet).

5) What are your favorite subjects to photograph?

In general I prefer urban themes. That can be people in the streets, but also architecture, or simply ‘urban fragments’ – details that document city life. For example, this summer I photographed a lot of disused buildings and public spaces that became occupied by squatters, urban nomads or artists; focusing not so much on the buildings but rather on the details of how this occupation expresses itself – be it urban art or improvised living spaces.

Furthermore, I also like working with themes that reflect a city’s history – cemeteries for example.

6) Tell us about a project you’re working on.

I’m always busy shooting all around Berlin – that is kind of an ongoing project. Also, I haven’t done much people photography with the Polaroid cameras yet, so that’s a project I would like to start on, although I have yet to find the right approach.

7) Who are your favorite photographers, instant or otherwise?

I like artists who have a more spontaneous, less formal approach to photography. Nan Goldin is one of my favorites, as is Mark Morrisroe, a portrait photographer who used to work and experiment a lot with Polaroids, and who also liked to include technical imperfections in his photos. There are also ‘amateur’ photographers like writer Allan Ginsberg who put together a remarkable collection of portraits over the span of his life; or Japanese photographers like Masatoshi Naitoh whose photos illustrate the changing face of post-WWII Japan.

And harking back to David Sylvian, I also like the collection of new instant photographs which he put together for his recent ‘Glowing Enigmas’ exhibition and catalogue (done in co-operation with Impossible Project).

8) If you could take a photo of anyone or anything what would it be?

I’ve been to India, but not to Northern India, and not with my Polaroid cameras. So that’s one project I hope to embark upon sometime. The colors of India and the Polaroids should be an ideal match. Also, people in India are a lot less averse to having their picture taken than people in the West are, so a trip there should also provide plenty of opportunities for more portrait photography.

About Ghee

Originally from the tiny country of Luxembourg, I have been living in Berlin, Germany, for a while now. A software developer by profession, I worked in oil painting before turning to lo-fi, analogue photography some eight years ago. I also enjoy traveling a lot, and a large portion of my photographic output stems from trips to various corners of the world. When time permits, I also shoot and construct digital videos on the Mac.

To see more of Ghee’s work, visit his Flickr photostream. You can also follow him on Twitter at @gheedon.

No. 710

8 Exposures...with Erin McGuire

Patrick Tobin, | 1311 days ago

Welcome back to 8 Exposures, our popular instant film Q&A series. This week, we are happy to bring you California photographer Erin McGuire

1) What kind of Polaroid camera(s) do you use?

The types of Polaroid cameras that I have are an SX-70, Spectra, and a few OneStep 600 box type camera. I also have a few Polaroid backs for large format and pinhole cameras that I like to use, and one Holgaroid.

2) Why do you like instant photography?

There are a lot of reasons why I like instant photography but what it all really boils down to is the quality of the images taken on any kind of instant film. They have their own special look and personality, especially Impossible Project film. No matter what you do with an Impossible Project image, whether it be an emulsion lift, drawing on it, or manipulating it in the digital darkroom, you can tell it’s an IP image because of its distinct characteristics.

3) What is your earliest memory of instant film?

I was born in ’65 and it seems like instant film was always around, but my own personal experiences with the film came when a coworker gave me her old Spectra camera and I took pictures of my boy when he was just a toddler. I still have some of those pictures and the very first IP picture I ever took was with that same Spectra camera.

4) What’s your favorite Impossible film type?

Right now, that would have to be the new PX 70 Color Shade film. The colors I get with that film just blow me away. After that, it would have to be PX 600 Silver Shade Black Frame. I love how the film can shift tones from pure black and white to sepia.

5) What are your favorite subjects to photograph?

Landscapes. Any kind of landscapes, but a current favorite with the PX 70 film are the fantastic sunsets I see here in the desert.

6) Tell us about a project you’re working on.

I am currently working on a new series of image composites titled On The Surface. It is based on deception and how the things we see at first glance, and usually take for granted as being the whole truth, are really only one small part of a much larger story that we have to dig deeper to get to. This series has come about due to the recent discovery of a life-threatening illness that a beloved family member has actually had for some time now. In looking at photographs from a few years ago, I realized, in ways I never dreamed of, that even straight photographs can lie, no matter how truthful the photographer and subject hope to be. Working with many different modes of capture, I am combinging images in Photoshop to create landscapes that appear factual at first glance, but that will begin to reveal a greater truth upon closer examination and thoughtful reflection.

7) Who are your favorite photographers, instant or otherwise?

Aha, this is my favorite part!

To start off with, some well known choices are Keith Carter, Rocky Schenck, Ken Rosenthal and Susan Burnstine. Some of my new favorites are Gary Isaacs, Michael Kirchoff, Astor Morgan, and Alex Stoddard. I have so, so many more favorites. Please check out my favorites list on Flickr to find them. Most of my favorite photographers can be found on Flickr, including This Fleeting Life (Janine Matheson), Moominsean (Sean Rhode), TobySX70 (Toby Hancock) and The Gentleman Amateur.

8) If you could take a photo of anyone or anything what would it be?

I would love to go to Alaska with a thousand packs of various types of Impossible Project film and take pictures of everything, but mostly, the aurora borealis. Could you just imagine the aurora on the new PX70? I sure can!!!

About Erin

I live in the Palmdale/Lancaster area of Los Angeles county, also known as the Antelope Valley. I am a student at the Academy of Arts University, San Francisco, online and am a full time computer support specialist with a software company in Fountain Valley, CA.

To see more of Erin’s photography, visit her Flickr photostream and her Tumblr. You can also follow her on Twitter at @ekm123.

No. 708

8 Exposures...with Greg Brophy

Patrick Tobin, | 1314 days ago

Hello dear friends, and welcome back to 8 Exposures, our popular instant film Q&A series. This week, we are very happy to bring you Greg Brophy

1) What kind of Polaroid camera(s) do you use?

I own one of just about all of the major Polaroid cameras. I use the SX-70 Sonar for color, an SLR 680 for black and white and a Spectra AF for both. I also love my Automatic 250 Land Camera for Chocolate film. I have a modified 110B, but the rangefinder is very sensitive to motion so I only use it in the studio.

2) Why do you like instant photography?

I love it I think for the same reasons most other people do. You can take a photo and have something in your hand that develops without the need for a darkroom. The fact that you have a physical object. I love the vintage-style colors and the way it looks without having to do anything to it in the computer. I used to spend a lot of time on the computer to get my images to look the way that Impossible films look. Now I can spend more time taking photos and developing my ideas.

The happy accidents I get when I shoot with it, the unpredictability of it. When I shoot digital, I know exactly what it will look like before I even shoot it. With Impossible film, there is still room for unexpected surprises.

A lot of my work now revolves around the idea of fast and instant, of nostalgia and what is here today is gone tomorrow and you are only left with this instant photo. Now most of my work really makes use of the instant process and idea of nostalgia.

3) What is your earliest memory of instant film?

My grandfather had an SX-70 and I have a Polaroid of me during my First Communion that he took. In college when I was learning photography, I used Type 55 all the time and it was my favorite. When I first started working, it was at a fashion company and we used to get models that came in to show us their portfolios. The assistants used to shoot a Polaroid of them in the lobby and bring us the photos to choose which model we wanted to use. Now I work for a music company that plans on shooting photos of all the musicians that come in with instant film and hang them on the wall of the Green Room. For me through out my life instant film has always been there.

4) What’s your favorite Impossible film type?

For black and white, hands down it has to be the PX 600 Black Frame and PZ 600 Black Frame. The black frame for me really compliments the warm tones I get with the film. I rarely use black and white film with the white frame. For color film, I really love the two new Color Protection films. I tend to prefer the PX 680 Color Protection because I tend to shoot in dark places, but I also love the colors of the PX 70 Color Protection. I am also really excited about the 8×10 film and am currently working with it on my latest project.

5) What are your favorite subjects to photograph?

A lot of what I shoot revolves around neighborhoods and how they change either over the years through Hyper Gentrification or through seasonal changes. I really enjoy taking photos at night and in the snow. There is something about the cold dark quiet of the night during a blizzard in the city that I love.
I do travel a lot and like to take my Polaroid cameras with me. I often get so many looks and questions when people see me shooting with an SX-70. In the past have shot a lot of burlesque dancers in NYC and I would like to start photographing them again using Impossible Film.

6) Tell us about a project you’re working on.

Right now I am working on a series based on the banking crisis and Occupy Wall Street. I am shooting black and white, Black Frame Impossible film and 8×10 film. I peel them and either gold leafing or copper leafing the images based on the subject. The instant nature of the film is really perfect for this series and I can’t imagine shooting it without Impossible Film.

The other major project I have been working on since I started using Impossible Film is a series about shore towns and how they change from season to season. Most of what I have included is from this series.*

*This was written before Hurricane Sandy. All the photos presented here are from Point Pleasant, Belmar, Asubry Park and Manasquan N.J. After visiting recently I got a first hand look at these areas and with the exception of the Fireman’s Fair, all of these places are either severely damaged or gone.

7) Who are your favorite photographers, instant or otherwise?

Michael Lange’s book Wald is amazing for the subtle gloom of his landscapes. Christian Patterson’s Redheaded Peckerwood for the use of non photographic and found items to tell the story. Anne Golaz’s book Metsästä and for her unique way of telling a story. James and Karla Murry, I have been following for a long time on fFlickr, they have excellent photos of a NYC from the past. Dead_Dolly, who I found recently and has a huge treasure of photos of the city from the 80s. I would encourage people to check her photos out to see the NYC I remember growing up here. When was the last time you saw a burnt out car on Crosby St.

As for instant photographers, I love the community that has been built up on Flickr and Polanoid. My favorite photographers are Bozowizard, amamak photography, and of course The Gentleman Amateur (I think he is mentioned in just about everyone of these), moominsean and option8 for the photos but also all the valuable knowledge they share. From Polanoid: jaytral, Soreal, mattjudas and papayaspoint.

8) If you could take a photo of anyone or anything what would it be?

I love to travel. I get bored very easily if I stay in one place to long so I like to photograph places I have never been. To see new faces and new places.

To see more of Greg’s photography, please visit his Flickr photostream.

No. 698

8 Exposures...with Justin Goode

Patrick Tobin, | 1324 days ago

Hello again, Instapals! Welcome back to 8 Exposures, our ongoing instant film Q&A series. This week, we bring you our good friend, Dallas photographer Justin Goode

1) What kind of Polaroid camera(s) do you use?

A Mamiya RB67 w/ an instant back, Polaroid Automatic 100, Spectra AF, Sonar SX-70 and a SLR 680.

2) Why do you like instant photography?

The whole process is special. You expose a frame, which is then pushed through rollers, smearing developer goop across a negative. A chemical reaction takes place and voila, an image materializes. That is tangibility at its finest. Within minutes you have a work of art in your hands. I like that, because of its analog nature, outside variables can shape the final outcome of the image. Another bonus of instant photography is the connection people have with the film. It’s incredibly nostalgic. Most, if not every person I’ve shot using instant film, smile & exclaim something about how neat, cool, awesome, amazing, unique it is. I couldn’t agree more. It’s all of that and then some.

3) What is your earliest memory of instant film?

There was a place in town that we used to have birthday parties at, Penny Whistle Park. I remember seeing Polaroids used there quite often.

4) What’s your favorite Impossible film type?

PX 70 NIGO and the COOL films are at the top of the list. I’m a big fan of the quirks they have and I enjoy the minor imperfections. For me, that’s what helps to make these images unique. I really hope that Impossible will re-release some of these more popular lines of film in the future.

5) What are your favorite subjects to photograph?

I like to shoot practically everything. I find myself wanting to become well versed in all aspects & subjects with photography. Instant photography, which most everybody reading this knows, is useful for many applications but has boundaries in which it thrives. Some subjects are challenging because of its limitations. I enjoy learning about the ‘space’ in which it can be used.

6) Tell us about a project you’re working on.

I’m currently working on a few photo projects. One is for Minter’s Thunderbirds here in town. The owner, Amos Minter, has given me access to his shop. I’m working on a long-term project, documenting the restoration process of his Thunderbirds and photographing images of his employees. When I’m finished (months or years down the line), I will be making a photo book for Amos & his family. They are very kind people and I feel it’s the least I can do for them. Another project I’m involved in is with Dylan Boyd. We’re currently working on a collaboration of images. I’m writing the blog article and will be sharing it soon. The last project I’ll mention is purely personal. Photographing family & friends, to one day make a book, showcasing people that have inspired and touched my life.

7) Who are your favorite photographers, instant or otherwise?

Many of the classic greats come to mind; Henri Cartier-Bresson, Richard Avedon, Margaret Bourke-White, Ansel Adams, Julius Shulman, Philippe Halsman and Eugene Smith are just a few.

8) If you could take a photo of anyone or anything what would it be?

I spent a few days in 2006 on Kwajalein Atoll in the Marshall Islands. I wasn’t into photography then, but I would LOVE to go back there with the knowledge I have now.

About Justin

I’m a photographer/drummer who lives in Dallas, TX and I’m completely obsessed with film & instant photography.

To see more of Justin’s work, please visit his Wordpress blog and his Flickr photostream. You can also follow him on Twitter at @justinsgoode.

No. 695

8 Exposures...with Amy Siân Green

Patrick Tobin, | 1328 days ago

Greetings Impossible friends, and welcome back to 8 Exposures, our very popular instant film Q&A series. This week, we’re happy to bring you UK photographer Amy Siân Green

1) What kind of Polaroid camera(s) do you use?

My SX-70 gets used the most and is my most beloved. I also have two 600 Onestep cameras, one of which used to belong to my dad. They take turns on breaking, usually because I keep getting sand inside them by accident. And who could forget my poor little I-Zone that hasn’t been used since I was ten years old…

2) Why do you like instant photography?

I like that I’m using the same medium that my grandfather used to use. I like that I can hold a Polaroid taken in the late seventies next to a Polaroid taken forty years later and the difference is miniscule.

Funnily enough it’s the slowing down that I prefer when it comes to instant photography. There is a tendency to shoot digital at speed and in multitudes, but with film you have to take your time. And even once the photograph has shot out of the camera, you can sit and wait for the picture to develop in your hands. It’s the magic of the darkroom, without the chemical headache that you’d think an art student would have gotten used to by now…

It’s weird and wonderful and there’s nothing quite like it.

3) What is your earliest memory of instant film?

I remember being around six years old and my grandfather was letting me play with his Polaroid camera, so I raced next door to photograph my aunt and uncle. It’s the first photograph I ever remember taking and I still have the slightly tattered image to this day.

4) What’s your favorite Impossible film type?

I love the PX 600 Black Frame film so so much, but I’m a sucker for colour, so I’d have to say PX 680. My SX-70 has always preferred the higher ISO film and recently the new colour protect film has just blown me away so that’s always good!

5) What are your favorite subjects to photograph?

People. I think instant film is a great medium when it comes to portraiture. With the SX-70 you have to get quite up close and personal with the subject and it lends an intimacy that can sometimes be lost in some of the more distant mediums. I love trying to catch someone when they’ve dropped their guard—which is pretty hard with an SX-70 so it’s all the more rewarding when you do.

Also the sea. I have a love affair with the sea…

6) Tell us about a project you’re working on.

I’m ¾ way through a Polaroid 365 on Flickr at the moment and I’ve really enjoyed reminding myself of how much I love instant film, especially in Autumn. All those pumpkins and colourful leaves were made for polaroids.

7) Who are your favorite photographers, instant or otherwise?

Elliott Erwitt and Annie Leibowitz have always amazed me, & Cathleen Naundorf has such a great approach to fashion photography with Polaroid film. Lou Noble really made me see instant film in a whole new light, especially when it came to portraiture, & The Gentleman Amateur has this crazy gift when it comes to bringing out the best in expired film. I love seeing any updates by His & Hers, Rommel, Supercapacity, Anniebee, Coeurenbois, and the rest of Flickr’s great instant photographers.

8) If you could take a photo of anyone or anything what would it be?

My grandmother. She was very shy as I remember, and I’m sure she’d have the same reluctance as my mother when it comes to standing still infront of a camera, but a year or so ago I found these beautiful photographs of her from the 40s, and I’m insanely jealous that I never got the chance to see her like that; from behind the lens. I can imagine the polaroid in my head plenty; I just wish it existed.

About Amy

I’m a 22 year old photographer from Wales, in the UK. I love drawing and working in the darkroom, but I love my SX-70 just that little bit more.

To see more of Amy’s photos, visit her Flickr photostream. You can also follow her on Twitter at @amysgster.

No. 687

8 Exposures...with Lee Summers

Patrick Tobin, | 1342 days ago

Welcome back to 8 Exposures, our ongoing instant film Q&A series. This week, we are happy to bring you Georgia photographer Lee Summers

1) What kind of Polaroid camera(s) do you use?

My first love, the SX-70 original. An SLR 680 SE that saved me in the dark days of Time Zero discontinuation. And the beautiful, translucent Spectra Onyx for when I want to roll wide.

2) Why do you like instant photography?

It’s like the difference between a tamagotchi and a real pet. It’s one of a kind and unpredictable. Tangible. It’s a conversation starter. It’s been said so often before but this is real magic right here and we need more of that in this world. Plus, when my hard drive eventually dies and I lose all of my digital photos, I’ll still have my Polaroids. And someday, someone else will have them and wonder why I’ve kept so many blurry photos.

3) What is your earliest memory of instant film?

For some reason, I can’t recall ever growing up with a Polaroid camera in the family, though my parents have albums of them that run counter to my memory. The turning point in my adult life was when I was given a donated original SX-70 by a manager at a thrift store I used to work at in the early 2000s. I fell in love with the mechanics and design and since Time Zero was still readily available at the time, I was instantly hooked.

4) What’s your favorite Impossible film type?

PX70 Color Protection and PX100 Silver Shade UV+ but I’m sure that will change as soon as the next wondrous film is released.??

5) What are your favorite subjects to photograph?

My beautiful wife, our cat, my friends and family, and the beach, always the beach. In all, just the act of shooting instant film and that slowly unfolding end result is what I ultimately prize.

6) Tell us about a project you’re working on.

There are a couple things that I have mental notes in check for. I’d like to do a series on the grey graffiti-buffing squares that appear on the walls around Atlanta in Silver Shade film. Maybe I’ll call it 50 Shades of Grey. Also a series around church and fast food sign sayings in our surrounding neighborhoods. There is one that says “god only reads knee-mail” that I always chuckle at when I pass by.

7) Who are your favorite photographers, instant or otherwise?

Hiroshi Sugimoto, Johnathon Kelso, Matthew Moore, Amy Stein, Mike Brodie. And the community of photographers and instant lovers on Flickr that I’ve followed and been inspired by for ages.

8) If you could take a photo of anyone or anything what would it be?

The landscapes of Mars.

About Lee

I’ve lived in Atlanta, GA for the last decade but was transplanted here by way of New Mexico, Malaysia & Missouri. I’m an Art Director at an ad agency by day. I’m also a passionate Arsenal Football Club & Atlanta Braves supporter, both sources of extreme depression. Lastly, I co-run and design for a small record label called Geographic North.

To see more of Lee’s photography, please visit his Flickr photostream. You can also follow him on Twitter at @wakeupcall.

No. 680

8 Exposures...with Sarah Seené

Patrick Tobin, | 1346 days ago

Hi friends, and welcome back to 8 Exposures, our ongoing instant film interview series. This week, we are very happy to present you with French photographer and filmmaker Sarah Seené

1) What kind of Polaroid camera(s) do you use?

Since I began to work with instant film, I use a Polaroid 636 Close-up camera from 1992, which my dear aunt gave me. When I was a child, I used this device to photograph my grandmother’s animals…

2) Why do you like instant photography?

What interests me in the instant photography is its spontaneity, suspense and surprise. I prepare my instant photos a lot… During one hour or two, I set up costumes, sets and make-up which are going to give sense to the central characters of the photo. It is the contrast between the direction and the speed of the development that interests me and, of course, the magic grain of the instant photo, inimitable.

When the photo comes out, my heart is beating at top speed ! For me, instant photography is synonymous with emotion and sensation!

3) What is your earliest memory of instant film?

A few weeks ago, my mother offered me her first photo of me when I was an infant, and it was a polaroid. Obviously I didn’t remember taking this picture… But I do remember very well the very first Polaroid I made: when I was 7, the day of Christmas with my Grandma, we had just decorated the Christmas tree, I was so happy to decorate it with her, and the result was so beautiful that I wanted to immortalize this great moment. So the first polaroid I made was a picture of my Grandma posing in front of the colorful Christmas tree. The camera I used is the same one I use today!

4) What’s your favorite Impossible film type?

I love color and silver shade films by Impossible Project. I mostly use PX 680 Cool and PX 600 Silver Shade UV+ Black Frame which I sometimes mix in superposing. I’ve also just discovered the new PX 680 Color Protection film. Its colors are so sublime that I am going to become addicted to it!

5) What are your favorite subjects to photograph?

My models, most of the time feminine, are the ones that I love, my Mom and my friends. I like inventing stories, universes, characters that inspire me.

??I color my polaroids of the pictures of childhood, dream and fear, in the idea of suspended time with worlds which I made by modifying the reality.
When the polaroid is ended, I like stressing its surrealist dimension by working again it with a double-exposure or by adding some nail polish above which gives a plastic art effect.??

What interests me through my fabrication is the feelings, the trouble on the spectator.

(6) Tell us about a project you’re working on. (This does not have to be a formal project, it can be something you find yourself taking a lot of photos of or something you’d LIKE to be working on)
At the moment, I’m continuing a black and white serie that I began this summer inspired by famous fairy tales. This serie is named “Il était une fois” (” Once upon a time “) and I make it with PX Siver Shade black frame films.
I have just begun a new serie of colour polaroids named “ The kingdom of dogs “ where strange feminine characters are next to dogs on the lands of a kind of lost paradise.
Finally, since a few months I begin to work with Lomography cameras. I aim to make a serie of autumn portraits with a Diana F +.

(7) Who are your favorite photographers, instant or otherwise?
My favorite photographers are Joël-Peter Witkin, Sarah Moon and Tim Walker.
In instant photography, I love the work of Stefanie Schneider, Amanda Mason, Marion Lanciaux, Emilie Lefelic, Claire Oring, and so many others polaroiders that I discovered on the Impossible Project website.

(8) If you could take a photo of anyone or anything what would it be?
For a few months, I had the opportunity to photograph artists who inspire my work like the singers Emilie Simon, Rosemary Standley (of Moriarty) or Maïa Vidal. The persons I would dream to photograph are the sisters Cassady of Cocorosie, Katiejane Garside (of the group Queen Adreena) or … Björk ! And I’d also like to photograph an unicorn or a ghost but as it’s impossible, I try to make these by myself !

About Sarah

Welcome to Sarahland! I’m French, 25 years old, and I’m fascinated by the power of the image. I’ve been a director of fiction and experimental short films for a few years and I’m an instant film addict. People say about my work that it shows a singular world, an atmosphere between poetry and anxiety.

To see more of Sarah’s work, please visit her Tumblr and her Pinterest. You can also follow her on Twitter at @SarahSeene”:https://twitter.com/SarahSeene.

No. 669

8 Exposures...with Andrea Palei

Patrick Tobin, | 1355 days ago

Hello, friends. Welcome back to 8 Exposures, our popular instant film Q&A series. This week, we’re happy to bring you long-time Impossible supporter and wonderful photographer, Italy’s own Andrea Palei

1) What kind of Polaroid camera(s) do you use?

I started shooting instant film with the “Polaroid 1000 red button” of my dad. I am passionate and I bought an original SX-70 (my favourite camera), from there I became insane, and I started collecting as many instant cameras as possible. I often use original SX-70 and SLR 680. And sometimes the Spectra and Colorpack II.

2) Why do you like instant photography?

It’s magical. The thing I love most about the instant photography is the unpredictability of the outcome, and the possibility to “touch” the photo and see it “born” slowly under my eyes. Those are things that fascinate me again like the first time.

3) What is your earliest memory of instant film?

The very first memory: I was a child and my father was taking polaroids at the beach and birthday parties.

4) What’s your favorite Impossible film type?

My favorites are PX 680, PX 70 and PX 100 UV+.

5) What are your favorite subjects to photograph?

With the instant film I like to photograph strange stuff, the geometries and abstract lines. But most of all I like to photograph people.

6) Tell us about a project you’re working on.

I’m going to start a series of portraits of my friends and my family using the last packs of Polaroid 600 that I have in my fridge. A sort of farewell to original Polaroid film.

7) Who are your favorite photographers, instant or otherwise?

Some of my favorites are masters such as Robert Frank, Louis Ghirri, Annie Leibovitz and Elliot Erwitt.

I really like the “instant” works of Lou O ‘Bedlam, Richard Ton, The Gentleman Amateur and Rommel Pecson.

8) If you could take a photo of anyone or anything what would it be?

I would go back to America and make the same trip of seven years ago but with polaroid cameras, because in 2005 I did not use instant film.

About Andrea

I am an Italian photographer, I am 34 years old and live in Tuscany. My dream is to live for a year in Australia.

To see more of Andrea’s work, please visit his Blog and his Flickr photostream. You can also follow him on Twitter at @amnesiak1978.

No. 665

8 Exposures...with Bria Morrison

Patrick Tobin, | 1356 days ago

Welcome back to 8 Exposures, our ongoing instant film Q&A series! This week, we are happy to bring you California photographer Bria Morrison

1) What kind of Polaroid camera(s) do you use?

My folding SX-70 is the love of my life and my very first “real” (as in not automatic everything) Polaroid camera. I found her on eBay in early 2009 and she’s still one of my greatest treasures. Since then I have fallen for my Spectra which is perfect for quicker shooting at weddings or other on-the-go occasions. And, not to forget my latest acquisition, my beloved Polaroid 180 Land Camera.

2) Why do you like instant photography?

I really love everything about instant photography but the one thing I love above all others are the images themselves. They’re soft and clear all at once. Painterly. You can blow them up HUGE and they remain some of the most beautiful photographs I’ve ever seen. There is no equivalent in the digital or standard film worlds.

3) What is your earliest memory of instant film?

Even though instant film was in my life for many years before this, the first time I can honestly say I remember what it was like to be photographed on instant film was on Grandparent’s day when I was in elementary school. My grandma, mom and I all posed for a picture & held up this little paper bunny I had made for Easter. They put the photograph in a little card and I just loved that I got to watch it develop right in front of my eyes. I still have that photograph in my memory box.

4) What’s your favorite Impossible film type?

I love them all but the PX 680 Color Protection film really makes me swoon. The new opacification films make shooting with my Polaroid cameras so much easier and it won’t be long before we can watch our photographs develop in our hands once again. Pure magic!

5) What are your favorite subjects to photograph?

I’m a little bit obsessed with photographing cats but in truth, I love to photograph nearly everything in everyday life. I am always on the hunt for a chance to pull out my camera whether I’m strolling around unfamiliar streets in Morocco or stretching my legs in my own neighborhood. Lately I’ve also come to love bringing my Polaroid cameras to various weddings and portrait sessions. My clients always love it when I can hand them a photograph I have just taken, instantly locking that moment in their hearts.

6) Tell us about a project you’re working on.

I’m currently completing a project I started back in February 2012. I spent two weeks in Morocco photographing the sights and details using Polaroid and Impossible Project film. I am currently working on gathering these photographs and a few stories from my adventures into a beautiful keepsake book which I will then make available, along with limited edition prints, in my online shop and gallery shows.

7) Who are your favorite photographers, instant or otherwise?

Some of my current favorites include: Chloe Aftel, Jan Scholz, Jennifer Altman, Penny De Los Santos, Heidi Swanson, & Sally Mann

8) If you could take a photo of anyone or anything what would it be?

I dream of someday being able to photograph a seasonal catalog for Anthropologie or creating a stunning feature for Kinfolk magazine.

About Bria

I’m a California based wedding, lifestyle, and fine art photographer.

To see more of Bria’s photography, check out her Facebook page. You can also follow her on Twitter at @TheDizzyPixie.

No. 658

8 Exposures...with Francisco Chavira

Patrick Tobin, | 1360 days ago

Hello, instanteers. Welcome back to 8 Exposures, our popular instant film Q&A series. This week, we happily bring you wonderful California photographer Francisco Chavira

1) What kind of Polaroid camera(s) do you use?

Like most photographers, I get GAS or Gear Acquisition Syndrome; It’s incredibly easy to get! There are Polaroid cameras everywhere at my place. However, I was challenged by a fellow photographer to stick to one camera and one film, to learn everything about that one camera and that one film. So, I shoot almost exclusively with an SX-70 Sonar. I’ve learned that the sonar doesn’t work most of the time, so I manually focus all the time. Sticking with this one camera, I’ve grown very comfortable with it and shooting it has become very natural. It’s truly an amazing camera, the depth of field and the sharpness of the SX-70 is stunning.

2) Why do you like instant photography?

As a film photographer, having an instant photo at your disposal is incredibly rad. Not only do you get the satisfaction of seeing how your images will look right away, but your subject gets the feeling of accomplishment as well. All the effort your subject put into makeup, hair, posing ect. is worth it. Instant film is powerful, because it has a unique ability to alter someones mood. To think how this one tiny square image, can uplift and excite is amazing. Having that power to instantly uplift your subject on a portrait shoot is powerful.

3) What is your earliest memory of instant film?

Well it’s a funny one. I was born in Mexico and we migrated to the states when I was 3. We didnt have much spending money growing up, only the essentials. One day we were walking to school with Mama and we spotted an old Polaroid 600 box camera in a pile of trash. We where beyond elated, my sister and I had always wanted a Polaroid. From then on we would save our pennies and dollars to buy packs of film at the pharmacy.

4) What’s your favorite Impossible film type?

My favorite film is the newest PX 70 Color Protection. I was able to test it out before release and it is amazing. I shot 4 packs in no time and I feel I’ve really learned it. No crystals, sharpness increased, color is better, no more light patches from improper shielding. Seriously what more can we ask for? The PZ 600 Black Frame is killer. The best integral black and white film I have used by Impossible. The cinematic quality of the spectra coupled with the sharpness and wonderful tones of this film, create so much beauty.

5) What are your favorite subjects to photograph?

Portraits are my strongest point. As much as I have tried to make my vision full of dreamy, surreal images. I know I am not that. I have to be true to my voice. My voice is all about portraits so I am focusing on mastering portraiture and creating minimal captivating images of people.

6) Tell us about a project you’re working on.

There are two main projects I am set on. One is a personal vision I have been planning in my head for 3 years. It’s a bit complicated because it involves a custom gown and a perfect cliff overlooking the ocean. Another project is a new Instant Film Photography blog called SnapItSeeIt.com a few buddies of mine are making. It will feature only instant film and help promote the use of it and include things such as shooting techniques, film reviews and featured artists. It will launch early next year.

7) Who are your favorite photographers, instant or otherwise?

One of my all time favorite portrait photographers is Mark Seliger. The incredible minimalism his portraits have is just phenomenal. His fashion work is so minimal and big at the same time. There is an incredible attention to every detail that makes even the most basic portrait have an incredible amount of content. I strive to one day master portraiture the way he did.

8) If you could take a photo of anyone or anything what would it be?

Being born in Mexico and have migrated here at a young age, I missed out on having a real connection to it, aside from small family vacations we took there later in life. I dream of traveling to Mexico taking portraits of everyday people, along with making meaningful portraits of my relatives, I’ve come to know by phone calls. Sadly, the current state of unrest Mexico is in keeps me away. I also would love to get my hands on a couture gown for this vision I need out of my head.

About Francisco

I live in Sacramento, California. I am a photographer, second shooter and assistant to various wedding photographers. A part-time barista as well.

To see more of Francisco’s photography, visit snapitseeit.com. You can follow him on Twitter at @jwlalo.

No. 649

8 Exposures...with Ashley Jae Fly

Patrick Tobin, | 1370 days ago

Welcome back to 8 Exposures, our popular instant film Q&A series. This week, we bring you Tennessee photographer and new mom Ashley Jae Fly

1) What kind of Polaroid camera(s) do you use?

I use several different Polaroid cameras, but the three I use the most are a Spectra System, an SX-70 Sonar & a Sun 660 I’ve pretty much retired the rest of them.

2) Why do you like instant photography?

I’m in love with instant photography because of its permanence, magic, and the nostalgia I feel when I shoot with it. It’s imperfect, which in my eyes makes it that much cooler. I love the static of it, and the fact that what you see is what you get. We don’t scan our instant photographs and then edit them in photoshop. It is what it is.

3) What is your earliest memory of instant film?

My earliest memory of instant film is when I was 5 and dressed terribly as a Ninja Turtle for Halloween. There were polaroids taken of me at an earlier age, but this was the first time I’d actually remembered the sound of it and it stuck with me. I still feel that young sometimes when I hear the shutter click and the film eject. It’s one of the happiest sounds I can imagine.

4) What’s your favorite Impossible film type?

My favorite film so far has to be the PX 70 Color Shade. I love the vividness/crispness of the colors. A close second would have to be the PZ 680 for Spectra cameras. I’ve gotten some beautiful results with it as well.

5) What are your favorite subjects to photograph?

I will never stop photographing dead animals. You can call me gross, but there is so much beauty in death! I feel like you can bring something back to life with a good photograph, and instant film makes it so much more magical. I also love to shoot anything with the Spectra Close-Up attachment. I’m addicted to macro shots.

6) Tell us about a project you’re working on.

My newest project is actually this really cool human that just came out of my body. I’ve been growing her for 10 months and haven’t stopped taking photos of her since the moment I saw her. I got out of the car after we’d returned from the hospital the other day and was happy to find some of the Cool film in my mailbox. I hope everyone is prepared for the overload of adorable baby polas, because I’m stoked. Otherwise, I’m not allowed out of the house with her yet, so I’m not working on anything new at the moment.

7) Who are your favorite photographers, instant or otherwise?

My favorite? The Gentleman Amateur! I’m sure you all know why. Also, Dan Ryan – who has the most amazing collection of Time Zero shots I’ve ever seen in my life. His shots are what my dreams are made of! Otherwise, my favorite black and white photographer is Francesca Woodman – who has inspired me throughout the few times I got really into doing self-portraits on black and white.

8) If you could take a photo of anyone or anything what would it be?

My new goal is to visit Nairobi and stay the night in the giraffe manor. I’ve been wanting a giraffe encounter for a few years now, and also have really wanted to explore Africa – so I’d kill two birds with one stone with that one.

About Ashley

I’m from Nashville, TN and I’m a self-taught photographer. I used to make pizza, but now I’m a brand new full-time stay-at-home mom which is way cooler than working.

To see more of Ashley’s photos, please visit her Wordpress Blog. You can also follow her on Twitter at @7treehouses.

No. 644

8 Exposures...with Carla Triolo

Patrick Tobin, | 1377 days ago

Welcome back to 8 Exposures, our ever-popular instant film Q&A series. This week, we’re very happy to bring you the photography of Carla Triolo

1) What kind of Polaroid camera(s) do you use?

My favorite camera is my folding SX-70 Sonar. I take it with me everywhere. If not for the fear that I would roll over and crush it, rendering it useless and reducing me to a blubbering incoherent heap on the floor…I would snuggle with it in bed every night. It was the first Polaroid camera I was truly successful with. Out of all the cameras I have, I find it the most portable and it has always yielded great results. I also use a Spectra SE, a Polaroid Land Model 250 and my grandfather’s Polaroid Land Model 350.

2) Why do you like instant photography?

I love the unpredictability of instant photography. No matter how I picture an image turning out I am never 100% on point. You never know exactly what will happen. Also, I appreciate the fact that unlike digital photography, I can’t just delete and retake as I please. This makes me focus a lot more on what I want to photograph and how. I think the extra care and thought really shows through in the pictures. You can tell how much love was put into it.

3) What is your earliest memory of instant film?

I remember looking through old Polaroid pictures of my parents and falling in love with the nostalgia and the look of it all. My earliest memory using a Polaroid camera was when I was in high school. I had found a Polaroid Rainbow One Step in my parents’ closet. I was intrigued by it, ran to the store right away and bought myself some film. On the fly I just took some quick photos of friends but didn’t really know anything about how to use it so the pictures didn’t come out very well. Shortly after my friend dropped that poor camera and it no longer functioned properly. I mourned that camera for a week or so, and hung it around my bed post for years. That led to a break in my Polaroid obsession for about 12 years.

4) What’s your favorite Impossible film type?

That’s a tough question, they are all so great for different reasons. The film I am using quite a bit recently is PX 680 Color Protection. I use it with an ND filter in my SX-70 because I seem to get better results with the PX 680 film. But I am a big fan of PX 70 Cool film. The colors are always amazing. The film I am most surprised by would have to be PX 600 Silver Shade UV+. The speed at which it develops and the contrast that I always seem to get gives me a warm fuzzy feeling.

(5) What are your favorite subjects to photograph?

Common themes to my photos seem to be landscapes, statues and flowers. I really love to find beauty in decay, so the imperfections of an old weathered statue, or a rotting flower petal, really speak to me. Nothing is perfect and the attributes that make us different from one another are what make this world beautiful and that beauty is worth capturing.

6) Tell us about a project you’re working on.

A few months ago I started a project called “Face Lifts” which has taken a back burner to… well, life. I took different portraits, cut them up and would collage different facial features together. I found it a very calming process. But my recent obsession (besides going taking pictures in general) has been my Polaroid illustrations. I have been active in The Impossible Project’s, Make Your Mark contest and have fallen in love with the Impossible Pens. I find myself going through old photos to find something I can sketch over. Sometimes, I even take a photo with that in mind. I love that thanks to this contest, I have been handed this amazing way to bring 2 different mediums together with a really cool and unique result. Honestly, it’s something I’m not sure I would have attempted otherwise.

7) Who are your favorite photographers, instant or otherwise?

Ansel Adams has always been a favorite and I recently discovered his beautiful Polaroid photography. Truly some amazing landscapes and nature shots and I was surprised to find that he dabbled in instant photography. Another photographer I recently began to enjoy is Walker Evans. I don’t know much about him but was immediately drawn to his photography.

Some of my favorite photographers out there are the very talented people I have met through Flickr and Twitter. Ben Innocent has a natural talent and a fantastic eye. There is so much beauty in miss Kim Oberski’s photos. Her images always seem to convey a story. Some others are Toby Hancock, The Gentleman Amateur and Andrew Millar. I could go on and on. There are so many talented photographers out there, it really is amazing what these wonderful people can do with a camera.

8) If you could take a photo of anyone or anything what would it be?

I think if I could photograph anything it would be the Pyramids of Giza or a dig at the Valley of The Kings. I have always had a deep fascination with Ancient Egypt and its artifacts. Would be amazing to get up close to a real archaeological dig and document it through instant photography, maybe even get my hands a little dirty.

About Carla

I am 29 years old, working in New York as an Associate Art Director when I’m not working I am annoying my friends and family by dragging them on photo walks or stopping them mid-conversation to take a photo.

To see more of Carla’s photography, please visit her Tumblr and her Flickr photostream. You can also follow her on Twitter at @The_Kodachromer.

No. 640

8 Exposures...with Gregory Geiger

Patrick Tobin, | 1381 days ago

Hello, friends, and welcome back to 8 Exposures, our popular instant film Q&A series. This week, we are happy to bring you Rhode Island artist and photographer Gregory Geiger

1) What kind of Polaroid camera(s) do you use?

Other than a few button pushes when I was very young, I started my own instant film aventure with a Polaroid Joy Cam. I got frustrated with the strange form-factor, even though I loved the ease of multiple exposures. After that my constant companion, for about two years, was an i-Zone camera. I loved the ease of use and the size of the camera, but when I got frustrated with the ultra tiny images, I transitioned to a Polaroid One. I used that grey box cam until I ran out of the original Polaroid film. I finally gave that camera away, which was a sad day indeed.

When Impossible Project started making film, I was a little bit hesitant. I wasn’t sure if it was going to be the real thing or how long it was going to last, so I picked up a Green One Step Express from the NYC store. I fell in love with the First Flush film, fell in love with the Impossible Project itself, and three months later got the SX-70 Alpha One that I am madly in love with and literally carry with me everywhere.

2) Why do you like instant photography?

Instant film is a unique piece of art. It’s not a negative or one of an infinite number of prints, it’s a (nearly) instant tangible picture of that moment frozen in time. It is an image that has captured the actual light from that place.

There is also something about the medium that makes me slow down. I spend so much more time composing the shot; more than I do with my roll film cameras, and WAY more than I ever do with my DSLR. I know that all of the extra time I spend with my subject makes those shots better in every way.

One other thing is that you also get people who see the camera or the picture and are automatically transported to a distant time and place. It’s a 3×4 piece of nostalgia. No one who has ever seen one of my Polaroid shots or even just my SX-70 walks away without a smile on their face.

I love instant photography.

3) What is your earliest memory of instant film?

I remember being on my grandparents’ porch, at around 4 years old, and my mom taking a picture of me with a black box that made a lot of noise. She handed me the little square of plastic and told me to shake it until a picture appeared. That was pure magic. I walked around and showed everyone with wide-eyed amazement.

4) What’s your favorite Impossible film type?

I still have a weakness for the PX 100 UV+ FILM. That has got to be my favorite film so far. The images that I have been able to pull with that film are some of my best shots. The blacks are really great and you get a hint of sepia in the whites and greys. I also have a lot of romantic memories of the PX 70 PUSH film and some of the color that I have been getting out of the new COOL film is just so beautiful.

5) What are your favorite subjects to photograph?

I find that what I am trying to capture is that fleeting feeling of a moment. A cup of coffee with your gal, or sitting in the park during the farmers market, or the way that the sunlight burns shadows into the side of a building.

But when I think about the shots that I want to take, the ones that I am really drawn to shoot, are portraits. I want to shoot people in natural lighting, with shallow depth of field, and unposed. I want to try to capture the real person behind the smile, or the unwavering gaze. I think there are elements of a person that can be more easily revealed through the lens.

6) Tell us about a project you’re working on.

I want to do a full portrait series based on the experience that I had with my Farewell Portraits. I want to get as many people as I can in front of the camera in a single evening and see what comes out of it, to then take the 80+ black and white shots and get them all up on a wall one week, month, or year later.

If the sky is the limit, I would also love to do a shoot of all the Richard Serra pieces that I could possibly find. The work that he does and how it captures physical space, form, and light is absolutely photo worthy. To shoot a bunch of those and blow them up to 5’ x 5’…it would be dreamy.

7) Who are your favorite photographers, instant or otherwise?

The stuff that Grant Hamilton does with Polaroids completely floors me every single time I see his work. Each shot is more beautiful than the next. I also love some of the early work of Jean Loup Sieff, his portraits are amazing and his shot of Alfred Hithcock is one of my favorites of all time. But when asked this question, I always have to point Harry Callahan, not only for his photographic work (tone, shadow, composition) but also for his work that he did with his constant model.

8) If you could take a photo of anyone or anything what would it be?

My first response is that I would love to do a shot of Edwin Land, but my girlfriend said that kind of answer sounds like I am pandering to the audience…So we will go with my second choice, I would love to do a full Polaroid shoot of Andy Warhol. That would be a completely mind-blowing experience. To work with him on capturing the perfect photo of him, nothing would be the same afterwards.

About Gregory

I am an old school geek and New England newbie, a budding pressman and leadtype lover. I am a painter, photographer, sculptor, designer, martial-artist, creative technologist, and comic-book fan. Yes, I really am all of these things. I recently moved from Northern California, with three cats, and a very lovely girlfriend; to a great apartment in Providence, Rhode Island. I pay for my instant film habit by working at a local university and helping teachers innovate uses of technology in the class room.

To see more of Gregory’s photography, please visit his Flickr photostream. You can also follow him on Twitter at @gregorygeiger

No. 634

8 Exposures...with Giacomo Inches

Patrick Tobin, | 1388 days ago

Hello everyone, and welcome back to 8 Exposures, our instant film Q&A series. This week, we are happy to present to you Italian photographer Giacomo Inches

1) What kind of Polaroid camera(s) do you use?

I feel very comfortable with the SX-70 and the Spectra/Image camera. If I have enough space, I definitely put them both in my bag. But I like to test and experiment with different cameras as well. I recently acquired an SLR 680 and I also like a Land Camera 340 that was given to me as a present. I also turned an Image camera with broken shutter into an Image pinhole camera that returns wonderful b/w images. Sometimes I play with a 630 LightMixer or a 1000 camera. At the end of the day, my wife is always complaining about all the cameras I have around (too many).

2) Why do you like instant photography?

I love photography in general because it can capture a particular moment (that is already gone, due to the impossibility of stopping time) into a particular frame. Instant photography, however, is one step further: a second after you shoot, the moment you fixed through the camera becomes ‘tangible’ in your hands. You can observe the picture becoming reality and finally seeing and remembering and feeling that moment you just lived & shot. Moreover, compared to the modern digital photography, the instant returns a unique picture: even if you scan it, it will never be the same as the single original one. I still find people getting surprised by the self-development of the picture and its appearing ‘like magic’ … and they wait minutes to observe the final result and are amazed by the particular colors or grayscale tones they are not used to seeing. Last but not least, instant pictures are also a tangible trace that we leave after us and that allows our children and grandchildren to better understand us and our time.

3) What is your earliest memory of instant film?

Well, I remember my grandmother wanted (and still wants!) a “polaroid” picture of me and my brothers in front of the Christmas tree every year… At that time I was laughing (and I was a bit bored, too), but now years and years later I am the one that goes around in my grandmother’s house over Christmas and shoots pictures of everybody with that nice 600 camera…

4) What’s your favorite Impossible film type?

My favorites are PX 680 and PZ 600 Black Frame…I try to give the PX 70 a chance but I always go back to PX 680…one of the most impressive release was the PX 680 Beta test film in 2011 and now I’m excited about the new Impossible stuff that is about to come out but I could not test directly as Pioneer because was sold out ;)

5) What are your favorite subjects to photograph?

I like to take pictures of everything that captures my attention…mostly objects, flowers, nature, traffic road signs, sometimes people and situations where these elements combine together with the “right” light. The light is the key: to get the right colors and shapes that express my feeling on that particular moment.

6) Tell us about a project you’re working on.

Wow, so many projects in mind…I’m working on emulsion lifts and transfers on the subject of musical instruments. As a background I’m using sheets of music score and over the score, the lifted instant images and here and there (like salt and pepper effect) some blue ink, like the artist had just written the music. I am also thinking about a set of portrait pictures of local shop owner whose shops have a long family history (e.g. more than 50/60 years) and another set of images of my city using my modified-to-pinhole Image camera and PZ 600 films (like postcard of late 1800/early 1900, with the pinhole representing the photographs of that time).

7) Who are your favorite photographers, instant or otherwise?

Well, thinking about instant photographers my favorite is Maurizio Galimberti that I’ve met on several occasions. I like his de- and recomposed portraits and landscapes. However, in the specialized online networks I’m following (the Impossible gallery, polanoid.net and polaroiders.it) I have the pleasure to continuously meet great photographers that stimulate my creativity in different ways. I should mention one above the others, who introduced me to instant photography in 2008: Paolo Annibale. Without him this interview would never had been possible. I always find interesting inspirations from his works, too.

To continue and mention other photographers, I have an admiration for the “first” great pioneers of late 1800 and early 1900, Alfred Stieglitz in particular. I would suggest to read the Camera Lucida (in French, La Chambre claire), published in 1980 by Roland Barthes to have other good pointers. Furthermore, I try to visit as many exhibitions as I can because every photographer has something to tell me and teach me.

8) If you could take a photo of anyone or anything what would it be?

I would like to take portraits pictures of common people that I meet during my daily life and who capture my attention for something: color of the clothes or accessories, intensity of the eyes, expression on the face, a tattoo, hair…But I am generally too shy to go and ask them and I know they might be bored of posing with a very demanding and picky photographer :)

About Giacomo

“I’m currently finishing a PhD in Informatics at the University of Lugano, Switzerland but I am living in Italy, near the wonderful city of Como. I grew up between Italy and Switzerland, therefore I consider myself divided between these two countries. In 2008 I discovered instant photography thanks to a friend and since then I’ve been taking care of and growing this passion every day.”

Thanks to Giacomo for taking part in 8 Exposures! You can follow Giacomo on Twitter at @giacomoinches.

No. 632

8 Exposures...with Leanne Surfleet

Patrick Tobin, | 1391 days ago

Welcome back to 8 Exposures, our ongoing instant film Q&A series. This week, we are pleased to bring you UK photographer Leanne Surfleet

1) What kind of Polaroid camera(s) do you use?

I have a few different Polaroid cameras but the main 3 I use are my Spectra, 450 Land and non-folding SX-70.

2) Why do you like instant photography?

Well, I never thought of myself as an impatient person but when it comes to photography I like to see the results instantly! Then I feel that I can move on with my shoot and change things up. I just find it exciting and feel that it’s a great skill to master, to have a certain control over your instant photographs. I’ve been shooting instant film for around 6 years now and I’m still completely amazed and confused by the whole process! Only having a certain amount of exposures makes me think about each one carefully before pressing the shutter, I’ve learnt over the years to not get too excited about a fresh pack of film and waste them. I cherish each and every one of my instant photographs. Also, the colors and imperfections are perfect to me and I have never (and don’t think I ever will) found anything that comes close to the quality of Polaroid and Impossible film. I am completely in love with it.

3) What is your earliest memory of instant film?

My earliest memory of instant film would be a Type 80 Polaroid I have of my parents from the 1970s. I’ve always loved the photo because it’s small and square and the colors are just perfect, also because they look happy and I love to think of them using Polaroids before I was born and here I am now still using it in 2012.

4) What’s your favorite Impossible film type?

I think that my favorite Impossible film is PX 680, I just can’t get enough of those deep colours and sometimes random bursts of light, also the new color protection is wonderful! Another favorite is PZ 600 Silver Shade UV+ Black Frame. After getting such experimental results from the first flush Silver Shades I was so surprised at the clean whites and deep blacks from this film.

5) What are your favorite subjects to photograph?

I shoot a lot of self-portraits, but I wouldn’t say I was my favorite subject. I’m intrigued by the female form and the often mysterious nature of women. Lately I have a bit of a thing for shadows and light. So whenever the sun is shining I’m on the hunt for lovely shadows to shoot. Also, my cat!

6) Tell us about a project you’re working on.

Since 2008 I have been almost constantly taking self-portraits, so I would say that that is a long-term project I am working on, and will continue to do so until the day comes when I find something I didn’t know I was looking for.

In the near future I am hoping to work on a self-published book of my photographs. I love to see photographs in print and think that this would be a great thing for me to work on and to see everything together as a whole body of work would be amazing.

I’m currently in my final year of university studying photography so there are going to be a few projects lined up in the next couple of months, including documenting my health and hospital visits, a series of poetry inspired work, and I am hoping to shoot my first nude!

7) Who are your favorite photographers, instant or otherwise?

My favorite photographers are Francesca Woodman, Nan Goldin, Ana Casas Broda, Floria Sigismondi, Cindy Sherman, Duane Michals, and Diane Arbus. My favorite instant photographers are Stefanie Schneider and the Polaroid’s from Robert Mapplethorpe and Andy Warhol.

I am also greatly inspired by my peers and the amazing photographers I have met through Flickr, such as, Emily Hunt, The Gentleman Amateur, Annette Pehrsson, Michela Heim, Shelbie Dimond + lots more!

8) If you could take a photo of anyone or anything what would it be?

When I first started taking photographs I loved exploring old and dilapidated buildings, and I have always wanted to travel Europe and go to Berlin to photograph inside the Beelitz-Heilstätten. Other than this there are certain people that I long to photograph and hope to one day.

About Leanne

I’m from a small seaside town, Cleethorpes in England. I am a fine art photographer working predominantly with analog and instant cameras.

To see more of Leanne’s photography, please visit her Flickr photostream and her Facebook page.

No. 618

8 Exposures...with Ritchard Ton

Patrick Tobin, | 1402 days ago

Welcome back to 8 Exposures, our popular instant film Q&A series! This week, we are proud to present you with Florida photographer Ritchard Ton

1) What kind of Polaroid camera(s) do you use?

I have several sx-70s, an automatic 100, 195 land camera, numerous plastic One Steps, and a modified one shot into a pinhole.

2) Why do you like instant photography?

First, it was about watching the photo develop.
After that, it was about instantly having a photo to document the moment.
And then it was the ability to manipulate the photo.
And then it was the camera. The SX-70 is the best camera ever built. Yeah, I said ever.
And then it was the excitement of being a part of the creation of a new film and process of perfecting the film.
Now, it’s all of the above.

3) What is your earliest memory of instant film?

As a child, my family had a Kodak Handle instant camera. To me, watching instant photos develop was amazing. Not having to take a roll of film to local photomat kiosk in the A&P parking lot and wait a week to see the photos was really something special.

4) What’s your favorite Impossible film type?

I love all of the impossible films. From the first PX 100 First Flush to PX 680 Cool, I like the fact that the company has included us on the process of perfecting the film. I was amazed at the tonal quality of their black and white film and love the color palette of the color shade. And, they all can be manipulated! And lifted! I appreciate the fact that they considered manipulation as a factor for engineering the film. It shows they know their market.

5) What are your favorite subjects to photograph?

I have multiple favorites. I’m always packing multiple cameras loaded with different film when the family goes to an amusement park or county fair. I like the idea of large mechanical devices hurling bodies through the air, flipping, spinning and tossing to the delight of the passengers and the anticipation of the people in line. I also like to photograph nature, family and objects around the house.

6) Tell us about a project you’re working on.

I like to use the manipulation ability of instant film to create short animations. The process involves manipulating a single photo and scanning each manipulation to create a stop-motion film. I’m currently working on a stop-motion animation that is combined with live action. I have the rough portion of the animation complete but there are some minor logistic factors keeping me from filming the live action sequences. I hope to work these problems out and finish filming soon.

7) Who are your favorite photographers, instant or otherwise?

An article in Popular Photography magazine about Michal Going’s Time Zero manipulations of the US Open that first introduced me to the SX-70 manipulation process. His images led to my manipulation addiction.

Larry Burrows’ image “Reaching” from the Viet Nam War opened my eyes to the power of the still image.

There are many photographers on Flickr are sources of inspiration. I’m constantly astounded at the talent on that site.

8) If you could take a photo of anyone or anything what would it be?

Back in the late 80s I traveled to Paris and fell in love with the city. I’d like to go back and shoot the city streets and sites.

About me

Originally from NOLA, now living on the Gulf Coast of Florida. I was a full-time professional photographer for about 15 years (back before all this digital mumbo-jumbo), then part-time for another 5 while earning a degree in computer science.

To see more of Ritchard’s work, please visit his Flickr photostream. You can also follow him on Twitter at @sx70manipulator.

No. 612

8 Exposures...with Rich Burroughs

Patrick Tobin, | 1409 days ago

Hi friends, and welcome back to 8 Exposures, our popular instant film Q&A series. This issue, we’re happy to bring you Oregon photographer Rich Burroughs

1) What kind of Polaroid camera(s) do you use?

The main one is an Image 1200i, it’s one of the Spectra cameras with an LCD. I’m really enjoying the Spectra aspect ratio lately, it feels very cinematic, so that one is getting most of the work. I have a bunch of others though. A couple of SX-70s, a 180, some 600 cameras, a Clincher, and backs for my Hasselblad and Holga.

2) Why do you like instant photography?

It’s that magic of seeing the images develop. I work a lot with models and they really enjoy seeing the images come to life, it gives them a lot of confidence when they see that we nailed a shot. And it’s nice to be looking at a finished print. When I shoot digital, there are images that look great on the LCD but don’t work when I see them on my monitor.

3) What is your earliest memory of instant film?

We had Polaroids when I was a kid, my dad was into photography and they were so common. Polaroid and Kodak are the two brands that really dominated photography in my childhood. I never shot the cameras but I played with them as toys.

I bought an SX-70 Sonar about five years ago, and the first time I held the button down to do the sonar focusing I had this crazy visceral flashback. We must have owned one when I was growing up. I knew immediately that I’d had that same sensation many times before.

4) What’s your favorite Impossible film type?

I’ve been shooting a lot of the Image Softtone film over the last year and a half, but I’m starting to transition some into the Impossible films as I know the Softtone won’t be around forever. Right now it’s the PZ 680 that’s really grabbing me. The colors are really interesting and the film has such a dreamy look. I’ve gotten a lot of strong feedback from viewers about the images.

5) What are your favorite subjects to photograph?

Definitely models at this point, I do a combination of clothed and nude work with them. I think of my work as portraiture, the goal is to capture something honest about the subject.

I used to love taking my Polaroids out for walks in the neighborhood but I’ve had to pretty much cut that out. I shoot a lot of film in my work with the models and that’s all I can afford.

6) Tell us about a project you’re working on.

I’m currently shooting a series with models on the Image Softtone film that I hope will become my first book. They’re very minimal images shot in a bare room, just a bed with white sheets and some white walls. The idea is to put the focus on the subjects without a lot of distracting elements. I’m hoping the book will happen this year and that I can get the images exhibited in some galleries.

I have some ideas for other projects when that one is done. I’d like to shoot in some new locations, more outdoors.

7) Who are your favorite photographers, instant or otherwise?

Some of the better known photographers that have influenced me are Sally Mann, Diane Arbus, Stephen Shore, Larry Sultan and Todd Hido. Sometimes those influences aren’t very direct. I think my work comes from a very different place than Arbus’s did, for example, my work is more about beauty. But there’s such a strong voice behind her images, they’re so compelling. That’s something all of those photographers have in common, a strong voice and a passion for making images.

Of the people shooting instant film now my favorite is probably Neil Krug. His work is lovely. And I’m influenced by many photographers every day through Tumblr. I love Corwin Prescott’s work, and there’s a brilliant guy from Germany named Hannes Caspar, I found him on Flickr a few years ago. Seeing the new work those people put out constantly challenges me to keep growing and improving.

8) If you could take a photo of anyone or anything what would it be?

Right now models are the first people who come to mind. Lara Stone and Kate Moss are at the top of the dream list. In terms of a more realistic wish list, I’ve actually been very fortunate, I’ve been able to work with a lot of the art models that I admire. A lot of them really love working with instant film, that has definitely helped.

I’ve also met some pretty amazing painters who like my work, people like Audrey Kawasaki, Amy Sol, Mandy Tsung, Chamaine Olivia, and Joshua Petker. I really admire people who can draw or paint well, and I’ve wanted for a while to do some sort of a series of portraits of artists. So maybe I can make that happen in the future.

About Rich

I’m from Portland, Oregon. I’ve been photographing models for three years, and other subjects before that. Besides instant film I shoot medium format film, sometimes with toy cameras, and some digital images. I’m very active on Instagram.

Thanks to Rich for taking part in 8 Exposures! You can follow him on Twitter and Instagram. His username for both is @richburroughs.

No. 609

8 Exposures...with Alan Marcheselli

Patrick Tobin, | 1412 days ago

Ciao, friends! Welcome back to 8 Exposures, our popular instant film Q&A series. This week, we are happy to bring you Italian photographer Alan Marcheselli

1) What kind of Polaroid camera(s) do you use?

I own more or less 200 Polaroid cameras, and depending on what I need, I choose the more useful, but my favourites are a silver One 600, an SX-70 Model 2 and a Spectra AF coming from a police CSI kit.

2) Why do you like instant photography?

I like it because of the size, the vintage/POP feelings, the different cameras and moreover I love the possibility to realize unrepeatable pictures.

3) What is your earliest memory of instant film?

I was three years old and my uncle shot some pictures of me with a Spirit 600 CL while on holiday. I fell in love with that system that gave the possibility to look immediately at the picture. Now, 37 years later, that pictures and that camera are still in my studio.

4) What’s your favorite Impossible film type?

AARRRGHH are you sure I have to choose only one? I quite like them all, from the first generation till the new one. Every film has its own character and application. I shoot principally with PX 70, PX 680 and PZ 600.

5) What are your favorite subjects to photograph?

I don’t have a favourite subject. First comes the project, the idea, then I choose the right subject to realize it, it could be a woman, a chair or a landscape.

6) Tell us about a project you’re working on.

At present I’m working on a project based onto female models self perception, tryng to expose the frailty that it’s hidden behind the beauty they share.

7) Who are your favorite photographers, instant or otherwise?

I grew up with some books of Andy Warhol which included lots of polaroids, so my first photographic love is him. Then I discovered Nobuioshi Araki and the Italian Maestro Maurizio Galimberti. These are my favorite photographers.

8) If you could take a photo of anyone or anything what would it be?

If I can realize a wish I’d like to take a photo of Madonna. During my lifetime I have seen this artist involved in many different art forms, but never in instant photography. In any case my bigger desire is to shoot with the 20 X 24” camera. This would be a nice challenge.

About Alan

Alan is from Sassuolo Italy. After 22 years of work as interior designer and marketing director in 2010, he has now dedicated his life to instant photgraphy.

No. 603

8 Exposures...with Caleb Jenkins

Patrick Tobin, | 1416 days ago

Welcome back to 8 Exposures, our popular instant film Q&A series. This entry focuses on Virginia photographer Caleb Jenkins

1) What kind of Polaroid camera(s) do you use?

As of now I have a single SX-70 Sears Special with the original skin, two 600 cameras, two Spectra cameras and one 420 Land Camera. Among those, my SX-70 is my favorite and most used. I love the history and pop culture behind the SX-70 camera and how vintage and iconic it is. I’m a big fan of the 70s, so my SX-70 is a perfect fit for me.

2) Why do you like instant photography?

Seeing as this question has been answered many times before me it’s quite hard to sum up an answer that isn’t anywhere near cliche. I guess I’ll have to go ahead and conform to all other answers, because instant photography is simply magical. I love that with each image I take, it’s the only image that will ever look that way. It’s truly a single edition. One main reason that I’ve been pulled into instant photography is that I feel it brings me back to reality. Having grown up in a digitally prosperous generation that knows no such thing as simplicity I find it refreshing to be a part of something that doesn’t need wifi or cables to work. And as simple as it is, it’s challenging at the same time. I hate that digital photography seems so clean and way too easy to take. If I ended this section right there then I’d be leaving out a major reason. Without a doubt, the Impossible and instant photography community is the greatest community to be a part of. Everyone is helpful, friendly and just easy to get along with. I’ve made numerous friends through instant photography that otherwise I would have never known, and I thank instant photography for that. Overall, the feelings I get from instant photography are almost impossible to put into words, but as we all know, nothing is impossible.

3) What is your earliest memory of instant film?

Unlike most people, I grew up in a household that was lacking a Polaroid. The only camera I can really remember growing up was a big autofocus Nikon SLR.

4) What’s your favorite Impossible film type?

When I entered the world of Impossible film I started shooting PX 70, so that has to be one of my all-time favorites. However, since the release of the COOL film line that’s been the only film in my SX-70. I’ve noticed though that my tastes in film change with each season. In late autumn and throughout winter, Silver Shade seems to suit my style of photos and then during spring, summer, and early autumn, Color Shade reigns supreme in capturing the wonderful colors and tones that appear in those months.

5) What are your favorite subjects to photograph?

I’ll take a photo of anything that I think would look great once captured. However, I’ve come to find out that I enjoy taking macro photos and photos of vintage things of all sorts more than anything, no matter the subject. When I’m not taking macro photos I love to walk around my hometown or nearby cities and search for vintage industrial buildings or industrial-related things that are turning into modern ruins.

6) Tell us about a project you’re working on.

Back in April I started a project using PX 70 and PX 70 COOL film entitled “Growth”. It chronicles the growth of a garden from start to finish during a time when saving money by means of having a garden is needed more than ever. It was the first garden we tended to since I was a little kid and being older now it was truly a learning experience for me. Before starting the project I had already began using Impossible film, but I knew right away that instant film, more specifically Impossible film, was the correct choice to document the experience. I love how Impossible film and growing a garden connect on so many levels. They both are very unpredictable and many things are out of the hands of the beholder. For example, I have no control over whether or not my photo will develop correctly and I also have no control over the weather itself. Striving to document our first garden in years not only taught me about what I need to know to survive, but I gained valuable knowledge on using my SX-70 and Impossible film. I truly realized that with both gardening and documentation with Impossible film that I must deal with what is handed to me and make decisions based on previous encounters and what is trying to be achieved. That’s what I wanted to achieve with this project. I didn’t want it to just be photos, I wanted it to be an overall learning experience for myself and hopefully others, and I feel I achieved that. As of right now, I’m expecting my last photo of the series to be in the middle of October, but that’s not set in stone.

7) Who are your favorite photographers, instant or otherwise?

After much consideration, I’ve found that there really aren’t any well-known photographers that are my favorites. I mean don’t get me wrong, I love all of Ansel Adams’ and Andy Warhol’s work along with all of the original Magnum Photographers and LIFE photographers, but if I really had to chose, I’d say that my parents and ancestors who had access to a camera are my favorite photographers. I’ve came to this conclusion, because being able to see family that were way before my time is important in seeing the differences of times between myself and past relatives. Also, it’s immensely important to me to have photos of myself when I was young and being able to look back at those photos in years to come. In addition to the personal importance of photos documenting myself and family, my inspiration for photography lies in previously-stated photographers and photographs, but also the instant film community. The photos I see everyday from the Flickr and Twitter community are getting more amazing as the days go on. The feedback and general conversations I have regularly with fellow twitter folks are truly inspirational to me. It’s yet another part of photography that I thoroughly enjoy.

8) If you could take a photo of anyone or anything what would it be?

I’ve always wanted to travel across the whole of Europe. I’m especially drawn toward ruins both ancient and new in the UK, but what I’d really love to do is travel across all of Europe with an unlimited supply of Impossible film and capture the various cultures and landscapes I encounter while there. I’m obsessed with the idea of shooting photography like this as fine art, but more importantly as documentation and ways to preserve memories, and what better way than to preserve those memories with Impossible film.

About Caleb

Since the start, shooting Impossible Film has become a full time love affair. I have goals of incorporating film and instant film back into people’s everyday lives.

Thank you to Caleb for taking part in 8 Exposures! You can follow him on Twitter at @Caleb_Jenkins.

No. 599

8 Exposures...with Claire Oring

Patrick Tobin, | 1419 days ago

Warmest greetings to you, Impossible friends! Welcome back to 8 Exposures, our instant film Q&A series. Our star this week is Los Angeles-based photographer Claire Oring

1) What kind of Polaroid camera(s) do you use?

I use a regular Polaroid 600 One Step and a Polaroid Spectra. I also just got an old Land Camera I’m refurbishing.

2) Why do you like instant photography?

I love watching all the colors and textures bloom in the palm of my hand.

3) What is your earliest memory of instant film?

I started using instant film when I was 15 and my dad gave me his old camera. I have a box under my bed with hundreds of Polaroids I took in high school.

4) What’s your favorite Impossible film type?

I loved the PX 680 Gold Frame color shade because it was fancy.

5) What are your favorite subjects to photograph?

Nature, magic, adventure, folklore, and young ladies. Almost all my work is some combination of those elements with a hint of mystery.

6) Tell us about a project you’re working on.

I was savoring the idea of my mermaid series Fin for months and now it finally exists. I’ve been working on a collaboration with Billabong Australia and Billabong USA over the past six months. My illustrations and photos are on their clothing and everything is just about to come out. I get to shoot creative photos all the clothes this month. Dream come true!

7) Who are your favorite photographers, instant or otherwise?

I probably look up to classical painters more than photographers. I love the stories and symbolism they incorporate in each work of art. When looking for inspiration I go to museums and take notes on the back stories from my favorite paintings.

8) If you could take a photo of anyone or anything what would it be?

A centaur. I have yet to figure that one out.

About Claire

I’m a 23-year-old photographer from Los Angeles with an overactive imagination and a burning love for instant film.

Thank you to Claire for taking part in 8 Exposures! Be sure to visit her website,
www.claireoring.com and follow her on Twitter at @Claire_Oring.

No. 594

8 Exposures...with Tim Logan

Patrick Tobin, | 1423 days ago

Hello again, friends, and welcome back to 8 Exposures, our popular instant film Q&A series. This week, we are happy to bring you marketing director and photographer Tim Logan

1) What kind of Polaroid camera(s) do you use?

Most of the time I use an SX-70 or SX-70 sonar. I have a variety of other Polaroid cameras and backs as well, though, and will often use one of those. It’s not uncommon to see me out with a Polaroid Spectra, Polaroid 250 or my Graflex Crown Graphic with a Polaroid 545 or 550 back. I enjoy shooting as many instant film formats as I can get my hands on so I tend to have a lot of different cameras with me at any given time.

2) Why do you like instant photography?

As strange as it may sound, one of the biggest reasons I enjoy instant photography is because of what it has taught me – Patience. Whether you are shooting with Impossible’s films or some the remaining expired Polaroid stock you really need to be much more mindful of how you work. It’s become very easy to shoot in excess because of digital technology, but, because I don’t want to waste a single frame of instant film I’ve really learned to slow down and take more into consideration before I release the shutter. Ultimately, I think that lesson has made me a better photographer regardless of the format I’m shooting.

Outside of that, I just think this is a really exciting time to be involved in instant photography. I was amazed when I read the opening chapters of From Polaroid To Impossible. So many great artists were involved in the early stages of Polaroid. Their work, images and experimentation with Polaroid film became iconic. They were the Pioneers, and, in a way, they were the ones who helped shape Polaroid into what it eventually became. I think as an instant photographer it’s very exciting to be a part of something similar with The Impossible Project. As they continue to grow and develop the new generation of instant film we are lucky enough to be involved and a part of their story.

3) What is your earliest memory of instant film?

Unfortunately, I am one of those photographers who came late to Instant film. Growing up I wasn’t really around photography much. Except for some 35mm film and a couple disposable cameras used to shoot childhood birthday parties or family vacations there weren’t a lot of cameras around. I didn’t know anyone who owned a Polaroid camera and I never shot any of the original Polaroid films until long after they had stopped producing them. Now, I often scramble to find as many of the original film types as possible just so that I can experience them once before they’re gone. It’s funny to find myself missing something that I’ve never known, but I continue to watch film stocks disappear or be discontinued just as I am expanding further into film photography. I think it’s unfortunate for all young photographers and I think it’s just another reason why companies like The Impossible Project are so important.

4) What’s your favorite Impossible film type?

Currently, and for very different reasons, I think it’s a toss up between the PX 100 film and the PX 600 Black Frame Poor Pod. I think the PX 100 has been one of the sharpest and most consistent films from Impossible. It has great tones, is quick to develop and I’m always confident in what my end result is going to be. The PX 600 Poor Pod on the other hand, is a film that I love because of its lack of consistency. The undeveloped divots and occasional brown streaking throughout the film are unpredictable and have made for some of my most unexpectedly beautiful photos.

Considering the exciting advancements to the opacification layer of the new PX 680 and PX 70 test films though…I think there are some really great Impossible films on the horizon and that my answer to this question will soon change.

5) What are your favorite subjects to photograph?

No matter what format I’m working in I would almost always choose to shoot a person over anything else. I find the experience of working with a person rewarding and, personally, I find that photographs with people are more interesting. I think the human element creates emotions and personality that you can’t get in a lot of other places. Of course, it’s not always easy to find someone to shoot with, so, I have shot my fair share of other things over the years. And really, even if I do prefer to photograph people, I love photography so much that I could never limit myself to just a single focus. So… I guess my favorite subject to photograph is the one that is current.

6) Tell us about a project you’re working on.

I’m currently working alongside two close friends and fellow artists in an effort to bring about a large, all-analog photography festival here to Cleveland Ohio in 2013. I can’t give out too many details of the event just yet, but if all goes as planned you will be hearing more about that event soon.

7) Who are your favorite photographers, instant or otherwise?

Choosing a few favorite photographers is a very difficult task for me. I look at so many photos in the course of a week and draw inspiration from so many different styles that it’s hard for me to pinpoint favorites. I have always been a huge fan of Helmut Newton for his style of photography, his approach to art and his ability to live up to his own expectations over the expectations of those he was working for. I find the work of Sally Mann to be truly beautiful and inspiring in the face of controversy early in her career and think that her later work is a great example of how an artist can infuse their beliefs and explorations into a piece of art. I admire Richard Avedon for his accomplishments, his simplicity and the unbelievable ease in which he directs his talent. And then, more recently, I have been admiring the work of Jan Scholz, a more current and perhaps lesser known film photographer, because of the depth and emotion he get’s his models to convey and because of how beautifully he uses natural, available locations and light in his work.

8) If you could take a photo of anyone or anything what would it be?

I love Americana. I’ve always been nostalgic and enjoyed the small, fading away places that you happen across when you take the less-traveled route. Little town squares, the unchanged amusement park and carnival-like towns like Coney Island are my favorite kinds of places to spend the day and capture on film. I’d be happy to travel the country some day photographing those little places that time has forgot before they all disappear for good.

About Tim

I am a selt-taught, slightly obsessed, photographic hobbyist from Cleveland, Ohio. I enjoy cycling, my three cats, black coffee, my lady-friend, growing a beard, and of course, all things photography. In my free time I work with a full-service marketing agency as an Associate Creative Director for an internal production studio.

To see more of Tim’s photography, please visit his photo blog and his Flickr photostream. You can also follow him on Twitter at @StudioTim.

No. 588

8 Exposures...with Patrick Winfield

Patrick Tobin, | 1430 days ago

Hi there, friends. Welcome back to 8 Exposures, our popular instant film Q&A series. This week, we’re happy to bring you creative wizard and all-arounnd nice guy Patrick Winfield

1) What kind of Polaroid camera(s) do you use?

I currently am using the Macro 5 SLR, Spectra and the SX-70.

2) Why do you like instant photography?

The “Thing-ness” of it. That the photo is a direct object of a memory – a tangible memory that can be held immediately and further manipulated as it develops or ‘lives on‘… that quality of being an instant artifact which can be further manipulated to play up the materiality of the medium is what attracts me to the film.

3) What is your earliest memory of instant film?

It was a picture of a dead man. Then the film was sucked back into the camera and the whole time I took pictures of things with my polaroid and tattooed myself to help figure out what happened in my life since I had some sort of amnesia…or was that the plot of Memento?

4) What’s your favorite Impossible film type?

I love them all – total Sophie’s Choice…whichever film fits into any camera I am using. I have been shooting with PX 70 Color Shade COOL and PZ 680 COOL

5) What are your favorite subjects to photograph?

My muse, the lovely Laura. I also have a fondness for shadows of objects, clouds, animals and anything in motion.

6) Tell us about a project you’re working on.

I am working on a series of composites called The Subway Series. Armed with a Macro 5 SLR camera and as much PZ 680 film as I could carry, I traveled far and wide through the New York City subway system photographing billboards and adverts from Manhattan to Brooklyn and created new, unique portraits using bits and pieces from all of them. I have been stopped in action by several cops, MTA employees and straphangers as well, all wondering what I am doing with this crazy camera…the Macro 5 demands attention.

7) Who are your favorite photographers, instant or otherwise?

Sally Man, Lucas Samras and David Hockney. And every photographer I have seen on this blog and various sites…amazing talent.

8) If you could take a photo of anyone or anything what would it be?

It would most definitely be a 20×24 piece composite of my muse, using the 20×24 camera/film…when you guys make it, that is.

About Patrick

I am from Brooklyn, New York. I do a lot of things… I am a graphic designer by profession and when I’m not pushing pixels on the screen I am documenting all the bags in trees we leave behind http://bagsintrees.tumblr.com/ & photographing your dogs and pets http://dogsarecoolpeople.tumblr.com/ . I recently discovered the pleasure that is Seltzer water and have 2 bonsai trees.

To see more of Patrick’s work, please visit his Facebook page.

No. 585

8 Exposures...with Meghan Davidson

Patrick Tobin, | 1433 days ago

Greetings from Impossible! Welcome back to 8 Exposures, our ongoing instant film Q&A series. This week, we’re happy to bring you Nebraska college professor and photographer Meghan Davidson

1) What kind of Polaroid camera(s) do you use?

Most often, I shoot with my SX-70. I love the depth of field that camera allows and the way you can really select the focus. I also love shooting with the Spectra for self-portraits and double exposures, and I have a Polaroid 250 that I need to spend more quality time with. And, I’m really hoping to get my hands on an SLR 680 some day.

2) Why do you like instant photography?

I have a special affection for film, especially instant film. I love when I put a pack in my Polaroid and close the film door, that the camera immediately comes to life, clicking and whirring and shooting out the dark slide. Instant film feels so timeless, so classic to me. There’s simply a magical quality about shooting with it. Because of the limited number of frames, each click of the shutter is special. And that makes me slow down. Instant film helps me be thoughtful and selective in what, when, and how I shoot. There is a deliberate-ness that comes with shooting this film. For me, I feel a wholly different experience when I am shooting with instant film compared to when I shoot digitally. When I’m out with my Polaroid cameras, I find the time to be contemplative. Meditative.

Along with that meditative process, shooting with instant film feels like allowing for the imperfect. It’s like saying “yes” to the flaws, to the not-so-spot-on composition, to the under- or over-exposure. When I’m shooting with instant film, I’m not shooting 20 photographs of the same vintage car to get the shot “just so.” I’m taking my time, looking through my viewfinder composing and re-composing. And then when I feel ready, I click the shutter, usually just once. And I hope for the best. Sometimes the photograph is just what I had in my mind’s eye, and sometimes, many times, it’s not. And that’s all right with me. Shooting with instant film takes practice. And that practice means accepting that imperfections are part of the process — seeing that those imperfections are okay, that they are what make that very image unique and special. It’s finding that the imperfections are what make the photo, actually, quite perfect. I feel it’s all quite metaphorical.

3) What is your earliest memory of instant film?

I remember my father having an SX-70 when I was a child, and that it was the camera he used to take my picture on first days of school, my birthday, and falling asleep while waiting up for Santa. I clearly remember that tan leather camera, and that it folded closed! I don’t have many photographs of myself as a child, but the bulk of those I have are all Polaroid images.

4) What’s your favorite Impossible film type?

Currently, my favorite Impossible film is the PX 70 Cool. And I love the PX 100 Silver Shade.

5) What are your favorite subjects to photograph?

I really enjoy shooting photographs that feel vintage, nostalgic, and a bit timeless. I am drawn to objects, scenes, or vignettes that elicit a sentimentality.

6) Tell us about a project you’re working on.

I’m currently about 1/3 of the way through a 365 photography project. This is the first 365 project I’ve ever done, and I’m enjoying it a great deal (so far). It’s a real learning experience in so many ways and I’m grateful that I’ve taken it on. After this first 365 is completed, I’d really love to do an Impossible 365 project. That might require a benefactor to make that happen, though!

7) Who are your favorite photographers, instant or otherwise?

I admire the work of so many photographers, both instant and digital shooters. In terms of instant photographers, I’m particularly inspired by the work of Andrea Corrona Jenkins and Chloe Aftel. Andrea’s point of view and love of all things vintage really speaks to me. Her work makes me feel happy. In a very different style, I think Chloe is a master at portraits using instant film. I would like to work on honing my skills with portrait photography and would love to learn from Chloe. In addition to those two remarkable women, I find so much inspiration and enjoy the work of the online Impossible community — Kim Oberski, Sarah Kirkman, Jake Messenger, Ludwig West, Caballos Blancos, and on and on I could go. In terms of photographers more broadly, I find so much inspiration in the self-portrait work of both Meredith Winn and Kristin Zecchinelli, and I adore the work of Kirstin McKee.

8) If you could take a photo of anyone or anything what would it be?

That’s a tough question because I can’t think of many things or people or places I don’t want to photograph. But my current fantasy is to shoot a dinner or event put on by Kinfolk Magazine. That would be amazing. Their whole aesthetic, vibe, and values all really attract me. I think one of their events would look incredible on instant film.

About Meghan

I’m originally from Baltimore, Maryland, but currently live in Lincoln, Nebraska where I am a professor at the University of Nebraska. I am a psychologist and spend my work time researching, teaching, and conducting therapy. I love to fill my free time with photography and travel, and am focusing on using photography to build a creative life.

To see more of Meghan’s work, please visit her Flickr photostream. You can also follow her on Twitter at @meghandavidson.
@meghandavidson

No. 579

8 Exposures...with Amanda Mason

Patrick Tobin, | 1437 days ago

Welcome back to 8 Exposures, our popular instant film Q&A series. This week, we are happy to bring you Australian designer and photographer Amanda Mason

1) What kind of Polaroid camera(s) do you use?

I primarily use my folding SX-70 original and an SLR 680. If I was onboard a sinking ship and had to start throwing all my cameras overboard, I would go down with these two. I think they are design masterpieces capable of producing simply lovely images.

2) Why do you like instant photography?

I adore the dreamlike nature of the film. All instant film creates a nostalgic, other-worldly, soft toned patina. It is a dreamy little world that I want to live in all the time. Everytime I shoot instant film I am drawn into another dimension straight away. Everytime I see an instant photograph I feel like I am looking at a memory. Of course having the photograph in your hands in a matter of minutes is quite nice too.

3) What is your earliest memory of instant film?

My earliest memory of instant film is my grandmothers Polaroid camera. As kids we were absolutely fascinated by integral film, the magic of it all. She used that camera as her everyday camera, we still have those Polaroids in our family album. I bought my first Polaroid camera when I was 16. I paid $5 at a flea market for an EE 100 which i still have. I am now going to pass on that magic to my children.

4) What’s your favorite Impossible film type?

My favourite Impossible films would probably be PX 70 Push for its gorgeous pink tones, PX 600 Silver Shade UV+ for its lovely black and white tones and PX 680 Color Shade for its wonderfully nostalgic colours.
It is actually hard to pick a favourite though, they all offer a different quality that suits particular subjects or moods.

5) What are your favorite subjects to photograph?

I love to create and shoot little scenarios, little whimsical worlds which express something I am feeling or dreaming about. They are usually a bit twisted or distorted and the quality of instant film really enhances this.

6) Tell us about a project you’re working on.

I am currently working on having an exhibition of Polaroids in Sydney. I am also working on a new series of photographs of some pretty twisted specimens that I have created.
An ongoing project is my Polaroid cushions. I began printing my polaroid images onto fabric, and creating cushions from them. I started doing it for myself as I wanted a few around the house, but then they have become quite popular, so I am constantly making these now to sell to people and on Etsy.

7) Who are your favorite photographers, instant or otherwise?

I am constantly amazed and fall in love with the work of Robert and Shana Parke-Harrison. Exquisitely beautiful, rich, narrative focused and creative work that inspires me greatly.

There are so many inspiring instant photographers, and you only need to participate in Roid Week to be blown away by all the instant talent, but I guess my all time favourites are Dan Ryan, The Gentleman Amateur, Ludwig West and Neil Krug, who always seem tell such a story with their images.

8) If you could take a photo of anyone or anything what would it be?

The extinct (or is it?) Tasmanian Tiger.

About Amanda

I am a freelance photographer and designer from Sydney, Australia.

To see more of Amanda’s photography, please visit her Flickr photostream. You can also follow her on Twitter at @amamason.

No. 568

8 Exposures...with Dustin Yager

Patrick Tobin, | 1444 days ago

Hello, instant film lovers, and welcome back to 8 Exposures, our popular analog Q&A series. This week the star is our good friend, Dustin Yager

1) What kind of Polaroid camera(s) do you use?

I have a decent collection of Polaroid cameras but my main cameras are an SX-70 (whichever one is working at the time) and a modified 450 Land Camera. I am currently working on a new pack film mod that i am looking forward to.

2) Why do you like instant photography?

Everyone who sees me shoot instant film asks me this question and I never have a standard answer for it. I love the uniqueness and individuality of every shot. I love that it’s not easily replicated and that your instant shot is a capture of that moment in time, whatever it may be. I love that there is an unknown element with every instant photography shot and there are no “do overs.” Digital photography just feels cold and too perfect to me sometimes and I love the softness and dreamlike quality that instant film has. I also feel that since i have been shooting instant film, it has made me a better photographer and made me think of the shot more before and during the process.

3) What is your earliest memory of instant film?

I’m sure there were family snapshots on instant film growing up but I don’t really have any memories of these. The earliest current memory I have is when my girlfriend and I started dating about 4 years ago. She pulled out a Polaroid camera and was talking about the instant photography she had been doing. She let me take a couple of shots with her film and I was hook shortly after this. My father taught me photography when I was younger but instant film gave me a whole different way of looking at photography and the world.

4) What’s your favorite Impossible film type?

My favorite has been PX 680 First Flush. I have had some amazing results with this film and some of my favorite shots have been on PX 680 FF. The new PX 70 batch is fantastic as well and the tones of PX 600 UV+ lend well to portraits (especially the Black Frame film).

5) What are your favorite subjects to photograph?

I have been trying to take more portraits in my work and I like to try and capture everyday moments that could be anywhere in any time really. The little moments that we take for granted and pass us by before we realize they are gone. On instant film, I try to capture pieces of life that anyone can relate to and make you feel like you could be right there in that moment. I have to say that my girlfriend is my muse; she started me in instant photography and is my most willing subject. She is beautiful and ends up in so many of my photos.

6) Tell us about a project you’re working on.

The last few years, I have been taking instant film shots on my vacations to Martha’s Vineyard. I have tried to capture the beauty of the island and would like to try to put some of these shots together in the future for a book. I also have an ongoing series I have been doing called “Night Visions.” These are double exposure shots taken with an SX-70 that include a night scene and a portrait on Impossible films.

7) Who are your favorite photographers, instant or otherwise?

I have always been a big fan of Chuck Close, his painting and photography. Like many other people have stated, the many talented instant enthusiasts in the Flickr communities are a constant inspiration. I’ve had the pleasure to meet and even shoot with some of these people and they have all been the nicest people. It’s great to meet people you admire on Flickr and spend an afternoon geeking out about instant photography.

8) If you could take a photo of anyone or anything what would it be?

Right now I would have to say the Eiffel Tower, just because it would mean that I have been to Paris. Actually I would just like to take photos from around the streets of Paris.

About Dustin

I currently live in Connecticut and enjoy traveling around New England and to NYC with my Polaroid cameras. I work in the counseling field and occasionally in my spare time I can be found DJing weddings for indie kids.

No. 565

8 Exposures...with Jessica Shimek

Patrick Tobin, | 1447 days ago

Hello, Impossible friends! Welcome back to 8 Exposures, our instant film Q&A series. This week, we bring you Minnesota artist and photographer Jessica Shimek

1) What Polaroid cameras do you use?

A Polaroid SX-70, A Polaroid Spirit 600, a 240 Land Camera and a Polaroid back on my Hasselblad 501c/m.

2) Why do you like instant photography?

Every photography medium has a different feeling and portrays a different mood. I love the mood that instant photography gives me. It is warm and sometimes a bit faded…this will sound cheesy, but I feel like each image is a tangible bit of a memory.

3) What is your earliest memory of instant film?

I don’t know that I have an earliest memory that I can really remember. Polaroids and instant film were just always there. My parents had a Polaroid 600 camera and took tons of photos of me when I was younger. I grew up with it. It was never not a thing. I don’t remember the first time I watched an instant photo develop, but I remember that it was magical every time.

4) What is your favorite Impossible type film?

Hands down, the new Cool film. I’m seriously in love with everything about that film. My second favorite is the Black Frame PX 600 film. That is my favorite monochrome film produced by Impossible.

5) What are your favorite subjects to photograph?

Mostly, I just photograph life. I have a camera with me all the time. I photograph where I am, I go on photo walks and photograph what I find. I love photographing architecture, and old run down buildings, and empty prairies. I adore night photography and photographing the lights wherever I am. Now that I feel more in sync with my SX-70, I plan to experiment with more long exposures using it. Stay tuned!

6) Tell us about a project you are working on

Digital dreams of life is a series I have been working on for quite awhile now, and I don’t think I’m anywhere close to finishing yet. Using my film images, I layer them together in Photoshop and create different made-up worlds and stories. Recently, I have been using many more instant Impossible images in my compilations. I think a lot of this project comes from being a science fiction geek and being married to one. I imagine what a place might look like through augmented reality goggles, if you could see its history and future together, or what a place wants to be.

7) Who are your favorite photographers, instant or otherwise?

Look through the list of people I follow on Twitter. I follow so many amazing and inspiring photographers, and there are too many of them to list here! Laura Migliorino, Cate Vermeland, Gary Hallman and Bruce Charlsworth were all great influences to me during my college years, and still are. Cindy Sherman, Diane Arbus, Dorothea Lange, and so many more.

8) If you could take a photo of anyone or anything, what would it be?

I think my answer to this question could change daily! My short list today is: the set and cast of Doctor Who, Australia, London, Berlin, and outer space (thanks to Mars Curiosity).

About Jessica

I am a Minnesota girl. I have spent this part of my life living just outside of Minneapolis, creating art, taking photographs, and working at my parents’ restaurant in between.

To see more of Jessica’s work, please visit her Flickr photostream. You can also follow her on Twitter at @Moonsweetie.

No. 558

8 Exposures...with Andrea Tonellotto

Patrick Tobin, | 1451 days ago

Ciao, Impossibles! Welcome back to 8 Exposures, our instant film question & answer series. This week’s entry focuses on Italian photographer Andrea Tonellotto

1) What kind of Polaroid camera(s) do you use?

By now, I’m making a collection!! I use three SX-70s, two of which are the original model (my favorite), an SLR 680, a Spectra system, a 1000 and, recently, I bought a 600 SE, with which I’m starting to become confident.

2) Why do you like instant photography?

At first the tones and colors made me mad for the Artistic TZ’s pastel tones, but now i’m in love with last impossible PX 70 12\11 batch’s colors, wonderful!! Secondly, for the fact that I have the result immediately, after a few minutes, and for an impatient man like me, it’s very important. Paradoxically, altough a dated method, it’s faster than digital photography. Dear old Edwin Land was really too “advanced.” Last, there is a “technical” reason…I like to take photos in balance between real life and an abstract world, with subjects born of imagination. Instant film is an absolutely real and tangible material.

3) What is your earliest memory of instant film?

Me and my sister’s photo, when we were children. I remember very well, when my father took our photos, our astonishment to watch those images to develop little by little…true magic. Even now i’m very fascinated, and i really hope Impossible reproduces films that do not need to be protected from light, but can just be expelled from the camera, so that we can enjoy this kind of show.

4) What’s your favorite Impossible film type?

For my jobs, PX 70 12/11 has the best colors, although i have to say some of first PX 680 had wonderful colors. I still have not tried the “Cool” films, but what I’ve seen so far is very good.

5) What are your favorite subjects to photograph?

As you can guess from my photos, my favourite subjects are landscapes and urban details. I like to go around with my Polaroid to find modern building works with strict lines, few frills, in which light, shadows and colors make linear shapes i can play with. Then I like to take photos of my daughter Margherita, but I keep this kind of photo for me, of course.

6) Tell us about a project you’re working on.

“Nobody. Is there anybody out there?” is a project I’m working on, and some of these photos are the photos I submitted for 8 Exposures. My intention is to represent an ideal city, with houses, factories, recreation spaces, shops, a city witout name: the City.

The search of structures dedicated to man, absence of the man as an actor, but his presence as a designer, as a user. Lights, shadows, geometric and abstract figures. My intention is to propose a world that seems unreal and, as I said, just the fact that instant cameras and instant films get back to reality. It’s a work in progress, made in different parts: any part is a mini project on its own that can be shown alone…I hope to achieve my intention!

7) Who are your favorite photographers, instant or otherwise?

There are many photographers I like. I want to mention some Italian photographers first: For instant film, Marco Barbon is the photographer that I prefer now. If you don’t know his work, you can see “asmara dream”, “casablanca”, and “cronotropie”. They are surprising. For general photography, I love all Luigi Ghirri’s work. I like Giovanni Chiaromonte and Marco Zanta too. They produce high quality works.

8) If you could take a photo of anyone or anything what would it be?

At the moment, to expand my “Nobody. Is there anybody out there?” work, I’d like very much to come back to take photos in North Ireland, especially Belfast. A place I never went, but i feel inspired by, is Rotterdam in the Netherlands; one of my next goals. Anyway, all North Europe and its modern architecture, often hazardous, stimulates my imagination and my wanderlust.

About Andrea

I’m 37 years old. I live in Piazzola Sul Brenta, near Padova in Italy. I began to take photos with a Leica, then I used medium format, to get to instant film’s magic. I got married to Chiara and I have a beatiful child, 6 years old, called Margherita. Another great passion of mine is rugby.

To see more of Andrea’s work, visit his website at www.andreatonellotto.com/

No. 555

8 Exposures...with Brian Green

Patrick Tobin, | 1453 days ago

Hello, friends! Welcome back to 8 Exposures, our popular instant film Q&A series. This week, we present to you South Carolina photographer Brian Green

1) What kind of Polaroid camera(s) do you use?

What I usually have on me at a basic shoot are two Mamiya RB67s with Polaroid pack film backs: one with a 180mm lens and one a 90mm, a Polaroid Colorpack, and an SX-70 Sonar. I have around 30 cameras in my collection but those are my main ones that get used daily.

2) Why do you like instant photography?

The instant aspect of course; I am a person who likes to put work out as it’s created so waiting on developing film would slow that down a little. Also in my opinion nothing comes close to the colors and feel the instant film gives.

3) What is your earliest memory of instant film?

My mom has always been artistic, from painting, to wood work to photography so she introduced me to it at an early age and it has always had a soft spot in my heart some of the only photos I have of my father are on Polaroid 600 film.

4) What’s your favorite Impossible film type?

My favorite is PX 70 Color Shade, but I have not seen any film from Impossible that I could say that I dislike. I am looking forward to the 8×10 film as well.

5) What are your favorite subjects to photograph?

Though I try not to limit myself I always seem to gravitate towards the nude body and rural landscape and in most cases a combination of the two put together.

6) Tell us about a project you’re working on.

At the moment I have been busy at work taking apart little SX-70 cameras working on building an SX-70 backpack for my Mamiya. I pretty much have most of my concept figured out and will begin cutting parts for it this week.

7) Who are your favorite photographers, instant or otherwise?

Another blessing would be the internet always finding new people on a daily basis so there would be a lot to name but some photographers whose work I really enjoy would have to be J.Caldwell, Mitchell Davis and Megan Kathleen. So many others of course but I browse through those people’s work regularly.

8) If you could take a photo of anyone or anything what would it be?

I have always wanted to travel to Iceland and shoot so that and a combination of the locals there naked on hillsides would pretty much make a trip there complete in my book.

About Me

I am currently based out of South Carolina but i am always traveling so who knows where i will end up next. Hopefully in a camper on the open road and a suitcase full of film.

To see more of Brian’s photography, visit seeyouinsleep.com. You can also follow him on Twitter at @iambriangreen.

No. 549

8 Exposures...with Rachel Carrier

Patrick Tobin, | 1458 days ago

Welcome back to 8 Exposures, our popular instant film Q&A series. This week, we are happy to bring you DC-based photographer Rachel Carrier

1) What kind of Polaroid camera(s) do you use?

Almost always I am using an original model SX-70 that I picked up years ago at a thrift store. I also use an SX-70 model 2 from time to time and the Impulse camera for indoor/party shots where I’m not as worried about composing. I also have worked a lot on double exposures with my Spectra camera.

2) Why do you like instant photography?

I fell in love with Time Zero film a few years before it went out of production. I love the color contrast and saturation of the film and the fact that it often gave me unexpected results. I love Impossible film for the same reason. The colors are gorgeous and I actually love the light sensitivity of the film, it gives each shot its own aura.

3) What is your earliest memory of instant film?

Probably looking at photos in our family albums when I was a kid, so many of them were instant photos.

4) What’s your favorite Impossible film type?

I really loved the way the NIGO edition batch came out. Amazing, intense colors in the film and the colorful frames were also great.

5) What are your favorite subjects to photograph?

I love to bring my camera when I am traveling somewhere new. I get most of my inspiration from visiting a place for the first time. I also really love it when I can convince my friends to pose and getting a truly natural shot.

6) Tell us about a project you’re working on.

I’d really love to work more on taking photos of people and strangers. Sometimes I get too shy and miss out on a great shot – I’ve begun to compile a Polaroid Portrait Project for that reason.

7) Who are your favorite photographers, instant or otherwise?

When I first started digging around on Flickr for other Polaroid fanatics years ago I found and started following the work of Grant Hamilton, Whitney Johnson, Ritchard Ton, and Jon Madison, among others. I still love their work and am excited to see what new things they are doing with TIP film. Recently I’ve found Andrea aka Flickr user “girlhula” and I am loving her shots! Also, I have been following the Vivian Maier discovery – how exciting to find such a large body of amazing work from this woman! Philip-Lorca diCorcia is another amazing photographer that inspires me.

8) If you could take a photo of anyone or anything what would it be?

It would probably be the beautiful landscapes in New Zealand or Greece. Two places I’ve always wanted to go. Hawaii would be great too.

About Rachel

I currently live in Washington, D.C. but I have also lived in Boston and I grew up in Maryland. I work for the Alternative Weekly paper there and I spend a lot of my free time taking photos and thrifting!

Thanks to Rachel for taking part in 8 Exposures! You can follow her on Twitter at @racarrier.

No. 545

8 Exposures...with Benjamin Innocent

Patrick Tobin, | 1462 days ago

Greetings, instanteers, and welcome back to 8 Exposures, our instant film Q&A series. This week’s guest is a good friend of ours from the UK, all-around nice guy and brilliant photographer Benjamin Innocent

1) What kind of Polaroid camera(s) do you use?

I have a few instant cameras but have found that I gravitate to 3 that I use often: A Polaroid SLR 680, a Land 250 pack film camera (newly acquired) and an SX-70 Model 1. I find the SX-70 is my most frequently used camera; it was my first folding Polaroid and I adore it. Its design is genius, more a work of art.

2) Why do you like instant photography?

I am fairly new to instant film, however (and this may sound crass), I find this 40-50 year old technology absolutely blows my mind, it is magic! Taking each shot makes me a little giddy with a click, thud, whirr sound. I am very much self-taught/learnt from friends when it comes to taking photographs and I have found that instant photography is where I have settled; it resonates with how I approach making a picture. I love that it slows you down, when you press the shutter button you are committed; no deletes or retakes. The nervous wait to see the image and then you are left with the tangible element that is unique; physically holding an image, passing it round, sticking it up on a wall, giving that one copy away. Even the ritual of opening the smooth card box and loading the cartridge into the camera is absorbing…I am a little obsessed!

3) What is your earliest memory of instant film?

I was around 12 years old at a friend’s birthday party, her brother had a learning disability and wouldn’t talk to us but he kept asking her for a photo of us all. I still remember he had a 600 model. I remember our amazement as we gathered round and watched it develop, then to me it really was magic. I asked my parents for one but they dismissed it as too expensive. I guess it just burned away in the back of my mind, forgotten, until walking home from a night out i found a Polaroid in the road. It was of a car in an unknown street. Holding it I thought back to my 12-year-old self, that uniqueness of the one-off physical photograph. I wondered where that photo was now of us at the BBQ. I decided that I had waited long enough. By the time I got my grandparent’s old SX-70 1000 camera, the Impossible Project were nearly 2 years into existence. Thanks to Impossible, that little child in me has had the chance to use the materials that I never did when I was younger and yet when using it I feel its magic like I am that child still.

4) What’s your favorite Impossible film type?

A really difficult question as I hail each new Impossible film as my favourite! Each has its own qualities although I tend to use colour films more often. I do think that the chemistry of PX 680 Gold Frame with its gorgeous blue tones was awesome. The COOL film is stunning, the colour pop is so good and stability is outstanding. To be honest whichever film I feed my beloved Polaroid cameras I am just grateful Impossible exists to be able to use them.

5) What are your favorite subjects to photograph?

My easiest answer to this is anything. I love to try and capture the world around me, whether outside or in. I feel so much beauty is overlooked in the moments that surround all of us. I take one of my Polaroids most places and like to just walk with my camera listening to music until something grabs me. I live near a traditional pebble beach of an old seaside town and I love just strolling along the promenade taking photos. I also have an abundance of countryside nearby that I love to explore. I am blessed to live in an area of modest beauty.

6) Tell us about a project you’re working on.

I have an ongoing project photographing local churches and castles as we have a lot in this area. I am amazed at how they still stand, some from pre-1100 A.D. I think of all the people that have touched or carved the walls. The victories and losses in battle. The turning points in history, I just wander around them in amazement. If those walls could talk…

7) Who are your favorite photographers, instant or otherwise?

Having no formal photographic training, I have little knowledge of the masters of photography, however, I find myself thoroughly inspired by the instant work on Flickr and the Impossible galleries. Mentioning them all would be a long, long list! So a few to check out, undoubtedly be inspired by and wowed by are The Gentleman Amateur, Toby Hancock, Sarah Kirkham, Juli Werner, Kim Oberski, Toby Marsh…I really could go on, through one medium there is a world of majestic interpretation. There is such a supportive, enthusiastic and talented community to be found here.

8) If you could take a photo of anyone or anything what would it be?

Okay, at the risk of sounding cheesy…my wife. When I say this I mean having her at ease with herself in front of the camera to let me capture her unrelenting allure as I see it, every single day regardless of Make up/No make up, Happy/Sad, Dressed up/Dressed down. Not the snatched shots I have at the moment. The shot I chose here is one of only a couple I have of her posed.

About Benjamin

I am 28 years old and live with my lovely wife on the south coast of England. We are expecting our first child. I am a nurse working in a local hospital.

To see more of Ben’s work, please visit his Flickr photostream. You can also follow him on Twitter at @bozowizard.

No. 541

8 Exposures...with Troy Bradford

Patrick Tobin, | 1465 days ago

Welcome back to 8 Exposures, our instant film Q&A series. This week, we’re happy to bring you Texas photog Troy Bradford

1) What kind of Polaroid camera(s) do you use?

I have three working SX-70s, one 250 pack film camera, one modified 250 pack film camera with a Rodenstock 127mm lens added, one 100 pack film camera, two Spectra cameras, one 600 One Step Closeup and a 104 pack film camera converted to a pinhole camera.

2) Why do you like instant photography?

As most people will say, I like the fact that you get to hold the image immediately. In addition to that, I also like the fact that you get to watch the image come to life. The thrill of this process takes me back to my days in high school when I had my own darkroom and was able to watch film images develop before my eyes in the chemical bath. So that takes care of touch and sight, but I also like the smell of the peel-apart films. It is not like the smell is a pleasant one, it is just the fact that you can relate this smell to a developing picture…Now if you separate out just Impossible film and ask the same question, I would say that holding an Impossible image is like instantly holding a small piece of artwork.

3) What is your earliest memory of instant film?

Growing up in the 70s, I remember getting packs of instant film on Christmas morning. We would take pictures of everything and everyone. Not the most creative way to go thru a pack of Polaroid, but it was always fun! I still have many family memories that were captured on some form of Polaroid film.

4) What’s your favorite Impossible film type?

Like many, I have more than one favorite. I seem to be more consistent with PX 100, but more of my favorite images seem to come from PX 70 and PX 680.

5) What are your favorite subjects to photograph?

By far my favorite thing is people. And even more specific than that is family. I have had to branch out because my family has got to a point where they dread it when I pull a camera out. That drove me to find another avenue. I started taking a camera with me on all of my business trips. If at all possible, I would try to schedule in an hour or an afternoon/morning to go find something to photograph. I still prefer having people in the picture, however that is not always possible, depending on where you are photographing. My favorite style of photography on travel is Street Photography. Originally, this grew out of using a Leica M8 camera, but now I use my SX-70 camera just as much. My approach has mostly been trying for individual portraits. This allows me to stop someone with the intention of having a conversation and getting a portrait of them. Works most of the time, but you have to be ready to take a “no” with a little grace. Hard for me to understand, but I have had to realize that not everyone likes having their picture taken by a stranger.

6) Tell us about a project you’re working on.

My “project” has always been my blog. I have four blogs that all started because of a style of photography that I became interested in. My latest, that started in January of this year, is solely dedicated to instant photos. It has become the blog that I spend most of my time keeping current. I try and link all of the sites that I find interesting and relevant to the style of photography on the particular blog on each of the sites. Ultimately my blogs were created and I maintain them for my family, but I would be lying if I didn’t admit that it sure is rewarding when others visit and comment.

7) Who are your favorite photographers, instant or otherwise?

Most of the instant photographers that are my favorite have become so by following them via Twitter and watching their film libraries grow on their blog or on Flickr. I would say that I spend a whole lot more time viewing and getting motivation from their photos than I ever have a “famous” photographer. To name any one particular photographer from the Twitter world would do all of the others a disservice (and potentially even make them unfollow me :) ). However, as far as famous or published photographers go, I have been inspired by the likes of Magnum Photographers Elliott Erwitt and Bruce Gilden or established photographers like Helen Levitt, John Cohen and David Lykes Keenan (an Austin photographer). I couldn’t let this opportunity pass without also mentioning Tyler Tyndell as the creative genius behind a lot of what I do with instant photography. If it wasn’t for his creativity spilling over, then I would still be stuck only taking “clinically correct” images with a digital camera. I really owe it to him for re-introducing me to instant photography.

8) If you could take a photo of anyone or anything what would it be?

Without a doubt, the photo would be a portrait of Ed Dobson. He is a former pastor from Grand Rapids, MI who was diagnosed over 10 years ago with ALS (Lou Gehrig’s Disease). His face speaks volumes! He is a constant inspiration to me through his videos “Ed’s Story”.

About Troy

I live in Greenville, Texas and work as a Project Engineer at an aerospace company.

To see more of Troy’s work, please visit his blog and Flickr photostream. You can also follow Troy on Twitter at @troybradford

No. 535

8 Exposures...with Fernanda Montoro

Patrick Tobin, | 1472 days ago

Welcome back to 8 Exposures, kiddies. This week, our instant film Q&A series focuses on Fernanda Montoro

1) What kind of Polaroid camera(s) do you use?

The camera I love and use the most is the Polaroid SX-70. That’s the dream camera for me, the camera that has become the extension of my eyes. I often use a Polaroid 600 SE and Polaroid Spectra too. My little Polaroid camera collection also includes an SLR 680, a Mio, a couple of Miniportraits. And, of course, many SX-70s! I like to have them handy and to play with them from time to time, depending on the mood.

2) Why do you like instant photography?

I like absolutely everything about it!: Being able to watch the past become picture, in front of my eyes. Those whirring mechanical sounds that instant cameras make. Its distinctive painterly qualities, texture, saturation, ‘imperfections’. I even enjoy the limitation of having a limited number of shots! (Makes me respect the medium, compose more carefully, try my best in every frame). Also, thanks to instant photography I started to look at photography in a more serious way.

3) What is your earliest memory of instant film?

Unfortunately, my earliest memory is not from that long ago. There weren’t instant cameras around me when I grew up. I wish I had childhood memories framed in Polaroid! My earliest recollection of instant film is seeing a photo on Flickr that enchanted me. Later I learned that it had been taken with an SX-70 camera and Time Zero film. That photo started it all for me.

4) What’s your favorite Impossible film type?

It’s so hard to pick a favorite! I have fallen in love with every Impossible film type that I have tried! I like to experiment, so trying and learning to use each batch of IP film has been a very rewarding experience. There is something unique about every single one of them. The ones I am using more at the moment are PX 70 Color Shade for color and PZ 600 Silver Shade for B&W. But, again, there is something to love in every pack.

5) What are your favorite subjects to photograph?

Everything! As Henri Cartier-Bresson once famously said: “In photography, the smallest thing can be a great subject. The little human detail can become a leitmotif.” I can’t agree more!

6) Tell us about a project you’re working on.

I’m now working on Lovearoid, an exhibition we are having with Agustin Ferrando, my life and creative partner, at Art Büro from next month. The exhibit will be based on our ongoing collaborations and it will include both instant photography and video. We will be showing existing pieces, and creating new ones for the exhibit. I’m really excited about it, the process is proving to be very interesting.

7) Who are your favorite photographers, instant or otherwise?

Andrei Tarkovsky, Paolo Roversi, Guy Bourdin, Wolfgang Tillman, Robert Frank, Osamu Yokonami, Diane Arbus, Walker Evans, Rinko Kawauchi, Man Ray, Cindy Sherman, Paolo Roversi, Cartier-Bresson, William Eggleston, Heinrich Kühn, Patti Smith, to name a few. And of course, I am a huge fan of my instant photographer friends, many of whom I met online, and who inspire me on a daily basis. I wouldn’t like to forget anyone, they know who they are. We have built an amazing community around our passion.

8) If you could take a photo of anyone or anything what would it be?

I would love to get inside a Hayao Miyazaki animated film and take a photo of anything or anyone there. Capturing Totoro on IP film would be fantastic!:)

About Fernanda

I am a photographer, currently living and working between Montevideo and London. People say I talk fast and smile a lot.

To see more of Fernanda’s photography, visit her Facebook page. You can also follow her on Twitter at @fermontoro

No. 531

8 Exposures...with Thomas Böttcher

Patrick Tobin, | 1475 days ago

Welcome back to 8 Exposures, our instant film Q&A series. This week, we bring you German wonder Thomas Böttcher

1) What kind of Polaroid camera(s) do you use?

I have got three SX-70s (all without autofocus), a Spectra, several 600 cameras, two Landcameras: 320 and 330, and one 4×5 Polaback for my Sinar F 2. My favorite camera however is my SX-70 because it allows more room for creative work. I especially appreciate the aspect of the selective focus and the vintage charm of these cameras.

2) Why do you like instant photography?

Most people like instant photography because each photo is unique and can be looked at in a relatively short time. These are certainly also important aspects of instant photography for me, but I value even more the unique charm of the instant photography. It lives partly through its technical deficiency, its not being one hundred per cent perfect. A lot of photos today are defined exclusively through their technical perfection, so that the message of a picture often recedes into the background. In my opinion, the importance of megapixels and speed are often overestimated today. I personally don’t want to submit to either the stress of the latest technical progress or speed.

3) What is your earliest memory of instant film?

This is difficult to say because it dates back quite some years. I bought my first 600, and to be quite frank I was a bit disappointed because I could not vary the range of focus. You press the release, hear the buzzing of the camera and the photo is delivered. I inquired about the different types the Polaroid company produced and discovered that the SX-70 is just the right thing for me – I love it.

4) What’s your favorite Impossible film type?

PX 70 12/11 batch & PX 70 Cool and PX 100.

5) What are your favorite subjects to photograph?

I’d rather not commit myself to any special subject. It always depends on what I feel like doing or how I personally feel.
Since 2011, I’ve very much been interested in taking photos of people. This is not an easy subject because portrait photography is very popular. Nowadays it is more important for a lot of photographers to show people the way they might look rather than to show them the way they really are. I want to show people without using Photoshop, a studio, extensive flash equipment or a team of makeup artists – simply genuine and natural!

6) Tell us about a project you’re working on.

At first I want to continue taking portraits. Besides this I have three other subjects in mind. Among others I’d like to go on with the series of the diver. The other two subjects are still at a very early stage so that I’d rather not talk about them yet. I still need some more time.

7) Who are your favorite photographers, instant or otherwise?

Because of my love for the dark room and monochrome photography there is a very special name for me: Jeanloup Sieff.

8) If you could take a photo of anyone or anything what would it be?

I’d love to take the portrait of a famous person and try to show this person as natural as possible, not the typical, artificial high-gloss photos we see in the magazines every day. Some months ago I wrote to the management of the German actor Mario Adorf to take some pictures of him but I didn’t get an answer!

To see more of Thomas’ work, please visit his Flickr photostream.

No. 526

8 Exposures...with Ian Fleming

Patrick Tobin, | 1479 days ago

Hello friends! Welcome back to 8 Exposures, our instant film Q&A series. This entry turns the spotlight on our friend from across the pond, Ian Fleming

1) What kind of Polaroid camera(s) do you use?

I have rather too many. The SX-70 is my favourite. I have a SX-70 Sonar, a 645 CL and a Polaroid 1000 ‘red button’. For pack film, I have a lovely 180, a Big Swinger, a Square Shooter (which I have 3 packs of Viva for), plus my Big Shot, an underestimated camera.

2) Why do you like instant photography?

The instant gratification. I think Dr Land knew this; it’s highly addictive, having a real picture that has an ‘artistic’ feel to it. Oh, and it’s great fun.

3) What is your earliest memory of instant film?

We used Polaroids all the time in the Film and TV business for ID, Pack Shots, reference shots, etc. But I always found all the film and camera types very confusing; I’m not sure it helped Polaroid in the long term.

4) What’s your favorite Impossible film type?

Well, I have shot a ton of PX 680 First Flush in my SX-70 and got great results, but now it has to be PX 70 COOL, closely followed by PX 70 Nigo edition. For B&W I love PX 600 Black Frame, I bought a load of the Poor Pod film from last year; it’s a really easy film to use.

5) What are your favorite subjects to photograph?

Now this is difficult, but I think places, buildings, landscapes, I’m not that confident at portraiture.

6) Tell us about a project you’re working on.

Well, I spend most of my lunchtimes walking round Bristol Old Docks and Harbourside. I have loads of B&W film shots and loads of Instant shots, I’ve been asked to exhibit, but that’s something I need help with.

7) Who are your favorite photographers, instant or otherwise?

Henri Cartier-Bresson, Cecil Beaton and Ansel Adams.

8) If you could take a photo of anyone or anything what would it be?

I would love to spend a day in BBC Television Centre in London, and photograph the building and the people before the BBC leaves it.

About Ian

I live in Bath in the UK. I have a lovely wife who fortunately puts up with my ‘instant obsession’ and is a great photographer herself. I have been doing technical support in the radio and tv business for some 30 years, I spend all my work day with digital, so love analogue at home. My wife and I both love art and photography

No. 523

8 Exposures...with Sol Allen

Patrick Tobin, | 1482 days ago

Welcome back to 8 Exposures, our instant film Q&A series. This week, we are happy to present to you our good friend, Arizona wonder Sol Allen

1) What kind of Polaroid camera(s) do you use?

Although it seems like a good amount of my cameras are in an inoperable state, I tend to lean on my Polaroid SX-70 that I got refurbished from Unsaleable (Impossible’s predecessor), Hasseblad 503cw, Polaroid 450, Polaroid Spectra Pro and an Agfa Viking. I’ll usually throw one or two other ancient cameras in the bag, depending on what the shoot/trip is.

2) Why do you like instant photography?

Primarily, because of the unexpectedness of the film, especially if it’s expired. Every type of film has a learning curve and that’s fascinating to me. It’s wonderful to want, or to be told by a client, to achieve a certain look and to know what combination of camera and film will be able to create it. Also, I’m probably impatient.

3) What is your earliest memory of instant film?

The Polaroid ultrasound above. Just kidding. I grew up as an army brat, moving around quite a bit. When I was in kindergarten, my mom would take lots of Polaroids of me and my friends and I started keeping a photo book. I feel that she was creating an importance of documenting a place, time and the people who are around. I’d also take the camera whenever I could and walk around the house and yard to take pictures of the cats (which, I’m thankful I still have).

4) What’s your favorite Impossible film type?

So far, it has got to be PZ 680. The colors are so soft and it even makes the desert look somewhat temperate. I haven’t felt an attraction to a film like I do the PZ 680 since cross-processed Agfa Portrait 160.

5) What are your favorite subjects to photograph?

In the last couple of years, I have only been interested in documenting landscape. I started a personal project back in ’06 of documenting Arizona mining towns and reservation villages and I only have two areas left. I still love taking portraits, but, I don’t feel the urge to do so. Not like the urge I have to get in my car and go exploring in especially rural areas.

6) Tell us about a project you’re working on.

Like I mentioned above, my Arizona project. I plan on moving soon and am trying to pick a new state that will keep me busy for a few years. The west intrigues me and I plan on staying on this side of the United States for a while. Other than that, I have been working on ways to mix my painting and drawing with my photography.

7) Who are your favorite photographers, instant or otherwise?

My all time favorite photographer is W. Eugene Smith. Old jazz and soul LP covers are always my inspiration for my concert and musician photography. There are countless photographers on Flickr that are incredible and I feel so fortunate for the platform. A few favorites I can think of off the top of my head are Peter Schön (S_Peter), Reuben Wu, Jan Scholz (micmojo), Shannon Richardson (e l e c t r o l i t e), Rom (llemor) and Vladimir Longauer ([vla:d]). There are many others, and I wish I had the kind of memory to mention them all. I’m constantly grateful for all the support I have received throughout the years from the incredibly kind and talented folk I’ve met on Flickr.

8) If you could take an photo of anyone or anything what would it be?

I like to think of bands that I would love to tour with if I got the chance. The Roots were definitely at the top of my hip hop list and I thank the stars everyday to have gotten that chance and to continue to work with them. I’d have to say that it would be incredible to tour with Radiohead and also, Björk. Also, Fela Kuti’s sons, Femi and Seun and their incredible bands. Otherwise, to go back to the landscape, I just wish I had the means to travel more. Everywhere.

About Sol

Photographer, music lover & a dog’s best friend

To see more of Sol’s work, please visit her Flickr photostream and her Etsy shop. You can also follow her on Twitter at @solexposure.

No. 520

8 Exposures...with Penny Felts

Patrick Tobin, | 1486 days ago

Photo by Zia Khan

Hello instanteers, and welcome back to 8 Exposures, our instant film Q&A series. This week, we’re happy to bring you Penny Felts, who has produced a series of diptychs, with each representing a different decade of the 20th century…

1) What kind of Polaroid camera(s) do you use?

Most of the time I use SX-70s, an SLR 680, Land Camera 180 and a Holga with a Polaroid back. I also have a 600SE, Reporter, Polaroid Pinhole 80, Polaroid Pathfinder 110A and a Polaroid Big Shot that I use occasionally.

2) Why do you like instant photography?

What can I say, I love instant gratification with blur, softness, magic, and without pixels. It’s pure happiness.

3) What is your earliest memory of instant film?

When I was a kid, my parents bought one of the cheap plastic 600 model cameras, I’m not sure which one, but I remember the first time that I held a polaroid in my hand and watched it develop. I was hooked right then and there.

4) What’s your favorite Impossible film type?

Right now it is definitely the newest PX 70. I absolutely love the colors. It’s so versatile under different conditions. You can make them really bright, or soft and warm.

5) What are your favorite subjects to photograph?

I’m a corny photographer at heart. It’s not particularly a subject, it’s more of a daydream or a story that I’m going for. The model in these photos calls me a ‘concept photographer’.

6) Tell us about a project you’re working on.

Well, I just finished a project which you see here, where I collaborated with one model (Elle Long), to go through 8 decades of fashion and cameras.

I’m also starting a small personal project of portraits and stories of people who are 70+. The idea began when my son mentioned to me how much he enjoyed when my father tells him little stories of his life as a boy. I will be shooting the portraits on the new Impossible COOL films.

7) Who are your favorite photographers, instant or otherwise?

Of course there are far too many to list, but here are just a few: Famous ones that come to mind are Lillian Bassman, Edward Steichen, Clarence Sinclair Bull, Richard Avedon and Margaret Bourke White.

Other photographers who I look forward to seeing images from on a daily basis are: Philippe Bourgoin, Ludwig West, ‘The Gentleman Amateur’, Akshay Bhoan, ‘milkysoldier’, ‘carmendevos’ and ‘Bastiank80’ from Flickr. There are many, many more, but the last photographer whom I’ll list here is of course the most personally important to me, Zia, who mentors and inspires me everyday. I fell in love with his photography before I met him, and then I fell in love with him.

8) If you could take a photo of anyone or anything what would it be?

My mom in the 1950s.

About Penny

I am currently living in Nashville, working in the medical field so that I can make enough money to pay for my film addiction.

You can follow Penny on Twitter at @pennyfeltsnanni

No. 517

8 Exposures...with Balthazar Simões.

Patrick Tobin, | 1489 days ago

Greetings from 8 Exposures Land! It’s good to see you again! This week in our instant film Q&A series, we spoke with Balthazar Simões

1) What kind of Polaroid camera(s) do you use?

My favorite Polaroid cameras are my SX-70 (of course) and a Polaroid 350. I have a Spectra, too and a Polaroid Studio Express 484 that has 4 lenses and is quite fun.

2) Why do you like instant photography?

Because it’s an experience of true magic. Because it’s an instant tangible artifact. Because each image is one-of-a-kind and can’t be reproduced.

3) What is your earliest memory of instant film?

My Grandpa was always the one with the cameras when I was growing up. I can still remember the feeling of watching a polaroid develop when we went to visit my grandparents for Christmas. Most things become less magical as we grow older, but it persists with my experience of instant film. My Grandpa passed away two summers ago and I was recently given all of his cameras. Sadly, he no longer had his Polaroid cameras, but he had quite a few film cameras that I now cherish. One of the cameras still had some film in it, and I just had it developed last week. All the photos were of this vase of tulips. I eventually was able to figure out that they were taken on their last wedding anniversary before he died. At that point he could hardly see and it’s precious to me that those were probably the last photos he ever took.

4) What’s your favorite Impossible film type?

I’ve adored a few batches of PX 680 (in particular the beta test batch and the batch that had a stripe defect). The PX 70 Color Shade has been very good to me. I have some PX 70 Color Shade Cool on the way (at last!) and I can’t wait to try it out. I’ve taken many shots with various types of the Silver Shade films that I love, but my true love is color.

5) What are your favorite subjects to photograph?

People. I’m so curious about people. I also get obsessed with certain colors and tones and patterns.

6) Tell us about a project you’re working on.

My biggest ongoing project is my letter and Polaroid project. The letter is my favorite writing medium, and a few years ago I decided to let anyone request a letter from me. A little while after I began writing letters, Zora Strangefields (one of the lovely ladies behind Tickl Magazine) requested one and I included a Polaroid with her letter. After that, I thought that I should be sending Polaroids with all the letters. What I like about both the letter and the Polaroid is that they are each unique and can’t be reproduced. At this point I’ve sent out almost 500 to people all over the world. I choose each Polaroid carefully for the person I’m writing to, and it gets connected to the context of the letter. I scan each letter and Polaroid before I mail them out. This year I plan to put together a book of a small selection of them.

7) Who are your favorite photographers, instant or otherwise?

Picking favorites is so hard for me. I’ll give it a shot: Henri Cartier-Bresson, Jan Saudek, Nan Goldin, Robert Mapplethorpe, Guy Bourdin, Traci Lynn Matlock, Barbara Nitke, Helmut Newton, Sophie Calle (she’s obviously much more than a photographer). There are so many I’ve left out.

8) If you could take a photo of anyone or anything what would it be?

Old fishermen in Portugal. And Sophie Calle. She’s my hero.

About Balthazar

I’m from a small seaside town in Portugal. I live curiously.

Thanks to Balthazar for taking part in 8 Exposures. You can follow him on Twitter at @callmebalthazar.

No. 513

8 Exposures...with Steve Maniscalco

Patrick Tobin, | 1493 days ago

Greetings, instanteers! Welcome back to 8 Exposures, our instant film Q&A series. This week, we bring you Arizona’s own Steve Maniscalco

1) What kind of Polaroid camera(s) do you use?

I won’t try to get an accurate count…something like 4 SX-70 Alphas, 2 autofocus Model 2 cameras, and 2 SLR 680s. Two of my SX-70 alphas have been converted to shoot 600 film by modifying the auto exposure circuitry. I have several Spectra cameras, including a Macro 5 SLR. Also, 2 Land 250s, a 195, a 180 and a 430. Oh, and a pack film back for a home-made pinhole camera.

2) Why do you like instant photography?

I tell people I haven’t got enough patience to wait for digital, and immediacy is certainly part of the equation. I love being able to share the results right away. I often take multiple shots so I can give away one. Putting a physical picture in a child’s hands and watching the reaction is priceless.

Instant photography feels very honest to me. When the picture is taken, you’re done. You can scan it and alter it if you like. You can share the altered version on line or in print…but somewhere, hidden in your attic perhaps, is the true image. That image is cropped the way you shot it, exposed the way you chose and is the product of your decisions at the instant of exposure.

3) What is your earliest memory of instant film?

My father owned a Land 100 camera. He used the rangefinder as an opportunity for a math lesson.

4) What’s your favorite Impossible Project film type?

The newest PX-70 is incredible. From where I am, only an improved opacity layer is between it and perfect.

5) What are your favorite subjects to photograph?

For the most part, I’m an opportunistic shooter. I keep cameras available and I keep my eyes open. If I’m camping, you’ll see landscapes. As I travel, you’ll see small town Arizona. When I have dedicated photography time on my hands, you’ll likely see urban bits and pieces. Rarely, I’ll work up the nerve to shoot people.

6) Tell us about a project you’re working on.

I’ve been going through my instant shots and I think it’s time I make prints of many of them. Enough prints, perhaps, for a show. The challenge being, of course, to find some place to hang it. If I do find that place, I plan on hanging the original instant right next to the print, keeping me honest.

7) Who are your favorite photographers, instant or otherwise?

Landscapes were my first love, so I can’t go without mentioning Ansel Adams. I would also count Gustave Baumann, a woodcut printer, as a major influence, perhaps more even than St. Ansel. I love Paul Strand and Alfred Stieglitz and find their work amazing. Honestly though, I spend less time looking at work by “famous dead people” and far more time with the great stuff being done right now by people I “know” online. I’m confident that some of those folks will be the new “famous dead people” in a couple of generations.

8) If you could take a photo of anyone or anything what would it be?

I’m completely enamored with an Australian singer named Sia. I’d like to follow her around for a week or so with a Pentax 6×7 and hope to capture some of the personality that comes out in her performances.

To see more of Steve’s photography, visit his Flickr photostream. You can also follow him on Twitter at @SteveMPhotog.

No. 510

8 Exposures...with Micaela Go

Patrick Tobin, | 1496 days ago

Welcome back to 8 Exposures, friends. This week in our popular instant film Q&A series, we’re happy to bring you California photographer Micaela Go

1) What kind of Polaroid camera(s) do you use?

Recently, I’ve been using an SLR 680 I’ve borrowed from a friend (I’ve gone through 3 already), but I also use my SX-70, ProPack and have picked up a Minolta Instant Pro and hope to use it more often.

2) Why do you like instant photography?

Right before all those little compact digital cameras became so ubiquitous, I picked up my first SLR 680. I loved it because it was instant – I could take a photo and have something tangible in my hands within seconds, then see the actual image within minutes. Now, Impossible Project film adds so many more qualities to instant photography that I love. I’m drawn to the unpredictability of the film, and every image is unique. The novelty of having this one image and it being the only one of its kind is remarkable. There’s also the aspect of how ephemeral the images are; watching each exposure develop and seeing how it continues to change after days, weeks, and months is something I find rather exciting.

3) What is your earliest memory of instant film?

I was probably around 12 years old when I found my dad’s old One Step (with film in it!) and I took it with me everywhere. I took pictures of my friends and family mostly (not much has changed since then).

4) What’s your favorite Impossible film type?

I’m very fickle, so right now I’m all about the PX 680 Color Shade and I love the contrast of the PX 680 Gold Edition. I think my best shots are on PX 600 Silver Shade though, haha.

5) What are your favorite subjects to photograph?

Definitely people. I can’t stop doing portraits. As a wedding photographer, I love to get authentic, natural portraits, which is something I do whenever I photograph people in general.

6) Tell us about a project you’re working on.

I’ve been wanting to go on more road trips in the coming months, so hopefully I can start a project involving that somehow.

7) Who are your favorite photographers, instant or otherwise?

Richard Avedon is a huge influence for me. Steven Meisel, Mary Ellen Mark, Diane Arbus. Annie Leibovitz – especially her group portraits, which I find mesmerizing.

8) If you could take a photo of anyone or anything what would it be?

Willie Nelson. Maybe Beyoncé, but only if she’s not all done up.

About Micaela

I’m from the San Francisco Bay Area, specifically San Jose, California. I’m a freelance photographer – mainly weddings (which I love) – and I also work at Stanford University (I work in a department that does digital archiving of really old books and other cool stuff).

To see more of Micaela’s work, visit www.faustphotographics.com/. You can also follow her on Twitter at @micaela_

No. 506

8 Exposures...with Joep Gottemaker

Patrick Tobin, | 1500 days ago

Hello, Impossible friends, and welcome back to 8 Exposures, our popular instant film Q&A series. This week, we are happy to present you with a special 8 Exposures featuring one of our biggest fans and greatest friends, Joep Gottemaker

1) What kind of Polaroid camera(s) do you use?

I mainly use my SX-70 original from 1972. I also own packfilm cameras, a Spectra and SLR 680 camera. I use the Spectra 1200 (with LCD screen) a lot too. The SX-70 goes everywhere with me. If it’s to Paris or just a dog walk, the SX-70 is in my pocket.

2) Why do you like instant photography?

I think the main reason is the fact that every Impossible is one of a kind. There is just that special quality to the pictures that no other medium has. Not 35mm or digital, the pictures just have that “magical” color.

And the fact that the pictures are instantly pushed in your hands. The sound of the motor, the picture coming out and the development. The thing with Impossible film is that you can’t predict what the picture will turn out like. With old fashioned Polaroid film, you could see the the picture develop before your eyes.
That’s so special about the Impossible films: you put them in your pocket, wait ten minutes (for color) and than there is the exitement if your picture turned out right.

I just love to go shooting in nature, because there is so much too see. I look through my eyes, and see what could fit for the image area of the SX-70 or Spectra. The trees, lakes and flowers, they are just very special to me. I usually also take my tripod to the fields, to take pictures of us all together as a family, which I love to photograph.

Impossible pictures are Impossible to recreate again, so that’s why I’m shooting them. To have my life documented on Impossible pictures for later.

3) What is your earliest memory of instant film?

Well, that was back in 2006 when I bought my very first Polaroid 600 box type camera in a thriftshop for 2 euro. I asked my dad, how does this work? He didn’t know, so we went to the local photoshop and bought some original Polaroid 600 film. I was hooked when I took my first shot. There was just something special about those pictures.

I stopped shooting back in 2008 when Polaroid decided to discontinue all instant films.
I sold all my Polaroid cameras, and stopped shooting all together. 2 years later, I discovered the SX-70. I found the camera amazingly beautiful, so I bought one. I was obsessed! I bought all the 600 film that was left, and shot beautiful pictures.

My mother and father didn’t own a Polaroid camera back in those days.

4) What’s your favorite Impossible film type?

The PX 680 COOL film for sure! The image quality is outstanding, the image itself is very stable and has very quick development. My second favorite is the PZ 680 COOL film. It is basically the same as PX 680 COOL, but only wider.

I’m a color freak, so I don’t shoot B&W Impossible film at all. The colors of Impossible films go to a much higher level than Polaroid ever did. Even when you shoot PX 680 COOL in rainy weather, the colors will turn out amazing.

5) What are your favorite subjects to photograph?

Well, that’s a very easy question. When I get out of school or work, I step on my bike and go in the wild nature. I photograph what I see that needs to be photographed.
I also love to photograph beautiful women, but I’m a bit shy, so you don’t see a lot of portraits of them.

Beautiful buildings are also a favorite thing for me to shoot: old houses or old cities are amazing to photograph.

6) Tell us about a project you’re working on.

I am going to work on a project: a tour around my country this summer vacation is in the planning. I’d love to shoot a model sometime with a vintage dress, ’60s hair and make up, that’s amazing!

7) Who are your favorite photographers, instant or otherwise?

I only know Flickr photographers, and there are some amazing ones around there! I really like the The Gentleman Amateur, abdukted1456, ten minutes, anniebee, Bradley Laurent and keep counting.

8) If you could take a photo of anyone or anything what would it be?

I would love to photograph the nature and culture of other countries over the world, and take pictures of the architecture of the buildings. And beautiful people of course.

About Joep

Hi, I am Joep Gottemaker and i’m 18 years old. I live in the Netherlands.

Taking Polaroid/Impossible pictures means the world to me. I can’t picture my world without it.

To see more of Joep’s photography, please visit his Flickr photo stream

No. 495

8 Exposures...with Kat White

Patrick Tobin, | 1507 days ago

G’day from Impossible, and welcome back to 8 Exposures! This week, we’re happy to bring you one of our favorite Aussies, graphic designer/photographer Kat White

1) What kind of Polaroid camera(s) do you use?

My favourite two cameras are my Automatic 180 and my SX-70 Original.

2) Why do you like instant photography?

The characteristics of expired film, and the fact that it’s permanent and tangible.

I love seeing the reaction of passersby, in awe of a seemingly old camera still getting used. And even better when someone stops you to tell you they had a camera just like it!

I also love how passionate the instant/polaroid community is. About the cameras, the film, and always willing to share and collaborate their tips.

3) What is your earliest memory of instant film?

Receiving a Polaroid iZone camera as a gift, then a One600, and it just grew from there.

4) What’s your favorite Impossible film type?

My favorites are PX 70 and PX 100. I never had the pleasure of experiencing Polaroid black and white film, so the PX 100 is a rare treat!

5) What are your favorite subjects to photograph?

Nature, landscapes, architecture and geometry. Whether it’s close-ups or just taking in the entire surroundings, I love everything that nature has to offer. I also find myself drawn to angles and lines. Architecture definitely gives me plenty of inspiration too.

6) Tell us about a project you’re working on.

I tend to find myself drawn to nature, but have a strong connection with design and typography. For years I’ve been planning on creating a series around the alphabet.

7) Who are your favorite photographers, instant or otherwise?

Dan Ryan, The Gentleman Amateur, the lovely Emilie Lefellic, His & Hers, fellow Australians Amanda Mason and Dan Klaas, and too many more to mention.

8) If you could take a photo of anyone or anything what would it be?

A local polaroider in every city I visit. So far I’ve met Emilie in Paris, Keico in Yokohama, Teresa in Auckland, not to mention all the peeps in Melbourne!

Thanks to Kat for taking part in 8 Exposures! To see more of her photography, please visit her Flickr photostream.
To purchase her book on Blurb, click HERE

Kat also has an iPhone App featuring her instant photography, which can be found HERE

Follow her on Twitter at @katwhite_

No. 492

8 Exposures...with Kim Oberski

Patrick Tobin, | 1510 days ago

Greetings, instamaniacs. Welcome back to 8 Exposures, our instant film Q&A series. This entry brings you Michigan photographer and good Impossible friend Kim Oberski

1) What kind of Polaroid camera(s) do you use?

I primarily use a Polaroid SX-70 original but have recently added a modified Polaroid 110a with integral and pack film backs. Also on the camera shelf: Mamiya RB67 with integral film back, Polaroid rainbow onestep (which was my Grandmother’s), Polaroid 210 (what my mom used 40-some years ago), a Spectra, and a variety of Polaroid 600s.

2) Why do you like instant photography?

I love how instant film has taught me to let go of trying to make an image “perfect.” Sure a divot shows up, one of the chemical pods streaks, or the image is slightly out of focus; it doesn’t matter because those can be the very imperfections which make the image perfect.

3) What is your earliest memory of instant film?

I don’t have an exact memory of when I first remember instant film, it seems instant film/cameras have always been around me somehow. Growing up, every time I looked in the coat closet, I remember seeing the case for a Polaroid 210 Land Camera sitting on the shelf. I remember looking at it, yet unfazed because it was always there. Looking through old photos always contained images taken on instant film. It wasn’t until 2009 when I bought a Polaroid One Step that I really took notice of instant photography. This past year, my mom passed down to me my grandmother’s Polaroid Rainbow OneStep and her Polaroid 210 Land Camera.

4) What’s your favorite Impossible film type?

This question is like asking a parent who their favorite child is. Sitting at my computer thinking, I can see all my old images shot in various TIP films/batches and there’s something I love about each of the films. I have used almost every single film TIP produced except Fade to Black and the Spectra Softtone. PX 70 PUSH was wonderful for the soft romantic hues it produced when not warmed, PX 680 First Flush was my go-to for a long time because of the slight retro feel, the silver shades for their timeless feel, and now PX 70 for the true color it produces.

5) What are your favorite subjects to photograph?

My favorite subjects to shoot is anything which includes a person. A long time ago, I learned I am not a landscape photographer. For me, people add a certain element to a photograph, they become the anchor in my images. Before almost every photo I take, I ask “what story/message am I trying to capture?” If I can’t answer the question, I don’t take the photo. This doesn’t mean every photo has deep meaning, many times I simply want to have a snap shot of today and what is occurring around us.

This past Memorial Day weekend, we were at my parents’ house and there was a box filled with photos from when my great grandmother and grandparents where younger than I am now. I remember looking at the photos filled with people I love and feeling a connection to the image. My grandfather, who suffered from MS, was standing and swimming in lakes – something I was never able to actually see him do. Then I think about a Kickstarter project introduced to me a week or so ago about a grandson wanting to scan all of his grandfather’s old slides to make into a book, the images are phenomenal!!! This gentleman took photographs of beautiful scenery, yet almost all were anchored with a person in the frame. In my mind, images with people makes me wonder about who they are (if I don’t know them already), what is their life like, or what are they thinking.

6) Tell us about a project you’re working on.

My goal for this summer is to teach my girls the basics of photography, light, composition, and shutter speed. They each have their own Polaroid and film but tend to shoot a lot of objects laying around their bedrooms. You can only image what those images look like :). All the kids who come over to play are fascinated with my Polaroid and instant film so I would love for my kids to be able to document their summer vacation with friends on instant film. fingers crossed

A long term “project” I like to think I’m doing is capturing life. I’m always encouraged by photographers such as Vivian Maier, who didn’t use her camera to make money or try to win fame. She captured life around her because she could. My greatest hope would be that one day someone else will appreciate the snippets of my life as much as my family does.

7) Who are your favorite photographers, instant or otherwise?

I hate naming favorites because I’m drawn more to specific images before I even know who took the photo. BUT a few instant photographers I am almost always drawn to their images are Emilie Le Fellic, Brian Henry, and Ludwig West. All three have a distinctive style I can pick out without even knowing who took the photo.

Sally Mann is also a huge favorite. Her work with wet plate collodion and her family is unique and inspiring. A few years ago, I was at the NYC MOMA and saw Sally’s image of her daughter sitting in a chair. The image was simple yet captivating. I walked out of the museum forgetting the name of the photographer but the image burned in my mind. Later that year, a friend posted the same MOMA image as inspiration on her FB wall, I’ve never forgotten Sally Mann since. What I wouldn’t do to learn from her.

8) If you could take a photo of anyone or anything what would it be?

I think I would like to be able to take a photo of God in heaven, and still live to show everyone the photo.

About Kim

Currently, I’m taking a break from portrait photography work in Southeast Michigan to focus on keeping my flickr and blog filled with images of my own children.

To see more of Kim’s work, please visit her Flickr photostream. You can also follow her on Twitter at @kimunscripted

No. 486

8 Exposures...with Philippe Bourgoin

Patrick Tobin, | 1514 days ago

Portrait of Phillip, © Frenchcockpit 2011

Welcome back to 8 Exposures, our popular instant film Q&A series. This week, we bring you French photographer and author Philippe Bourgoin

1) What kind of Polaroid camera(s) do you use?

The Polaroid cameras I most use are the SX-70 and the 600 SE.

In my usual rig, I also always carry a Hasselblad 503cx with a Pola back. My second best camera is a Holga with a Pola back, for specific projects, or to bring along at polameets at our usual waterhole in Paris.

2) Why do you like instant photography?

As a portraitist and a photographer of female nudes, I work on a one to one relationship with the models (no assistant, no MUA). Intimacy is a given.

When the first couple of test shots eject and develop, the idea of the picture I want to make becomes flesh, it can be touched, it’s alive: instant photography is all about sharing.

Trust rises: a “not so good” picture can be thrown right out the window, and I obviously can’t pretend that it’s going to look good when it comes back from the lab (and after two hours of Photoshop)…Flaws show right up…No lies, no disguise, we take it from there.

As a portraitist, intant photography is taking risks: the models know my work, obviously only the good pictures that I show, and they come to get the best out of me, in a short couple of hours. The challenge is of course on both sides, and most girls are willing to give their best.

And…Oh no! Once I rented a chic hotel room with gorgeous Ohana. We got in the room and I suddenly realized I forgot the bulbs of the spotlights at home…Or I’m on a good streaming shoot with lovely Elsa and I go get some fresh packs of PX 100 in the next room just to realize they have been roasting in the sun for the past hour…Or your darling Polaroid 600SE slowly dies on you just when you were going to get your best shot of the day…Or…Or…And you simply just go to come up with some good shots anyway…

There’s nothing like this thrill.

3) What is your earliest memory of instant film?

This would go back to my early teens, in the sixties. An uncle of mine had a Land Camera and I can remember the sunny day he took pictures of my mother and I, by the beach. I could swear I remember the smell of the peel-apart film…On a later occasion, I vividly remember the sound of an SX-70 ejecting a picture that developed under my very eyes. The pure magic of this. The colors…In my youth, I didn’t have many reasons to rejoice, the world was grey as the buildings of Paris before André Malraux decided to clean them.

4) What’s your favorite Impossible film type?

After Polaroid stopped to produce films, there were quite a few months of despair…Then The Impossible Project came along, and I made it a rule to buy every single new film they released. I can say I have tried them all! My fondest memories would go to the PX 100 First Flush, because it was the first one, the first sign of the the rebirth of instant films. I remember the thrill of participating to the “Exploring PX Silver Shade” project on polanoid.net in 2010…

5) What are your favorite subjects to photograph?

Women, women, women.

6) Tell us about a project you’re working on.

Strangely enough, after years concentrating on light reflecting on soft female skin, I have a project in the making that is all about shadows…

7) Who are your favorite photographers, instant or otherwise?

After I checked my bookshelves, I would say Avedon, Mapplethorpe, Araki, Molinier, Berquet, Bourdin, Newton, Witkin, Penn…I’m not being very original here, I’m afraid. Moreover I must confess that in terms of influences, I’m so old school that I’d rather talk of Italian classical paintings or Greek statues…

8) If you could take a photo of anyone or anything what would it be?

I would say my wife, again and again as I did for the past twenty years.

About Philippe

Philippe was born in Paris, France, and went to New York University Film School. He directed a few short films and wrote a feature film. He was a record producer and music publisher in France and wrote a few hit songs. He has written a handful of short stories (published), with a book in the making. But basically, as a retired song writer, all he does now is shoot instant film.

No. 483

8 Exposures...with Kelly Knaga

Patrick Tobin, | 1517 days ago

Hello, friends, and welcome back to 8 Exposures, our popular instant film Q&A series. This week, we’re happy to bring you a Midwest girl, Kelly Knaga

1) What kind of Polaroid camera(s) do you use?

I’ve collected a number of cameras mostly through garage sales, Goodwill stores and eBay, but I tend to use the same 4 over and over: my SX-70, my refurbished 340 Land Camera, a Spectra I got from a retired cop and my very first 600 that my grandmother gave me one summer when I was about 10.

2) Why do you like instant photography?

I love the moment just before, the one where I hold my breath, waiting for the film to develop. I love the imperfections and inconsistencies of instant film, which seems relevant to the constant fluctuations and vulnerabilities that occur in life. Experimental films, expired films, a scratched camera lens or vintage, barely working, taped together cameras all invite moments of exploration of space, color, time or the material composition of the film itself.

3) What is your earliest memory of instant film?

Someone taking a picture of my grandfather holding me on his lap while he is sitting on his tractor. I still have the photo.

4) What’s your favorite Impossible film type?

I love experimenting with them all. I think my favorite right now are the Spectra Cool films. My sincerest thanks to Impossible for helping keep instant film alive.

5) What are your favorite subjects to photograph?

I have always been drawn to natural landscapes and the small, incredible, every day moments we often dismiss or take for granted.

6) Tell us about a project you’re working on.

I’m currently working on a long-term project about the Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore. I’m also documenting the urban farm I’m building with my friend. But my life-long goal is to hike and photograph all of the U.S. National Parks.

7) Who are your favorite photographers, instant or otherwise?

I tend to gravitate toward landscape photographers. But I also have a great interest in portrait and food photographers as well.

8) If you could take a photo of anyone or anything what would it be?

Iceland. Definitely Iceland. It just looks like a magical place, doesn’t it?

About Kelly

Kelly is a designer, teacher, farmer, photographer and is always up for a great adventure.

To see more of Kelly’s work, please visit her Flickr photostream. You can also follow her on Twitter at @amidwestgirl.

No. 473

8 Exposures...with Toby Hancock

Patrick Tobin, | 1524 days ago

Photo by Rommel Pecson

Hello, Impossibles! We’re back with another entry in our instant film Q&A series, 8 Exposures. This week, we are happy to bring you LA-based Brit wonder Toby Hancock

1. What kind of Polaroid camera(s) do you use?:

I built an extensive collection of Polaroid cameras in the 1990s, which was a time when they could be bought dirt cheap at flea markets and on eBay. So, I regularly use two somewhat beaten up SLR 680s and two or three SX-70 Sonars. I usually have at least two on hand loaded with different types of film. I have turned my 680s into Frankenroids by swapping the film doors for SX-70 ones, which has resulted in fewer divots (not that there’s anything wrong with divots!). Impossible Project’s Dr “Frankenroid” Love has a very informative blog post about this simple transformation HERE.

2. Why do you like instant photography?:

As many before me have said, it’s magic in the palm of your hand. It’s unpredictable and often creates unexpected, but beautiful results. Undoubtedly, the more you shoot, the more predictable it becomes, but there’s always the potential for one of those perfect mistakes to be lurking around the next corner.

3 simple rules to shoot Impossible film by:

1. Always expect the unexpected and embrace the fact that it might give you some of your best images
2. There’s no such thing as a wasted Polaroid
3. Never throw any photograph away
4. There’s probably a fourth rule, but I can’t think of it right now

3. What is your earliest memory of instant film?

Unlike many people, there wasn’t a Polaroid in my household while I was growing up, so I don’t have any of those cute or embarrassing stories to share with you.

My lawyer has advised me not to answer this question and to give you my second earliest memory, instead. The earliest one is boring and I don’t really remember it very well, except to say that it definitely didn’t involve a Straight Shooter, and activities that may or may not be illegal in some countries. In any case, all the photos were overexposed. Maybe overexposed is the wrong word to use here?

My second earliest memory was in the early 1980s at the beginning of my career in TV and film production, where Polaroid film was ubiquitous. It was an industrial tool used by casting directors, the wardrobe and art departments, script supervisors, cinematographers, etc., etc. It was a major part of any production. Of course, it was also used to take fun pictures of co-workers and everyone had a few Polaroids stuck on the office wall. I never dreamed it would ever be anything more than that to me.

But that all changed, when I met…

…to be continued in Question 7 (I love a good cliffhanger)

4. What’s your favorite Impossible film type?:

Some weeks ago, when I first started to procrastinate about answering these questions, I would’ve said PX 600 UV+. However, since then I’ve had the chance to use the newly released Cool films and my new favorite is PX 680 Cool, closely followed by the latest PX 100. As someone who’s been a “color guy” for decades, all the Impossible black and white films have been a revelation. In the end, I’ve had great success and enjoyment shooting all the different editions and flavors, so to try to pick a favorite is similar to asking a parent to pick their favorite child. My parents would have picked me!

5. What are your favorite subjects to photograph?:

I shoot many subjects. I’ve always loved night photography & landscapes, but I also like portraiture, aerial photography, abandoned places and things, food, nature. If I can point a camera at it, I’ll take a picture, provided the security guards don’t get to me first.

6. Tell us about a project you’re working on:

Nothing specific at the moment. One of these days I hope to publish a book or two of my hundreds of Time Zero manipulations and Impossible images. Unfortunately, scanning and curating them will probably take the rest of my life.

7. Who are your favorite photographers, instant or otherwise?:

Previously on 8 Exposures with Toby Hancock – But that all changed, when I met…

Michael Dare, who introduced me to the miracle of Polaroid Time Zero manipulation. Watching him do his brilliant work, completely changed my concept of instant photography… In an instant (pun intended), it went from a bit of fun and invaluable work tool to a pretty serious art form, although still fun.

Other instant photographers? Andy Warhol, David Hockney, Ansel Adams (instant and other), Helmut Newton (instant and other). And then there’s the incredible Flickr community – way too many people to mention, so I’ll offer up three guys and three girls. Ladies first, the outstanding Rhiannon Adam, the wonderful Jessica Reinhardt and the extraordinary Kim Oberski. And these dudes: The Gentleman Amateur, Brandon Long and Rommel Pecson, who captured my double chin so perfectly in the portrait that accompanies this piece. These six, along with dozens and dozens more favorites, are an inspiration to me everyday. It goes without saying that the folks at Impossible are an extremely talented group of shooters.

Non-instant photographers – Brassaï and his brilliant night and street photography, the amazing Sally Mann, the really rather good Man Ray, not bad for a girl Annie Leibovitz. And again, too many others to mention.

8. If you could take any photo of anyone or anything what would it be?:

I’m a big fan of clichéd, iconic, tourist attractions. I always hope to find a different angle or take on something that’s been photographed literally millions of times before. So, with that in mind, I’ll say the Taj Mahal. Honestly though, while that’s something I’d like to see in person, I’d be just as happy jumping in my car with a bag of cameras and driving out to the desert in search of an abandoned gas station or rundown small town.

About Toby

British-born Toby Hancock has been living in Los Angeles for over 30 years. He is a semi-retired veteran of the TV and Film business, but would consider coming out of retirement if Mr. Spielberg called. When he grows up he’d like to be a photographer.

You can follow Toby on Twitter at @tobysx70

No. 466

8 Exposures...with Justin Craigen

Patrick Tobin, | 1531 days ago

Hi there, Impossibles. Welcome back to 8 Exposures, our instant film Q&A series. This week, we’re happy to bring you one of the original members of the Save Polaroid movement, Justin Craigen

1) What kind of Polaroid camera(s) do you use?

SX-70 Alpha 1 Model 1, SX-70 Model 1 Sonar, Spectra, 450, and a pinhole camera with a packfilm back.

2) Why do you like instant photography?

It’s a variety of reasons. One that has been particularly important is the social aspect of the medium. Instant photos are, more than any other type, perfect for sharing with others. More importantly, getting involved with instant photography has brought me into contact with a large number of absolutely wonderful and inspiring people that otherwise, I would have likely never met. I’ve had the pleasure of meeting a handful of them in person, and so far all are as good, or better, in the flesh.

There’s also the element of unpredictability that comes with the medium. It forces the photographer into a zone where the varying degree of lack of control is embraced. And with Impossible’s in-house produced films, there has been a real effort required to get predictable results. It’s much less of a struggle now, but even so, I find that the emotional payoff of a successful image is significantly greater than with other types of film, or digital photography.

I also enjoy the manipulations that can be done—partly for aesthetics, and partly because once a manipulation is made, there’s no going back. The unique nature of each shot forces the manipulator to commit to the process in a way that digital manipulation is totally lacking. Go too far, and there’s no recovering the original shot. If you screw up, that’s it. It’s gone. And then the process of deciding if there’s still a valid image in the result begins.

3) What is your earliest memory of instant film?

In high school, a friend had a 600 camera and was taking some photos of classmates. Nice stuff, not just nudie stuff. Some of that too, though, which is a reputation that can be hard to get away from with the medium.

4) What’s your favorite Impossible film type?

Oh…god. One of the early test film batches that I was a test photographer for, I think it was Type 42. That was temperamental, but when it clicked, I still think it was the most lovely of the b&w films (even if it was, under some lighting, more sepia than true b&w).

Also Fade to Black, Artistic Time Zero, and the Chocolate and Sepia pack film. Technically, yes, Polaroid stuff, but Polaroid would never have done anything other than trash the materials without TIP. So, nuts to Polaroid, those (along with the Blue 100) are TIP film in my eyes.

Fade to Black and Type 42 then, are my favourite Impossible films. I hope that the factory crew can pull of a miracle and give us something comparable to FtB someday. I would rather have that than a true Time Zero replacement, personally (boy, I bet I will get some raised eyebrows with that statement).

5) What are your favorite subjects to photograph?

Landscapes, architecture, and still lives. Still lifes? Those too. I’ve never been a big fan of doing portraiture, but that has slowly been something that’s becoming more interesting to me.

6) Tell us about a project you’re working on.

I’ve never done a formal project. I’ve always felt that it would take some of the fun out of photography for me, and I got into it for a fun creative escape from the university design studio setting—no deadlines, no project guidelines, no restrictions. I would like to take portraits of the group of instant shooters that I have become closest to, though. Fantastic looking people, all of ‘em.

7) Who are your favorite photographers, instant or otherwise?

I’m leaving far too many people out…but here goes (grab a snack):

Chris Paquette and Grant Hamilton are two I have to mention first as it was features of their work (in the same issue of JPG magazine) that got me interested in photography, particularly instant photography. Both had work that was far from what I associated with instant film, and were directly responsible for the start of my own addiction. A Flickr user that many will be familiar with is The Gentleman Amateur—fantastically moody work that evokes cinematic stills. Andy Jenkins. Ben Parks. Kelly Knaga. Cait Youngquist. Lou Noble. Tod Brilliant. Annie Bowerman. Sol Lange. Flickrer pennyfelts. Whitney Johnson and Dave Tuttle (slowly merging into one photographic super-power). Sandra (lavueltaaldia on Flickr). Sean Tubridy. Kate Pulley. Ritchard Ton. Trask Bedortha. Laura Watt. Leah Reich. Dan Ryan. Enrique Woolfolk. Rebekka Guoleifsdottir (that’s without the Icelandic accents). Reilly Lievers. Phil Bebbington (Flickr’s fantastic Terrorkitten). Gary Isaacs. Jeff Rinehart. Katie West. Patrick Schmidt. Kristamas Klousch. original_ann and her sister sMacshots. Michael Kenna. Nicholas Hughes. Adam Makarenko. Bill Vaccaro. Jason Evans (The Daily Nice). Kris Brandhagen. Kris Brandhagen (she’s worth mentioning twice). The usual classic masters.

8) If you could take a photo of anyone or anything what would it be?

Oh…portraits of more of the fine folks that I have met through the medium (so far, I’ve taken two, and only one was actually good). Maybe a double rainbow. My fantastic and wonderfully photogenic roommate. More cats. Sexy vintage cars. Mountains. Lakes. Rivers. Oceans. Beaches. Beach babes. Beach dudes. Fancy pipes. Tattoos. John Waters. Edwin Land’s ghost. Rabbits. Roosters. Old buildings. Old people. Bacon. Nothing at all. Everything.

About Justin

Justin is currently living in Saskatchewan, working as a freelance graphic designer. He thinks the film vs digital argument is ridiculous, and prefers the Rolling Stones to the Beatles.

To see more of Justin’s work, please visit his Flickr photostream

No. 460

8 Exposures...with Daniel G. Fuster

Patrick Tobin, | 1534 days ago

Welcome back to 8 Exposures, our instant film Q&A series. This week, our featured photographer is Daniel G. Fuster

1) What kind of Polaroid camera(s) do you use?

A great thing about instant photography is that cameras are usually easy to find and quite affordable. I have to admit to having many of them, but, at the end, I usually stick to an old SX-70 Sonar and a more recent SLR 690 camera. These last weeks I am also using a flashy blue Impulse.

2) Why do you like instant photography?

I like its colours, the texture, the frame, the way it captures light, but the fact that you can see – and touch – the result immediately is to me, the best thing about instant photography. I also enjoy the difficulties that this kind of photography has, in terms of need of light, limited capacity to use lens, etc. as I believe that this brings more simplicity and spontaneity to pictures. I also like the nostalgic feeling that this material often has, not to say the accidental trait that, time to time, does appear.

3) What is your earliest memory of instant film?

My grandmother bought a Polaroid camera in the early eighties, and she used to take pictures of both my sister and me in the summertime. Since then, I have always associated instant film with holidays, family, friends and plenty of sun. Some years later, I was lucky enough to find this camera in an old cabinet, and then my passion towards instant photography immediately began!

4) What’s your favorite Impossible film type?

I have to say that using Impossible film has been like learning a new language, with its difficulties and its joys. I am currently using a lot of the PX 100 Silver Shade UV+ film. I love it, and I think that in brings the best black & white results ever had on integral film.

5) What are your favorite subjects to photograph?

I have to admit that I am fond of subjects that can be considered as being quite boring! I love big buildings, empty streets, old cars, open landscapes, lonely trees, in fact I think that like anything related to loneliness. Ah, and I also love to take pictures of shadows and reflections.

6) Tell us about a project you’re working on

Besides my flickr account and my blog on instant photography, I recently started a new blog in which pictures are always taken through the same window. I feel quite happy with the results, as I believe that it shows how rich, diverse and exciting can be instant film. I recently also tried to mix music and instant photography.

7) Who are your favorite photographers, instant or otherwise?

I like many photographers, such as Joachim Brohm, William Eggleston, Jeff Wall, but I had to choose one, I would definitively pick Bernard Plossu. I love all his work, and more particularly his travelling photography in black & white. I also enjoy a lot following the work of contemporary instant photographers and, in that respect, flickr and polanoid provide a unique opportunity to access to beautiful instant photography.

8) If you could take a photo of anyone or anything what would it be?

I would have loved to take a picture of Buster Keaton, but I guess that I am a little too late for this…More than specific subjects, I have countries to which I would like to bring my camera, like Vietnam, Morocco, Madagascar, Peru, Bolivia and many others. Another subject on which I would like to work is a series of hand portraits.

About Daniel

Daniel G Fuster is from Barcelona, Spain, and he is currently living in Madrid. Analogue enthusiast, he devotes his free time to instant photography and super 8 films.

To see more of Daniel’s photography, please visit his Flickr photostream. You can also follow him on Twitter at @dfuster74

No. 456

8 Exposures...with Laura Alice Watt

Patrick Tobin, | 1538 days ago

Welcome back to 8 Exposures, our instant film Q&A series. This week, we bring you California-based Laura Alice Watt

Q1) What kind of Polaroid camera(s) do you use?

A: The workhorse is my trusty SLR 680, looking a bit worse for wear these days as it’s usually my travel Polaroid. It’s kept company by a tan SX-70 (such an elegant creation!), a Spectra and an Automatic 250, plus packfilm camera backs for the Hasselblad and, most recently, Crown Graphic. Plenty of fine cams to choose from!

Q2) Why do you like instant photography?

A: There’s of course the relatively-instant gratification (compared to regular film, not digital) of seeing them develop, and the sheer tangibility of a pola, that it’s both an image and an object; for me, the biggest allure is the way these cameras and films “see.” Light glows differently through instant film than through any other kind, there’s just nothing else like it—all those Pola-Droid apps are sad, sad imitations at best—real instant film provides a unique and characteristic view of the world, a way of seeing the subject that directly enhances and contributes to its beauty or intrigue. And I like that sense of interaction, not only between photographer and subject but also through the distinctive medium of the film—and of course the serendipity.

Q3) What is your earliest memory of instant film?

A: I’m perhaps a bit unusual among instant photographers, in that I don’t have any nostalgic memories of polaroids from the past; both of my parents are fairly serious amateur photographers, and didn’t hold Polaroid in very high esteem when I was a kid, so my first camera was an Instamatic, followed by a Pentax. I suppose my earliest memory of instant film was seeing friends’ polaroids at school, but my first real experience with instant film was only five or six years ago, when I bought a One600 Ultra after admiring friends’ polaroids on Flickr. That was quickly replaced by a Spectra given to me by the fabulous Cate Rachford (later a co-founder of ‘Roid Week), who couldn’t stand seeing me not have a “real” Polaroid camera, and suddenly instant film and I took off together.

Q4) What’s your favorite Impossible film type?

A: I’m not sure I’ve settled on a favorite yet – they’ve all had their moments! Although I have to admit, I couldn’t care less about the frames; what’s important is the film. I was honored to be one of the testers of the very first incarnations of what became PX 100 and PX 600, and the sheer delight of NEW INSTANT FILM, after Polaroid’s unhappy demise, can’t be measured. The first beta-batch of PX 680 was pretty extraordinary, popping with clear rich colors. I still sometimes miss the weird misty-blues of the early PX 70, before “Push” came along (I’ve just never been a big one for pinks and purples). When the monochrome films work just right, they’re hauntingly, unreproduceably beautiful. And I’m always curious about the next batch that Impossible might cook up, especially as they’re honing in on improved stability and clarity—plus secretly wishing they can reinvent Choco 100 somehow…!!

Q5) What are your favorite subjects to photograph?

A: Hmm…I seem to take a lot of pictures of water, although not so many recently. Lots of trees, and rambling landscapes. Hard to go wrong with a magnolia. My REAL favorite subjects are my niece and nephew, but they live on the other side of the continent, so we don’t work together as often as I’d like! And if it seems like it’ll make an interesting photograph, I’ll try almost any subject.

Q6) Tell us about a project you’re working on.

A: I moved into a new house last year, and it’s nestled in among these truly fantastic oak trees, all twisty and gnarled branches reaching in every direction—so I seem to photographing them a bunch. Not sure they’re quite a project yet. I’ve also been slowly assembling a group of pastoral images, trying to convey the deep relationships between people and the land they work with—and trying (not necessarily succeeding, mind you) to portray them without getting lost in too much nostalgia or rosy-eyed romance. Instant films, of various sorts, seem to fit that project better than other mediums, although I’m gradually learning some alt-process printing methods, too.

Q7) Who are your favorite photographers, instant or otherwise?

A: Hard to choose, there are so many amazing ones! In my stack of photo-books, I keep reaching back to the Carleton Watkins images of the early early west, to Tina Modotti’s incredibly clear-eyed portraits, to Sally Mann’s heart-drenched landscapes and family chronicles. I think it was a Michael Kenna photo-calendar that I stumbled across years ago that first made me realize that “nature” photography was not restricted to Sierra Club calendars. And I’m kind of obsessed lately by Lynn Davis’ icebergs, plus the incredible flowers of Ron van Dongen. I’m a big photo-fan.

But mostly I’m a fan of the people who I sometimes go photographing WITH—Nick Morrison and Cate Rachford here in the Bay Area, Rom in NYC—they inspire me to see more, and differently, and there’s nothing better than a day spent out and about with cameras. And always looking forward to going shooting with someone new.

Q8) If you could take a photo of anyone or anything what would it be?

A: Whatever’s in front of me that seems intriguing…I’m easy.

About Laura

“I’m a professor of environmental studies and planning at Sonoma State University, at the northern end of the San Francisco Bay Area—where I’ve lived (in a variety of zip codes) since I was two, and have been photographing since I was eight.”

Thanks to Laura for taking part! To see more of her photography, please visit her Flickr Photostream and follow her on Twitter at @lawatt

No. 452

8 Exposures...with Pierre Manning

Patrick Tobin, | 1541 days ago

Hello again, 8 Exposures fans. This week, we are happy to bring you Canadian photographer Pierre Manning

1) What kind of Polaroid camera(s) do you use?

SX-70

2) Why do you like instant photography?

The suprise, the tones, the richness of colors.

3) What is your earliest memory of instant film?

I remember my mother gave me my first Polaroid and it was a revelation for me to see my images developing in front of my eyes.

4) What’s your favorite Impossible film type?

PX-70. I also liked Polaroid’s Fade To Black that Impossible sold.

5) What are your favorite subjects to photograph?

Women ;-)

6) Tell us about a project you’re working on.

Shooting for a footwear company . 6 days of shooting and working with the SX-70 for inserts.

7) Who are your favorite photographers, instant or otherwise?

Richard Avedon / Nick Knight

8) If you could take a photo of anyone or anything what would it be?

Charlize Theron.

About Pierre

Photographer and partner, known for his portraits, his light, his efficiency, his organizational abilities, his speed, and his sense of humour. A Swiss Army Knife in the studio, he keeps up the morale of the troops, is outspoken, and sings old hit songs. Wouldn’t trade the gang, the cyclo, the terrace, his parking space, and team meetings for anything else. Founder and member of the image makers since 1989.

No. 437

8 Exposures...with Tyler Tyndell

Patrick Tobin, | 1552 days ago

Welcome back to 8 Exposures, our popular instant film Q&A series. This week, we turn our lens on Texas teacher and photographer Tyler Tyndell

1) What kind of Polaroid camera(s) do you use?

The truth is that by the time this interview runs, it will have changed. Realizing the potential for all Polaroid camera models to be useful, I acquire them readily. Of course, my SX-70 is with me at all times as well as two 250 Land Cameras. Being as it is, when my SX-70 needs troubleshooting, my father-in-law is kind enough to lend me one of his. Other cameras that are usually with me are an SX-70 Pronto and a Polaroid Spectra.

2) Why do you like instant photography?

Can I give a dissertation? In all seriousness, instant photography breathes creativity. For me it provides an avenue for creativity that I would have never been exposed to otherwise. I believe the addictive quality induced from instant photography is best explained by truly understanding the magnitude of what happens the moment you press the shutter. It could be everything or nothing that you imagined. The 35-year-old camera could false shoot and you may end up transferring the pack to another camera, just to harvest the image. There is a delightful quality to the possibility of failure and the subsequent pursuit of a single image that is worth the time to stop, breath, see and hold.

3) What is your earliest memory of instant film?

Regretfully, I only have faint memories of a Polaroid 600 camera in our house as a child. However, I delight in the serendipitous events that led me to a garage sale one early morning last winter. I bought a Polaroid 600 OneStep for 25 cents having heard that “I think there is a company making film for those now,” and embarked on the journey that has led me here. Ask my daughter that question in 25 years. Thankfully, she’ll have a completely different answer and plenty of Impossible images to show for it.

4) What’s your favorite Impossible film type?

Having cut my teeth on PX 680 FF, I feel obligated to comment on the noteworthy and unmatched characteristics of such a lovely film. To date I am most attached to the PX 70 12/11 batch and its consistency. Again and again the colors and tonal range come through for me, which is important in being able to utilize it in personal work as well as professional jobs.

5) What are your favorite subjects to photograph?

People. As a portrait photographer, the need to capture and convey the expression of a face or a body transfers very naturally to instant film. It always amazes me how people respond to having their photo taken with an SX-70 versus my DSLR. There is a certain non-threatening comfort to it. More specifically, my daughter Pyper. It is important for me to know that she’ll have a new generation of instant photos that captured her life. I keep a PX 70 shot of her in the dashboard of my car.

6) Tell us about a project you’re working on.

Well I wrote a short story over 2 years ago and it’s just sitting there on a flash drive. I had plans to collaborate with some artist friends of mine to illustrate it, but it never took off. That was before I had fallen into this relationship with photography and instant film. Now I realize how great it is that it never actually happened. I will be using Impossible film to produce the images that will accompany the story. I’ve found that giving myself deadlines for personal work can be dangerous. These things need to happen naturally and very thoughtfully.

7) Who are your favorite photographers, instant or otherwise?

Being a young photographer and even more green in the world of instant photography, I have to say that most of my favorite instant photographers are those that are active in the Flickr and Twitter community. My father-in-law and fellow instant fanatic Troy Bradford provides constant inspiration and technical direction as well as Illustrative Photographer and friend Nick Minton. Other photographers whose work I greatly admire are Eric Ryan Anderson & my friend Sean Berry, who both utilize instant film in their work. Also Jeremy Cowart for his humanitarian and creative approach to photography. I need not forget to mention Adam Goldberg with his endless stream of introspective double exposures and photographic musings.

8) If you could take a photo of anyone or anything what would it be?

Thom Yorke of Radiohead. I’ve been saying this for years. It is no secret how he feels about media, cameras and such; which is what makes the idea of taking his portrait so desirable. You don’t just take a picture of a guy like that. You would have to really develop the photographer/subject relationship. I think he’d dig to have his photo on Impossible film.

About Tyler

People are lots of things. I am a teacher and coordinate an afterschool program here in Greenville, TX. I am a portrait and wedding photographer. Mostly I am a husband to my beautiful wife and father to my beautiful daughter. I do what I have to do, so that I can keep doing what I want to do, and that is taking pretty pictures.

To see more of Tyler’s work, visit his wedding photography website at suffixweddings.com and his Tumblr. You can also follow him on Twitter at @tylertyndell

No. 428

8 Exposures...with Heather Polley

Patrick Tobin, | 1559 days ago

Photo by Nick and Dave Photography

It’s time for another foray into 8 Exposures territory. This entry revolves around California photographer Heather Polley

1) What kind of Polaroid camera(s) do you use?

I have several folding SX-70s, as well as a plastic box-type Pronto SX-70. For pack film, I shoot an Automatic 104 Land Camera. My dad is conveniently a vintage camera dealer. He recently gave me three Spectra cameras that are so new to me, I haven’t had a chance to shoot them yet.

2) Why do you like instant photography?

Instant film breathed new life into my work. I’ve always been an analog photographer, and I work a lot with alternative print processes because the element of chance brings a freshness and beauty that you don’t often see in digital work. I like happy accidents and imperfections. I shot with 35mm film for many years, but I have found that shooting instant film adds a new layer of complexity to my compositions.

3) What is your earliest memory of instant film?

Most of the pictures my parents took of me as a child were with a Polaroid camera, probably a One Step. It was there for every milestone and event while I was growing up.

4) What’s your favorite Impossible film type?

I’m partial to the PX 100 Silver Shade, especially the generation right after the First Flush. I just love the way it responds to temperature (especially cold) and atmospheric changes. I experimented with blasting the PX 100 First Flush with a hair dryer, which is why a lot of my earlier pieces have a higher contrast and a redder color.

5) What are your favorite subjects to photograph?

I photographed architecture for many years, but lately I’ve been working more with still life and landscapes. I’m drawn to anything without a person in the frame, basically!

6) Tell us about a project you’re working on.

I scanned some of my still lifes taken with the PX 100 First Flush and made platinum/palladium prints on tissue paper for a series called Twice Removed. I have another series of color still lifes taken with Fade To Black Film. I’m also working on a series of landscapes taken in Pt. Reyes north of San Francisco with Type 100 Chocolate film and various generations of Silver Shade film.

7) Who are your favorite photographers, instant or otherwise?

My favorite photographers are Eugene Atget, Hiroshi Sugimoto, Todd Hido, and I love the series Attracted to Light by Doug and Mike Starn. I recently saw a retrospective of Francesca Woodman’s work at SFMOMA that knocked me out. Many anonymous 19th-century daguerreotypes and albumen prints have had the biggest impact on my alternative processes work. I’ve also gotten inspiration from Japanese woodblock prints and Dutch still life paintings.

My favorite instant photographers are probably contemporaries on Flickr. David Sankey’s work was the first work I saw on the PX 100 First Flush film, oddly enough on Asthmatic Kitty Records’ website. I credit him with my discovery of The Impossible Project and all my work that came from it. I also love the work of Andrew Millar, Laura Watt, Ludwig West, Amanda Mason, and JL Pictures.

8) If you could take a photo of anyone or anything what would it be?

I would love to have an entire day to photograph the interior of The Paramount Theatre, a spectacular Art Deco movie palace in Oakland, CA.

About Heather

I am a San Francisco-based fine-art photographer and manager of a boutique that represents local artisans. I am also an absolute music obsessive, and I have been thinking about trying performance photography.

To see more of Heather’s work, please visit her Flickr photostream, her Facebook page and her Tumblr. You can also follow her on Twitter at @sfphotogirl.

No. 418

8 Exposures...with Thomas Krauss

Patrick Tobin, | 1566 days ago

Hello, Impossibles! Welcome back to 8 Exposures, our instant film Q&A series. This entry brings you photographic Frenchman Thomas Krauss

Q1) What kind of Polaroid camera(s) do you use?

A: From the moment I fell for instantaneous photographs I‘ve tried different ones, but mostly those that use 600 film. The very first one, the trigger, the Archduke of Austria, was the fruit of an exchange for a Holga. Lately I’ve mostly been using an SLR 680, a 690, and an instant Type 100 back for my 4×5 camera.

Q2) Why do you like instant photography?

A: I honestly don’t know, my banker is after me. My wife and him agree so much in restraining my buying frenzy that I’m beginning to think there’s something between them…My photographs lack perfection. I don’t master any of the parameters at shooting…

Q3) What is your earliest memory of instant film?

A: The one and only time during my childhood when I used a Polaroid was for Manu’s birthday. Manu was the little fair-haired boy who lived opposite us. (Since then he has grown and moved).
The boy I’ve always known.
The boy I cycled with.
The boy I watched the Tour de France withthe boy who made me hate the Tour de France.
The boy I played Monopoly withthe boy who made me hate Monopoly…So maybe he’s the one who made me hate birthdays and love Polaroid!

Q4) What’s your favorite Impossible film type?

A: Meat is my hobby-horse. The colour of meat. I’ve always been attracted to colour. When I started trying to feed my SLR 680, I naturally went for the PX 680 that was newly produced by Impossible…since then we’ve lived happily together and had plenty of children!

Q5) What are your favorite subjects to photograph?

A: I started taking pictures 5 years ago. When my oldest girl was born. I can truly say that my two daughters are my favourite subjects.
I always come back to them as photographic subjects.
It’s as if they were the centre of a spiral.
I need to get away from them in order to succeed in my coming-back.

Q6) Tell us about a project you’re working on.

A: As it is often the case since I’ve been doing instantaneous pictures, I got the idea from Polaroid. However I’m moving this project onto a 6×7 format.
To cut it shortpeople with an outstanding backside!

Q7) Who are your favorite photographers, instant or otherwise?

A: I have very few if not little photographic references…however here would be my winners: the gold medal would go to Richard Avedon – I don’t think I need to justify my choice…The silver medal would be for Saul Leiter (I discovered him through my talented and friend photographer Pierre Belhassen. I would need a lot of bronze medals to give to those who inspire me day after day and who are not as well known as the two first winners!

Q8) If you could take a photo of anyone or anything what would it be?

A: If we could bring back to life someone, I think I would love to shoot Daniel Emilfork. Once you’ve found him on Google pictures , you’ll understand why.

About Thomas

I live near Perpignan. I’m a dad, a spouse, a son, a friend… and sometimes a mathematic teacher!

Thank you very much to Thomas for taking part in 8 Exposures! To see more of his work, please visit his Flickr Photostream

No. 379

8 Exposures...with Lou Noble

Patrick Tobin, | 1587 days ago

Welcome back to 8 Exposures, our instant film Q&A series! This week, we bring you polaroid portrait wizard Lou Noble

Q1) What kind of Polaroid camera(s) do you use?

A: I use two Polaroid cameras, a Polaroid SLR 680 and an SX-70. I’ve got loads in my apartment, but they’re decorative more than anything else. I’ve gone through my packfilm period, my simple Polaroid period, used a Big Shot for a bit. But there’s just nothing like the SX-70 and its kin that fits me better, the amount of control I like, the quality I require, the form factor, hell, even the little noises the motors make in the SLR 680, that there is music to my ears.

Q2) Why do you like instant photography?

A: I love it because it’s utterly unique. Unique in the pictures that are created, in the interactions using such strange cameras creates between you and your subject, unique in the palette, in the creation of a physical artifact. I’ve been using Polaroid since 1996, it’s been with me for, well, for the majority of my life. Polaroid is responsible for my love of photography.

And it’s not really about film, it’s about Instant film. It’s about having it immediately, about creating this little piece of work that you made mere moments ago, and having it in your hands, showing the person you photographed what you saw, that this picture right here is how I see you.

Q3) What is your earliest memory of instant film?

A: I was around 18, found my mom’s Sun 600 in her closet, after reading about one in a Stephen King story. Used that thing for years, until it stopped working while at summer camp. Stopped working at just the right time, though. Jesus, writing that, I realized I’ve been shooting with instant film my entire adult life. Heavy.

Q4) What’s your favorite Impossible film type?

A: Tough one. My favorite type of Impossible film, so far, is the PX 680 FF. I’ve found it really consistent, I’m digging the way the colors change with the color temperature.

Q5) What are your favorite subjects to photograph?

A: People. Always. Only. With me, that’s what photography is for, it’s a way of getting to know people, connect with people. It’s an excuse to hang out with someone, to ask ‘em all sorts of questions, to investigate, interview, interact.

Q6) Tell us about a project you’re working on.

A: I’m currently finishing up a project on couples, a book I’ve been working on since last year. Went around the country last summer, interviewed and photographed dozens of couples about their relationships, why they work, how they deal with conflicts, how certain factors affect them. Hope to be finished in the next month or so!

Q7) Who are your favorite photographers, instant or otherwise?

A: In no particular order: Richard Avedon, Julia Galdo, Kevin Mason, Laura Taylor, Autumn De Wilde, Aaron Feaver, Martin Schoeller, Ian Broyles, Ryan McGinley, Annie Liebovitz. I adore the way each of them capture people, all vastly different, but all thoroughly engaging. They’ve all got styles that are very much their own, that I can pick out of a crowd of photos. That counts for a lot, in my book. Being able to bring your own personality to bear on a photograph in such a way that it’s your own, that in an artistic field that’s as crowded as photography you can stand out, that’s the ideal. That’s what these folks are able to do with aplomb. There’s lots of good photographers out there, lots of folks who can take a pretty picture, but these folks show me something about their subjects, show me something far richer than just a pretty picture.

I like lots of of photographers, but these folks, hands down, all-time favorites.

Q8) If you could take a photo of anyone or anything what would it be?

A: President Obama. Or my grandfather, who passed away about sixteen years ago. He was a photographer, never got to see me pick it up.

About Lou

“I was born, raised and hope to one day die in Los Angeles. I work as a set medic.”

Special thanks to Lou for taking part in 8 Exposures. To see more of his work, please visit his site, www.louobedlam.com

No. 361

8 Exposures...with Emilie Lefellic.

Patrick Tobin, | 1601 days ago

Hi there. Welcome back to 8 Exposures, our instant film Q & A series! This week, we bring to you Parisian photog Emilie Lefellic

1) What kind of Polaroid camera(s) do you use?

Mainly my 180 and my SX70 model 2, which are my two favorite cameras.

2) Why do you like instant photography?

What I love about instant photography is its completely unpredictable character, the whimsical suprises it creates whenever you click the button. I also love the fact that development takes place before your eyes and you can even influence it once you know the film. As the awesome 101 Impossible Ways Project shows, instant photography leaves infinite room for experimentation and creativity – before, while and after the picture is taken : you can decide to double-expose, use special filters, put your picture in the fridge, in the oven, write, draw, paint, stick stuff on it, create artifacts with it – I actually feel a bit like a craftswoman when I fiddle with my pictures, which is a great source of joy. But what I love above all in instant photography is the instant film itself : its colour, depth, painterly texture, its retro feel – it alters reality in a way that is surreal, dreamy and poetical to me. Somehow, it’s perfect in its many imperfections.

3) What is your earliest memory of instant film?

My parents used to have a Polaroid 1000 Land Camera when I was a kid. It was a very basic camera, but it seemed magical to me, back then.

4) What’s your favorite Impossible film type?

I’ve had the immense honor of testing the very first generation of silver shade films by the Impossible Project back in February 2010. I am amazed at the progress Impossible has made since then – especially with the colour films, which have always been my favorite. My favorite so far has to be PX 680 FF, but I haven’t tested the new PX 70 film, which I’ve heard is even better. I also secretly hope that Impossible will come up with new peel-apart film some day, to replace 669 polaroid film.

5) What are your favorite subjects to photograph?

There are so many things I like and would like to shoot – I have a special fondness for women’s portraits, hats, dresses, flowers, clocks, Parisian streets and architecture, childhood, animals, tiny objects, lonely houses… I also love signs and everything that contains words and letters – graffiti, street names, notebooks… I love writing on my pictures, too.

6) Tell us about a project you’re working on.

I’m not working on any project right now, but there are lots of things I dream of doing. First, I’d love to find the time (and money, I guess) to set a proper shooting in a nice, refined place with a beautiful female model. I’ve never actually dared to hire someone but that’s something I’d like to do. I’d also love to go on working in collaboration with musicians – I’ve done a couple of band pictures / CD artworks and it’s been a great experience. I believe music and polaroids work very well together – I’ve edited a couple of music videos based on polaroids, and I’d love to do more of that, too. Finally, I hope to find the time to work on a new book of polaroids !

7) Who are your favorite photographers, instant or otherwise?

I don’t know a lot about photography and photographers, but I love the works of Miroslav Tichy, Sarah Moon, Wendy Beaver, Stefanie Schneider and Cathleen Naundorf, whose polaroids I discovered recently. I also love Andrei Tarkovski’s book of polaroids. But mostly, as far as instant photography is concerned, the work I enjoy the most is that of the amazing people I’ve met through Flickr and the likes – professional or amateurs, I don’t even know: people like Neil Krug, Parker Fitzgerald, Corinne Héraud, Mélanie Rodriguez, Franck Juery, The Gentleman Amateur, Eduardo Martinez, Ludwig West, Dan Ryan, Carmen Devos, Esther Z.Schnickenacke, Marion Lanciaux, Brian Henry, Bastian and Julia, Alix Berard (m6), and so many others I’m forgetting but whose work inspires me everyday…

8) If you could take a photo of anyone or anything what would it be?

I love the aesthetics of the Victorian period – for quite some time now, I’ve had this fantasy of shooting something 19th century-England with real costumes and settings, something romantic, Jane Campion / Emilie Brontë style. I’m not quite sure how to make this happen though :)

About Emilie

“I’m 32, I’m from Paris, I teach English and linguistics at university and I’ve been into Instant photography for about 5 years.”

Merci to Emilie for taking part in 8 Exposures! To purchase her book of instant film photographs, click HERE

No. 349

8 Exposures...with Maritza de la Vega

Patrick Tobin | 1608 days ago

Hello, instanteers! Welcome back to 8 Exposures, our instant film Q & A series. This entry focuses on New York-based Maritza de la Vega

1) What kind of Polaroid camera(s) do you use?

Primarily I use an SX-70 Alpha, and an SLR 680 SE for integral film and a 440 for pack film. I recently acquired a Keystone 60 Second Everflash (a non-Polaroid pack film camera) that I really like to use and that is slowly replacing my 440. I have a few other Polaroid cameras but I don’t really use them very often.

2) Why do you like instant photography?

I like that it is instant, of course, but also that it’s tangible. It’s great to hold an image in my hand and admire it without the aid of a brightly lit screen!

3) What is your earliest memory of instant film?

I don’t have specific early memories of instant film, but I do feel that it was a constant part of my world especially from the late seventies through the mid-nineties. I did acquire a one-step 600 in the nineties, but not sure how. I have a very few polaroids from that time period. Then in 2009, just as Polaroid was discontinuing 600 film, my father-in-law decided to clean out his attic. He found his old SX-70 and an automatic 320, along with a few other film cameras, and gave them to me. Thus, my Polaroid adventure truly began.

4) What’s your favorite Impossible Project film type?

I love color so PX 680 is my favorite. I also like the new PX 70, especially indoors, and I really enjoyed using the PZ 600 UV+ when my Spectra was still in working condition.

5) What are your favorite subjects to photograph?

Woodlands, bodies of water, my home and sometimes my kids. Mostly, I just photograph ordinary, everyday places and things that for some reason move me to take up my camera and use it.

6) Tell us about a project you’re working on.

I am not a planner, so I don’t really work on projects, but in selecting photographs for this post, I realized that I have made hundreds of photographs of the preserved natural places in my area. I live in a county with many local and state parks filled with lakes and trees. I hike regularly and always have a camera with me.

7) Who are your favorite photographers, instant or otherwise?

I enjoy the work of William Eggleston, Joel Meyerowitz, and Stephen Shore, to name just a few. In terms of instant film, I do admire the polaroids of Walker Evans and the thousand polaroids of Philip-Lorca diCorcia. I also follow the works of many, many inspired instant photographers on flickr and polanoid.

8) If you could take a photo of anyone or anything what would it be?

There’s nothing specifically that I would like to photograph. I just walk around waiting for something to move me, to stop me in my tracks.

About Maritza

“I was born in Cuba, raised on the mean streets of NYC and currently reside in a small hamlet in Rockland County, NY with my family. I have the good fortune of working at a small law firm just two miles from home. When I am not working, driving my kids around or photographing my world, I read a lot, knit and sew on occasion and grow vegetables in the warmer months. I also volunteer at a local community garden that helps feed those in need. I don’t sleep much.”

Thanks to Maritza for taking part in 8 Exposures! To see more of her photography, please visit http://maritzadelavega.tumblr.com/

No. 340

8 Exposures...with Andy Jenkins.

Patrick Tobin | 1615 days ago

Hello, friends. We’re back again with another entry in our popular instant film Q & A series, 8 Exposures. This week, we bring you Ohio’s own Andy Jenkins

1) What kind of Polaroid camera(s) do you use?

I mainly use my SX-70 Sonar, 440, Graflex Crown Graphic and my 110a converted to take pack film. I also mix in several other SX-70s with their own quirks, a couple 250s, one600, Supercolor 635 CL, Big Swinger 3000, Polaroid Reporter, Square Shooter 2, and Holgaroid back.

2) Why do you like instant photography?

I like the artistic outlet instant photography provides. The nuances of each type of film and camera allows for so many creative options. I know some people would just give up on a film like Push!, but personally, taking the mundane and transforming it to something else is what makes it fun. I like Jack White’s quote regarding his guitars, “I wanna work and battle it and conquer it and make it express whatever attitude I have at that moment. I want it to be a struggle.”

3) What is your earliest memory of instant film?

I remember making Mother’s Day cards when I was probably 10 years old using my mom’s Supercolor 635 CL (which I still use currently). Neon shirts, parachute pants and Air Jordans really popped on old Polaroid 600 film.

4) What’s your favorite Impossible film type?

The PX 680 beta is hands down my favorite. I still have one box left I’m waiting to shoot when the grey skies of Ohio leave in the spring. The new PX 70 test film is really nice as well.

5) What are your favorite subjects to photograph?

When it’s nice out, I like to take full advantage of a day. I enjoy shooting around a lot of the metro parks and hiking trails in Ohio. Not a lot of people around so it’s nice to slow down and just enjoy the outdoors. I usually have my 440 with me as rural decay can pop up pretty much anywhere in the Midwest.

6) Tell us about a project you’re working on.

I recently put together a book of my favorite peel apart shots from 2011 entitled, Instant Appropriation. Mainly did it for family and friends to pretend I somewhat know what I’m doing. For 2012, I’m hoping to try to figure out how to safely navigate a stand up paddleboard while not ruining a camera for some shots from an amphibious perspective of things I see on my way to work everyday.

7) Who are your favorite photographers, instant or otherwise?

Charles Peterson, Lance Mercer, Ian and Erick Regnard, and Art Brewer are several that I really like whether it be due to music or surfing interests. On Flickr I really enjoy The Gentleman Amateur, Bastiank80, moominsean, Ludwigwest, nepumug, and abdukted1456’s stuff to name a few. The morning coffee and their photostreams are always inspiring.

8) If you could take a photo of anyone or anything what would it be?

I’d love to get some of my cameras back to the North Shore of Oahu and the Na Pali coast on Kauai at some point. Easily my favorite places I’ve ever been. A shaved ice, the ocean and instant film…that’s the life.

About Andy:

“I live in Dublin Ohio with my wife and chocolate lab who are patient enough to deal with the fridge being filled with boxes of instant film. My job entails being around the ups and downs of society all day and is reflected in the lack of people in my photography. Photography as a hobby is a nice outlet to get away from the goings on of everyday life.”

Thanks to Andy for taking part in 8 Exposures! To see more of Andy’s photography, please visit http://ercodeblue.tumblr.com/. You can also follow Andy on Twitter at @jenk22

No. 331

8 Exposures...with Laura Taylor.

Patrick Tobin | 1622 days ago

Photo by Lou Noble

Hello, again. Welcome back to 8 Exposures, our instant film interview series. This week, we bring you a lovely lady from the west coast, photographer Laura Taylor

1) Q: What kind of Polaroid camera(s) do you use?

A: The SX-70 is my main camera, though I have a couple other Land cameras that I like to play around with.

2) Q: Why do you like instant photography?

A: It’s just magical to me. I love that the photo is tangible like a small treasure. The element of surprise is fun, too. You never know exactly what to expect because forces out of your control are at play. All of these aspects create a special experience, and beautiful photographs.

3) Q: What is your earliest memory of instant film?

A: When I was in preschool, I had a Polaroid photo taken of me sticking my head through a big wooden cut out clown. I still have that Polaroid.

4) Q: What’s your favorite Impossible Project film type?

A: PX 70 Color Shade. Mmm, color!

5) Q: What are your favorite subjects to photograph?

A: I think I am most happy to shoot the people I love because they are precious to me…a part of who I am and my history. There’s a weight that comes with photographing someone you love and admire.

6) Q: Tell us about a project you’re working on.

A: It’s a big priority for me this year to complete some projects I’ve had in mind for a long time. One is to photograph beauty salons across Los Angeles. My Mom was a hair stylist all through my childhood, and it’s an atmosphere that is really interesting to me.

7) Q: Who are your favorite photographers, instant or otherwise?

A: I have so many! William Eggleston, for sure. I find myself looking at Jody Rogac’s work a lot lately – especially her Polaroids. And I love Autumn de Wilde. She was one of the first photographers that really inspired me when I started taking photos.

8) Q: If you could take a photo of anyone or anything what would it be?

A: Honestly, I would like to feel more comfortable taking photos of strangers. I’m very concerned about being intrusive or making someone feel uncomfortable, but there are so many interesting moments I see that I want to photograph.

About Laura:

“I’m a self-taught photographer from Augusta, Georgia. I started taking photos at the age of 16 with a little digital point and shoot. I’ve lived in Los Angeles for over 3 years, where I work as a freelance photographer. And I love photography very, very much.”

To see more of Laura’s work, please visit her Tumblr and her Flickr Photo Stream

No. 322

8 Exposures...With Matthew Fry.

Patrick Tobin, | 1629 days ago

Hi friends, and welcome back to 8 Exposures, our weekly instant film Q & A series. This entry turns the spotlight on California-based photographer Matthew Fry

Q1) What kind of Polaroid camera(s) do you use?

I have a Polaroid SX-70 Alpha 1 SE with a Polaroid Polatronic 2350 flash. I love it, and it looks as good as it shoots. I used to have a Onestep Closeup 600, but I gave that to Nettie Harris after a shoot. Actually, I guess I have two other 600s somewhere around here. That’s the great thing about Polaroids, someone always has one laying around from back in the day.

Q2) Why do you like instant photography?

I think most everyone would say that it gives them something tangible in a world consumed by digital. But I only shoot film, so instant is my version of digital. I don’t have to wait days to see it, I have it there in my hands the moment I shoot it. And I always love the anticipation as it turns from blue, slowly forming the shapes and colors. It’s like opening a christmas present for me.

Q3) What is your earliest memory of instant film?

I was just talking to my wife about this. You should have seen her face when she described how she couldn’t leave it alone, she had to shake it and play with it. She doesn’t even remember what the photos were, just the pure enjoyment with the anticipation of what it would become.

Q4) What’s your favorite Impossible film type?

I’m in love with PX 680 Color Shade! Everything about it.. the colors, the textures, the little dots in the dark. My friend Laura, from L’ecole des Femmes said it best, “it takes the subject and turns it into a painting”. I mean, you can take the most boring wall and end up with the most beautiful textures and subtle colors. It’s a work of art. It’s not perfect and that’s why I love it.

Q5) What are your favorite subjects to photograph?

I love to photograph women. I think there’s nothing more beautiful and telling than a morning shoot with someone; in whatever they woke up in, just being themselves in their own place. I love scars and wrinkles and skin.. I love hands and necklines.. I love people as they are. I was just talking with a writer last night who reminded me of something I had been told before, “Take a simple story and tell it complicated”. That’s what I love. I want to tell the story of someone in that moment, as they are.

Q6) Tell us about a project you’re working on.

One project that I hope to start this year is a book based off of a tumblr I have, www.theheroinesproject.com. It would be letters and photos that have been submitted to the site, and some photographs of mine. I want to travel, and shoot women of all shapes and sizes. I want to show beauty in every type, no matter who you are or what you’ve been through.

I have also been doing a lot of work with the clothing line, L’ecole des Femmes, out of Los Angeles. I don’t generally do fashion, but there is such a mutual respect between myself and Laura Sfez, Owner/Designer at L’ecole. She loves what I do and she lets me do my thing; and I love her line, and the girls look amazing in it.

Q7) Who are your favorite photographers, instant or otherwise?

I don’t really follow a lot of photographers, but the only one that comes to mind when talking about instant is a close friend of mine. She is the one that introduced me to The Impossible Project and she shoots the most beautiful images. Her name is Rachel Shimizu and she shot one of my favorite images ever. It’s of the Brooklyn Bridge, and though it’s been shot more than I can count, I’ve never seen one like this.

Q8) If you could take a photo of anyone or anything what would it be?

I’m not really sure about this one…

I would love to shoot my wife if she would ever let me! She’s not big at all on being photographed; I just wish I could show her how beautiful she is… other than my wife, i’m pretty happy with the people that I have worked with. most everyone I really want to shoot, I have already or I am already scheduled to shoot. Though there are a few that I really wish I could travel to shoot. Not models or famous, just some great people in my life.

About Matt

I grew up mostly in Dallas, Texas and spent four years in the Navy. I love environmental portraiture and a little fashion every now and then. I’m happily married, residing in Echo Park, California.

To see more of Matthew’s photography, visit his Facebook page and his Tumblr

No. 310

8 Exposures ... with Jarrod Renaud

Patrick Tobin, | 1637 days ago

Welcome, friends, to another foray into instant-filmdom, via our popular interview series 8 Exposures! This week, we turn the spotlight on Jarrod Renaud

1) Q: What kind of Polaroid camera(s) do you use?

A: A Polaroid 195 and Polaroid SX-70 Alpha 1.

2) Q: Why do you like instant photography?

A: It’s analog and it’s instant. I shoot a lot of 35mm film also, but have the hardest time being patient when it comes to waiting for development and scans. With Polaroid, it’s like Christmas morning with every shot. I love that I’ve got something physical in my hand at the end of a shoot. I also feel like you automatically capture a sense of nostalgia with the slight inconsistency of film and the general color palette.

3) Q: What is your earliest memory of instant film?

A: Growing up, I never had a Polaroid stuck in my face, there was never one laying around, although my parents took a million photos. It was all point/shoot and SLR cameras. So my first real experience with one was a Polaroid Auto 100 that I found at a thrift shop. I stuck it on my shelf at home because I thought it looked awesome. After my first daughter was born I had picked up a Diana+ so I could have something a bit different then the digital point and shoot we had…that opened my eyes to analog photography and then at some point I realized I could get film for the Polaroid 100 and that it just needed a battery to work. I was hooked.??

4) Q: What’s your favorite Impossible Project film type?

A: Right now it’s the PX 680 Gold Frame. I love the look of it, super contrasty. I’m really looking forward to IP film development; they’ve already come a long way.

5) Q: What are your favorite subjects to photograph?

A: I started with just my family a few years ago, mainly my kids. It was fun for me and I just thought it would be awesome for them when they grow up to have these images. Over the past couple years I’ve been reaching out to friends, and friends of friends. I just want to photograph people. People are inspiring.

6) Q: Tell us about a project you’re working on.

A: I don’t really have anything specific right now. I usually have a few shoots set up each month. I guess I can say that this year I want to explore communities and general Americana and let that influence my photography with a mix of fashion, as I love style in general. And there is my curiosity towards band photography since music is such a huge part of my life. Always have my earbuds in. Ehhh, I’ll also be taking my cameras on a couple trips with my local church to Costa Rica and Rio. I’m a tad A.D.D. so my attention jumps all over the place in a creative sense. I’m an explorer I guess.

7) Q: Who are your favorite photographers, instant or otherwise?

A: There’s so much talent out there it’s insane. I always keep up with Parker Fitzgerald’s stuff. Other film favorites would be Samuel Bradley and Jon Duenas, along with the lifestyle stuff of Nick Onken.

8) Q: If you could take a photo of anyone or anything what would it be?

A: That’s a hard one. I’d love to photograph Rocky Votolato. His music has had a constant presence in my life for the past 10 years. His albums are the kind that I can listen to anytime, anywhere and in any mood. He’s intriguing, I’d like to get to know him.

About Jarrod

“I just turned 31. I’m married to a gorgeous and encouraging girl and have 3 kiddos; Olive, Boston, and Sailor… oh and a 4th on the way. The house is a bit crazy but quite lovely. I’m currently the Marketing Director for DPA Microphones for North America. My obsession with photography is only growing.”

Special thanks to Jarrod for taking part in 8 Exposures! To see more of his work, please visit his blog at http://thelanternroomblog.com/

No. 298

8 Exposures...with George Weiss III.

Patrick Tobin, | 1650 days ago

Hello, Impossibles! We’re happy to bring you another entry in our ever-popular question and answer series, 8 Exposures. In this episode, the man of the hour is George Weiss III, a photographer based in Philadelphia, specializing in weddings and portraits, with a love for analog photography…

1) Q: What kind of Polaroid camera(s) do you use?

A: I have a bunch, I’m a bit of a hoarder, er, I mean collector, but I primarily use a couple SX-70 Sonars, an SLR 680, and I have a 250 for packfilm.

2) Q: Why do you like instant photography?

A: Hmph, where do I start? I think the biggest reason is the fact that it has a life and a soul that can’t be found in any other medium. I love the feeling of anticipation I get when I’ve taken a photo and I’m waiting for it to develop or to peel it. It’s magic.

3) Q: What is your earliest memory of instant film?

A: I have a lot of pictures of myself as a child (probably in the 3-year-old range) that were taken by my grandfather but I don’t actually remember them being taken. When I was a young child in the 80’s, Polaroid photos were so ubiquitous it was hard to avoid them.

4) Q: What’s your favorite Impossible Project film type?

A: That’s tough. I love the new Gold Frame PX 680 but I think there was something really special about the PX 70 First Flush. Some of my favorite photos were taken on that.

5) Q: What are your favorite subjects to photograph?

A: Anything that inspires me :)

6) Q: Tell us about a project you’re working on.

A: Nothing too serious but I’m trying to come out of my shell and do a little bit more street work.

7) Q: Who are your favorite photographers, instant or otherwise?

A: I think my favorite famous/historic photographer has to be Henri-Cartier Bresson. Since I do a lot of wedding photography, much of my inspiration is from that world. I really love the work of Ash Imagery, and Jose Villa’s stuff is gorgeous as well.

I have a ton of favorite instant photographers and I’m not going to start naming names because I’m afraid I’ll miss someone and regret it, but you only need to look as far as the Impossible Project Flickr group for a huge amount of inspiration. Mikael Kennedy’s work also really speaks to me.

8) Q: If you could take a photo of anyone or anything what would it be?

A: That’s a tough one but one of my heroes is Kurt Vonnegut and I’d love to be able to take his portrait.

Special thanks to George for taking part in 8 Exposures! To see more of his photography, please visit his Flickr Photo Stream?? ??and follow him on Twitter at @themadstork

No. 293

8 Exposures...with Sean Rohde.

Patrick Tobin | 1657 days ago

Hi there, friends! Welcome back to 8 Exposures, our instant film question & answer series. This week, we spoke with Phoenix, AZ-based Sean Rohde

1) Q: What kind of Polaroid camera(s) do you use?

A: Loaded Question! I mostly use my 190 and 195, but I also have a 180, Fuji Fotorama FP-1, Mamiya Universal, Crown Graphic with Polaroid and Fuji backs, SX-70 Model 2 (white), SX-70 Alpha 1 Model 2 (black and modified for 600), Colorpack III, Big Swinger 3000, and some other stuff, plus things I have owned and sold in the past, like a Konica Instant Press and modified roll film cameras, as well as various plastic hard case and folder cameras. I would love to have a 185 to complete my collection, but they seemed to have gone up in value in the past two years to some ridiculous prices. I have to use my cameras, not just look at them on a shelf.

2) Q: Why do you like instant photography?

A: Well, certainly the fact that it is instant is a draw. Though sometimes I don’t peel my 100 and 80 for six hours so I guess they aren’t always so instant. There is just a certain quality that instant films have that film doesn’t have. Color shifts, textures??…??it all kind of gives photos a vintage quality that I like. Plus, there is (was) such a large variety of film types that there are lots of effects to work with that are inherent in the films. ??Chocolate is different than ID-UV, which is different than PX 70, etc. I’ve shot enough Polaroid by now that I know pretty much exactly how to get the look that I want in most lighting situations for different films. ID-UV in sunlight with a filter, Type 672 as the sun sets, etc.

3) Q: What is your earliest memory of instant film?

A: I received what was probably a Super Shooter (plastic hard case Polaroid) in 1978 for my 8th birthday from family friends. I mostly just shot amazing photos of my gerbils, stuffed animals and friends. Nothing too exciting…not exactly a child Polaroid prodigy. But I have quite a few family Polaroids, even some peel-aparts of my pregnant mother and me at a day or so old.

4) Q: What’s your favorite Impossible Project film type?

A: I’m still working on that one! It has been really hit or miss for me so far with a low success rate. I like the black-and-white PX 600 and I ordered some of the test PX 70 recently. I like a lot of what I see from other users so I’m looking forward to something that will survive being shot in Arizona sun without just blowing out. But I really dig the colors that others have been getting from the recent color films.

5) Q: What are your favorite subjects to photograph?

A: Mostly things out in the desert. I like abandonment and decay. But I shoot wherever I am, and really enjoy shooting people. There just aren’t that many people out in the middle of nowhere. I was just in New Mexico, and the entire state has a lower population than Phoenix, AZ, and most of the people here live in Phoenix, so a lot of the rest of the state is empty. One of the things I enjoyed about shooting in Japan was the number of people around me. Overall, I’m more of an outside photographer rather than studio or in-home shooting. Some people seem to get away with 2,000 photos taken in their living room. I need to get out and see things. I actually really enjoy being out in the middle of nowhere with nobody around, as well.

6) Q: Tell us about a project you’re working on.

A: I don’t specifically have projects, though I did just put together a book of 35mm photographs from Japan. I mostly have themes that I shoot, which mostly involves desert decay. But I have more of an Eggleston state of mind…I wander around and shoot what catches my eye, rather than specifically seeking out what I see as an idea in my head. Though if I have a model, I will have specific photos I know I want to take.

7) Q: Who are your favorite photographers, instant or otherwise?

A: William Eggleston, Robert Adams and Stephen Shore, to name a few. I like photography books, so I have a wide range of photographic tastes. I like a lot of Japanese photographers, as well. Oddly enough, I can’t really think of any specific instant photographers. It seems like more of a secondary option for many photographers, like Ansel Adams. There is lots of stuff that I like, but it’s more photo specific rather than photographer specific. I like a lot of the work some of my friends do, like Skorj, and a lot of what I see on Flickr. But I’m also pretty picky and get bored with a lot of it…I like my own work!

8) Q: If you could take a photo of anyone or anything what would it be?

A: I would love to drag my Polaroid 190 to the top of Everest and take some photos. I’m fairly willing to be burdened down by cameras, and it would be great to take some instant shots in really difficult places that probably haven’t been shot with Polaroid. I was just at Ship Rock in New Mexico, and wondered if I had the first ever Greyhound and the first 190 with ID-UV on top of the “tail” that extends from the main plug.

About Sean:

“I’ve lived in Phoenix, AZ, since 1997 and spent most of my life before that in northwest Indiana. I am currently an RN on a telemetry floor (which is nice because I only work three nights a week with plenty of time to shoot), and previously I spent 10 years doing magazine work. And I made pizza for a long time. I have a greyhound that goes with me on all of my road trips. She sleeps in the truck during the day, and at Motel 6 at night. She seems to enjoy it.”

Special thanks to Sean for taking part in 8 Exposures! To see more of his work, please visit his Flickr Photo Stream

No. 285

8 Exposures...with Jade Sheldon.

Patrick Tobin | 1664 days ago

Hello, Impossibles! Welcome back to 8 Exposures. This week, we spoke with Portland, OR-based photographer, illustrator and MAE student Jade Sheldon

1) Q: What kind of Polaroid camera(s) do you use?

A: I have a small collection of Polaroid cameras that my grandparents have given me over the years. They love estate sales and whenever they come across a camera, they can’t resist getting it for me (you won’t catch me complaining). Not all of them are in working order, but they are beautiful to look at nonetheless. The main cameras I use for my instant film photography are my Sun 660 and Fuji Instax 210. I’m looking to add a Polaroid 195 to my modest collection.

2) Q: Why do you like instant photography?

A: I earned my BFA in illustration in 2009. That was four long years of sketches, thumbnails, roughs, color comps, second-guessing, finals, and critiques. Creating an illustration can take hours… days… even months. There is so much planning and so much preparation that goes into it. When I discovered instant film, I felt so free. With instant film, I could create a piece of original art in seconds. I could uncover beauty in a scene that would otherwise be overlooked. I love the fact that you never know exactly what is going to appear on that piece of film. All of its quirks and imperfections make it that much more personal and lovely.

3) Q: What is your earliest memory of instant film?

A: In high school, I was looking through my mom’s piles of old photographs and came across a collection of polaroids of my family at various birthdays and holidays. My dad, sporting his long hair and sideburns and wearing his leather jacket and my mom, with her huge, permed hair and neon colored frocks. I remember thinking how beautiful it was that they had these happy little moments captured on film that they might have otherwise forgotten about. I knew I wanted to be able to capture moments of my life like that too.

4) Q: What’s your favorite Impossible Project film type?

A: I have recently fallen madly in love with PX 600 Silver Shade UV+. Completely, madly, deeply.

5) Q: What are your favorite subjects to photograph?

A: I don’t have a complicated answer to this question, I just simply love photographing my life: myself, my fiancé, people I meet, tree-lined trails I walk, an especially delicious breakfast I eat, an abandoned coffee cup I stumble across in a cafe. I look forward to the day when I’m a wrinkly old lady, muttering on about my youth to my grandchildren and showing them what life was like back in my day through my collection of photographs.

6) Q: Tell us about a project you’re working on.

A: One project that I’m really excited about is a portrait series I’m starting. I will be interviewing and photographing artists (photographers, illustrators, painters, musicians) living and working in the Pacific Northwest.

7) Q: Who are your favorite photographers, instant or otherwise?

A: Wow, this is an extremely loaded question because, honestly, there is so much talent out there that I admire, appreciate and look up to. A list of photographers whose blogs inspire me daily include Jamie Beck, Parker Fitzgerald, Sean Flanigan, Alica Gao, Nikole Herriott, Sarah Jane, Kim Miller, Sara Lynn Paige, Chris & Sarah Roads and Lisa Warninger.

8) Q: If you could take an photo of anyone or anything what would it be?

A: A few weeks ago I stumbled across Austin Gros’ photographs of the Austrian Alps and I have made it my mission to get there with my instant film camera(s) in tow.

Special thanks to Jade for taking part in 8 Exposures! To see more of her photography, please visit her Flickr Photo Stream and her Tumblr, Instant Haven

No. 279

8 Exposures...with Andrew Millar.

Patrick Tobin, | 1671 days ago

Hello again, 8 Exposures fanatics! We’re back with another splendid entry in our instant film interview series. This week, we spoke with Andrew Millar

1) Q: What kind of Polaroid camera(s) do you use?

A: I have quite a few SX-70 cameras; some work better than others but I mostly tend to use my trusty old brown SX-70 Land Camera 2.

2) Why do you like instant photography?

A: It can be unpredictable and love it when you try to control or play with the outcome and end up with something unexpected and unique.

3) Q: What is your earliest memory of instant film?

No one in my family owned an instant camera so my earliest memory would be going to get my passport photos done when I was a child in an old-fashioned photo booth.

4) What’s your favorite Impossible film type?

A: I enjoy experimenting with the new film types. I’m particularly fond of the PX 680 Colour Shade and the PX 600 Silver Shade Gold Frame and Black Frame.

5) Q: What are your favorite subjects to photograph?

A: Where I live the everyday crowds force me to find places where there are no cars, people or noise. Old seaside towns are very romantic and nostalgic, as if time has stood still.

6) Q: Tell us about a project you’re working on.

A: I’m currently working on a series of images for an expo that I have at En Face in Paris next February so I’m busy getting ready for that.

7) Q: Who are your favorite photographers, instant or otherwise?

A: When I was at Uni and saw destroyed photographs by Arnulf Rainer, the destructiveness of his images really related to how I felt at that time, luckily Bob Ross’s joy of painting taught me to relax. I’m also a big fan of Gilbert and George. I love their large photo pieces from the seventies. Also, work by Diane Arbus and the talented Raul Diaz.

8) Q: If you could take an photo of anyone or anything what would it be?

A: Keith Richards.

Thanks very much to Andrew for taking part in 8 Exposures this week!

No. 274

8 Exposures...with Kristen Perman.

Patrick Tobin | 1678 days ago

Hello, friends! We hereby present you with another entry in our instant film Q & A series, 8 Exposures. This week, we profiled California photographer Kristen Perman

1) Q: What kind of Polaroid camera(s) do you use?

A: My favorite camera is my SLR 680. I actually have two of them, both in a delicate state from being dropped. I also love my Spectra camera, gifted to me by a good friend, who found it by her apartment dumpster in Philly. It’s clear, so you can see all the inner workings and it has proven to be a great conversation starter.

2) Q: Why do you like instant photography?

A: Instant photography taught me how to frame a photo and of course, to slow down. I’ve learned that the first shot is always the best, even if that first shot is not the best or your favorite.

3) Q: What is your earliest memory of instant film?

A: We always had a Polaroid camera around. There are random family photos throughout my childhood proving its existence even though I don’t remember it much.

4) Q: What’s your favorite Impossible film type?

A: I love PX 680 Color Shade right now, especially the Gold Frame Edition.

5) Q: What are your favorite subjects to photograph?

A: I love to shoot at the beach and I love to shoot on the street. I’m inspired by architectural details and by the colors here in Los Angeles. I’m a sucker for shop windows and who doesn’t love a good still life soaked in light?

6) Q: Tell us about a project you’re working on.

A: I just finished shooting all twenty-one of the California missions with my Spectra and it’s a beautiful project. I really want to push through feeling shy and finish my 100 strangers project. I find that shooting a polaroid portrait is easier because my camera gives me a way to break the ice.

7) Q: Who are your favorite photographers, instant or otherwise?

A: Right now, I’m completely enamored with the work of Wallace Berman after finding a book on his work in a museum bookstore. And always my self portrait heroes, Francesca Woodman and Cindy Sherman.

8) Q: If you could take an photo of anyone or anything what would it be?

A: I would love to take two polaroid portraits: Cindy Sherman and Kristen Wiig.

Thank you for taking part in 8 Exposures, Kristen! To see more of Kristen’s work, please visit her Flickr Photo Stream.

No. 265

8 Exposures...with Jessica Hibbard Elenstar.

Patrick Tobin | 1685 days ago

Hello again from 8 Exposures! This week, we’re highlighting Maryland Event Planner and photo genius Jessica Hibbard Elenstar!

1) Q: What kind of Polaroid camera(s) do you use?

A: My collection is always expanding, but my favorites are SX-70s, Spectra ProCams, and Super Shooters. I always have at least two of each in case one breaks, and multiple cameras also come in handy for shooting different film types at the same time.

2) Q: Why do you like instant photography?

A: I’m drawn to the beauty of vintage cameras, the warmth of film, and the uniquely imperfect nature of each image. Even “bad” polaroids are good, and a nice reminder for a control freak like myself to be open to surprises.

3) Q: What is your earliest memory of instant film?

A: My grandmother’s Spectra camera. I still remember her opening the crinkly silver package of film. She insisted on taking a picture of the entire family at the dinner table when we were all together, so there are many vintage shots of me as a kid with food in my mouth.

4) Q: What’s your favorite Impossible film type?

A: I went on a PZ 680 shooting binge this summer. I absolutely love the colors, and in my opinion, it’s the easiest Impossible film to use. I’ve recently been shooting the new PX 100 test film, and I’m head over heels …I’ve always been more of a color film enthusiast, but the spectacular tones and contrast are making me reconsider black & white photography.

5) Q: What are your favorite subjects to photograph?

Daily life — Mostly my cats, weekend breakfasts, plants in our garden, and little scenes I discover while walking around town. I also find any change of scenery to be hugely inspiring. Some of my favorite photos were taken in the rural mountains of Pennsylvania, the busy streets of New York City, and the scenic beaches of Oregon.

6) Q: Tell us about a project you’re working on.

A: It’s kind of lonely being one of just a few instant photographers in my small city. My background is in event planning, so I’d like to organize a fun weekend of instant photography with like-minded friends. Maybe a meetup here in Frederick, or an “analog girls” weekend in NYC.

7) Q: Who are your favorite photographers, instant or otherwise?

A: I love studying the work of female photographers of the past. I’ve followed the discovery of Vivian Maier’s photos with great interest. And I’m completely enchanted every time I pick up a book of Linda McCartney’s photographs.

I think today’s instant photography community is perhaps the most talented group of photographers ever. Jake Messenger, Heather Champ, Rommel Pecson, Jeff Hutton, and Amanda Mason are some of my favorite instant talents. I’ve learned almost everything I know about instant photography from Anne Bowerman and Dave Bias, who are the the world’s best photowalk companions.

8) Q: If you could take a photo of anyone or anything what would it be?

A: A couple months ago, I flew in a hot air balloon for the first time. The logistics of the flight were such that I couldn’t take instant photos … So I’m dying to fly again with a polaroid camera and Impossible film. I think I’ll get my chance this spring when I fly with Tailwinds Over Frederick, a local balloon company. Anyone want to join me?

Heaps of thanks to Jessica for taking part in 8 Exposures! To view more of her work, please visit her Flickr Photo Stream

No. 259

8 Exposures...with Ben Shuster.

Patrick Tobin | 1692 days ago

Hello again, instanteers, and welcome back to 8 Exposures! This week, we spoke with Washington, DC-based Ben Shuster…

1) Q: What kind of Polaroid camera(s) do you use?

A: I have a couple SX-70s – the Original and the Sonar Onestep – and a Spectra for the current and past integral packs. For packfilm I go with either the Model 340 Land Camera or my Kiev 88 fitted with the Polaroid magazine. I also still have a fair amount of Type 80 series packfilm, and those go straight into my Holgaroid.

2) Q: Why do you like instant photography?

A: Like so many other people, I love its vintage coolness, nostalgia-soaked colors and analog unpredictability. It sets your shots apart from everything else out there. It can take a perfectly normal snapshot and make it perfectly unique. The variety of manipulation and lift techniques really make creative possibilities endless. AND! Name someone you know who doesn’t have a “make my photos look like instant film” app on their phone – you can’t do it. WE know what’s up. WE have the prints to prove it.

3) Q: What is your earliest memory of instant film?

A: I have a Polaroid sitting in a stack of prints somewhere with “X-Mas 1989” written on it. I remember we would take pictures of the tree when I was a kid – I mean, when you think about your childhood, what’s more nostalgic than that?

4) Q: What’s your favorite Impossible film type?

A: Right now it’s the Black Frame PX 600. It’s simple, it’s classic, and I may be in the minority here but I can’t wait for some nice freezing, snowy white weather so I can get out there and “monochrom-atify” my life.

5) Q: What are your favorite subjects to photograph?

A: I never really go out with a plan because I don’t like to limit myself and I enjoy shooting spontaneously. Living near the colors and chaos of Venice Beach the last few years really spoiled me. I loved everything about it. There was never a shortage of odd characters and sherbet sunsets. When I look at my stuff now, I guess I was trying to photograph a general cross-section of the counter-culture…I threw in the “beachy” stuff for my own comic relief.

6) Q: Tell us about a project you’re working on

A: Well, I mentioned Venice Beach…I actually just moved to Washington, DC and have been trying to get a feel for city. I’ve traded my California mountains for monuments, and celebrities for politicians. Of course I want to photograph the city, but not so much the typical, historical DC. That may come later when I can try an unusual take on it. It’s a mobile city, and through the metro alone I’ve already discovered many great “pockets” that I’d like to continue to explore.

7) Q: Who are your favorite photographers, instant or otherwise?

A: Aside from Grandpa? I really enjoy Rock ‘N’ Roll fine art photography and am a huge classic rock junkie. Gered Mankowitz is one of my favorites – the shining jewel of my apartment walls is a Rolling Stones print from his “Between the Buttons” shoot with the band. Henry Diltz is another favorite because his photos manage to create such a strong connection to a era in music that happened 20 years before I was even born. His images are just so iconic, my favorites being the “Morrison Hotel” and “Crosby, Stills & Nash” album art. Art Kane is great because his music stuff is so different in a conceptual way. For a quick instant film nod, check out Bobby Klein’s John Belushi/Blues Brothers Polaroid transfer!

8) Q: If you could take an photo of anyone or anything what would it be?

A: Without a doubt, it would be the remaining members of The Doors – Densmore, Krieger, and Manzarek. If we’re allowed to include time travel and/or members of the “27 Club” in this fantasy scenario, let’s get Morrison there too! John, Robby, Ray: have your people call my— me.

Thanks so much to Ben for taking part in 8 Exposures!

No. 254

8 Exposures...with Jake Messenger.

Patrick Tobin | 1699 days ago

We’re happy to bring you another entry in our popular instant film question-and-answer series 8 Exposures! This week, we proudly feature UK-based photographer and digital artist Jake Messenger

1) Q: What kind of Polaroid camera(s) do you use?

A: Many! My favourites are my dad’s old original SX-70, and the SX-70 Sonar which belonged to his business partner. I also use a hefty 600SE; the quality you can get from it is fantastic, but it is a beast to lug about. My lighter pack-film option is a Land Automatic 250. I have a few other cameras knocking about – a Super Shooter, a 600 P, an SX-70 3000. On my shelf there are a couple of beauties for show: I love the 800 roll-film camera. Oh, and I have a pack-film back for my Holga!

2) Q: Why do you like instant photography?

A: I love the ‘thingness’ of instant: how you compose your picture, take it, and within a few minutes you have the physical object in your hand. While I love all kinds of image-making, the immediacy of instant is just magical. I love the fact that the film is its own darkroom, that once the image is there, that’s it – there are no processing decisions to be made.

I also love how it slows me down and makes me think more about which pictures I want to take. If I walk about with my digital SLR I may easily take hundreds of pictures, whereas with my instant shots I’m aware that each picture has more value (in terms of cost, and as an object), so I’m more deliberate. Where with digital I would take a picture for the sake of it, with instant I will more often than not move on and save that frame for later.

And finally, I love the community that has grown up online around the end of Polaroid film and the birth of The Impossible Project. Through Flickr and Twitter there are so many passionate, interesting, generous, talented people, all coming together to share images and ideas. The annual ‘Roid Week festival on Flickr is such a great way to see the work of so many instant film lovers.

3) Q: What is your earliest memory of instant film?

A: I remember my dad’s SX-70 back in the 70’s. He was a film director in advertising, and one of his clients gave it to him around 1974 or so, and he still has many of the pictures taken with it, including me aged three or four, above. We also had a Swinger or similar around the house, but I don’t remember it ever being used. I do remember playing with it, turning the knob and seeing “YES” appear in the viewfinder. In the early 80’s my dad gave me a grey “The Button” SX-70, and I have the results squirrelled away somewhere (although the camera is long gone).

I didn’t rediscover Polaroid until 2009 when I read online about the decline of the company, and these crazy people who were trying to revive instant photography. I looked longingly at the PolaPremium site, then remembered having seen my dad’s old SX-70 at their house. I bought some Artistic Time Zero film from the Photographers’ Gallery in London, and when I next visited I popped it in the camera, and took the picture of the glass vase. I was utterly hooked. My dad let me keep the camera, and here I am!

4) Q: What’s your favorite Impossible film type?

A: The thrill and magic of the original PX 100 was hard to beat, but I love the contrast and tone with the PX 600 UV+, and the Black Frames! Yum! And I was lucky enough to test out the Beta PX 680, which was crispy. It’s so exciting to experience the growth of these new films.

5) Q: What are your favorite subjects to photograph?

A: Forests, Provençe and corners in cities. I’m not a very deliberate photographer: I don’t tend to carry a tripod, and I don’t wait hours for the right light. I usually wander around, snapping what I find in front of me.

6) Q: Tell us about a project you’re working on.

A: No real firm projects at the moment. However, having recently moved to London (I had been commuting for nearly 7 years), I am enjoying exploring new areas and places and finding things to photograph. So corners, signs, trees…The usual.

7) Q: Who are your favorite photographers, instant or otherwise?

A: Oh, there are many! If you look though my favourites on flickr, you’ll see most of my Instant favourites. Particularly: Rommel, Jeff Hutton, Caballos Blancos, Gentleman Amateur, futurowoman, amamason, Grant Hamilton, Tubes, anniebee, jesshibb, lawatt…But I could go on forever.

Non-Flickr faves: Richard Misrach – Desert Cantos was very important to me early on; the sense of space and unreality in the weapons testing ranges is extraordinary. William Eggleston’s colour, Cartier Bresson’s use of the frame. And I have a book of photographs by Bruce Chatwin which are very much my kind of thing.

8) Q: If you could take an photo of anyone or anything what would it be?

A: I do need to stand in front of buildings in New York with my cameras, and Tokyo too. And I’d love to see the volcanos and glaciers of Iceland.

Endless thanks to Jake for taking part in 8 Exposures! To view more of his splendid instant magic, please visit his Flickr Photo Stream and his site, jakemessenger.com

No. 250

8 Exposures...with Britta Hershman.

Patrick Tobin | 1706 days ago

Hello again, friends, and welcome back to 8 Exposures! This week we spoke to Britta Hershman

1) Q: What kind of polaroid camera(s) do you use?

A: For most of my instant photography, I use my trusty green OneStep Express, aka, the Turtle. Actually, I’m mildly obsessed with all things Italian, so I call it by its Italian name, la Tartaruga. It’s cute, green, and round, and I found it in a thrift shop in Naples, Italy. It was my first instant camera, so it will always hold a special place in my heart. I also use a Spectra, a Polaroid 330 for Type 100 peel-apart film, and a Polaroid Land Camera 800 for Type 40 series roll film, nicknamed the Dino because of its impressive size and weight. And also, sadly, because film for it is nearly extinct. It’s difficult to find, and the few films that are left have been expired for decades and are often dried out. So the chances of ending up with actual photos are slim, but once in a while it does happen. And every time it does, I’m reminded of why I love instant photography.

2) Q: Why do you like instant photography?

A: It’s a thrill to create tiny but complete works of art with a camera. Art that is instantly finished and ready to be shared, framed, or just admired. I love that there’s no post processing in pure instant photography: everything has to happen in-camera. The limited controls of instant cameras require me to be thoughtful, creative, and attentive, and I thrive on that challenge.

3) Q: What is your earliest memory of instant film?

A: I remember my grandparents in Germany using a Polaroid camera when I was little. I’ll never forget being spellbound by the photos being ejected from the camera and slowly appearing.

4) Q: What’s your favorite Impossible film type?

A: I’m crazy about monochrome photography, and I can’t get enough of the Silver Shade films — they speak to my photographer’s soul. I love their dreamy, timeless look, especially for capturing trees, landscapes, and historic subjects. My favorite is the PX 600 Silver Shade Black Frame edition: beautiful monochrome shades, a bold frame, and the option of turning the images into versatile transparencies. What more could you want? It’s perfect.

5) Q: What are your favorite subjects to photograph?

A: Trees, landscapes, and historic places. I like timeless scenes where the viewer can’t easily tell in which decade or perhaps even in which century the photo was taken. When composing shots, I look for telltale signs of modern civilization and keep them out of my photos whenever possible. One of my favorite subjects is a magnolia tree near our house. Buildings and street lights are nearby, but my secret is kneeling or lying down and aiming the camera up towards it. That way, no man-made objects appear in the photo; the tree stands alone. It could be anywhere or nowhere, which appeals to me. My magnolia definitely holds the honor of being the most photographed tree in the neighborhood!

6) Q: Tell us about a project you’re working on.

A: I’m experimenting with combining Impossible photos with alternative and hybrid printing techniques. I’ll shoot a photo on Impossible film, scan it, and make a digital negative, which I use to create contact prints. It was exciting to learn to print cyanotypes, and now I’m also working with liquid emulsions on glass. Finding new ways to give life to my beloved instant photos in this way has been both challenging and rewarding.

7) Q: Who are your favorite photographers, instant or otherwise?

A: I’m a fan of Richard Avedon’s photography. His dynamic portraits and dramatic monochrome style speak to me. I’m a bit awkward when photographing people, which is another reason I admire his work so much. My favorite instant photographer is my partner-in-crime Genevieve Neal. Not only has she been a source of inspiration, creativity, and encouragement for me personally, but her own instant photography speaks volumes. She makes magic happen with her SX-70, her Spectra, and her Super Shooter.

8) Q: If you could take a photo of anyone or anything what would it be?

A: Drop me in an open field with a single, solitary tree, and I’ll be perfectly happy. I would want to capture it all: different skies, clouds, angles, seasons, and moods, all personified by a single tree. Does a tree have moods, you ask? Of course it does. Just ask my magnolia.

Thanks very much to Britta for taking part in 8 Exposures! To see more of her photographic creations, visit her Flickr Photostream and her Blog

No. 243

8 Exposures...with Dan Meade.

Patrick Tobin | 1713 days ago

Hello, Impossibles! We’re back with another warm and fuzzy entry in our 8 Exposures series. This week, we highlighted NY-based Graphic and Web Designer Dan Meade

1) Q: What kind of Polaroid camera(s) do you use?

A: All of them! No, really…I have this thing where I have to try everything. I probably have at least one of every style and format of Polaroid camera, from Spectra and peel-apart cameras to 500 and even I-Zone!

I really enjoy my SLR cameras (several SX-70s and an SLR680) most, but I’ve also built a few home-made cameras including instant pinhole cameras and a custom rubber-coated “Holga-roid.” I also just got a Crown Graphic, which is just fascinating when used with instant film.

2) Q: Why do you like instant photography?

A: I was initially drawn to instant photography for the nostalgia.

However, I quickly became hooked on the “instant gratification” and the unpredictable nature of instant photos. I love how this process uses chemicals – they can decay and expire or be manipulated to create something that has elements of both intentional and unexpected at the same time. The images are so unique, that it would be Impossible to do this with digital. see what I just did there? Impossible? ;)

3) Q: What is your earliest memory of instant film?

A: I remember mostly the boxy plastic Polaroid cameras of the 80s and 90s. I think more than the cameras, I remember the little white-bordered 600 and Time Zero photos that used to be taken and shared at events like birthday parties, and that magic of watching the photo appear so quickly.

4) Q: What’s your favorite Impossible film type?

A: Here comes my “need to try them all” thing again. I like them all for different reasons.

The color films have really evolved and I am excited to try each release, but the PX680 Beta was a favorite of mine for the saturated colors and raw, “unfiltered” look.

As far as the Silver Shade films go, I found PX100 First Flush was really superb for the exact reasons that some may have found it challenging to work with. There was amazing potential in the ability to purposely exploit the temperature sensitivity to create wildly varying tones and other effects. I am hoarding a few packs still, thank goodness! But I also can’t argue with progress, and the PX 600 UV+ really is just gorgeous with tones that are less sepia and more silvery. Is that a word ? Silvery?

5) Q: What are your favorite subjects to photograph?

A: I like to try and find the hidden beauty in everyday objects or scenes that we pass by without ever stopping to notice. Even things that are not traditionally considered beautiful can become interesting if you look at them the right way. So I tend to take a lot of photos of decay in both urban and rural settings. But I would really like to spend some time improving my skills with portraits and people.

6) Q: Tell us about a project you’re working on.

A: I have been working on a series of abstract instant textures. The process involves injecting chemicals, applying extreme temperatures, and using other types of manipulation to alter the chemistry and development to make unique, one-of-a-kind abstract compositions of color and texture. The results from each experiment tend to be “Impossible” to duplicate so each one is special. See how I did that again?

7) Who are your favorite photographers, instant or otherwise!

A: There are so many talented people on sites like Flickr and Polanoid who inspire me to keep trying new things and see things in new ways. Anyone whose work I have seen has influenced me in some way, so there are really too many people to list.

8) Q: If you could take a photo of anyone or anything what would it be?

A: Well, I just recently became a Dad, so I suspect I’ll be getting plenty of chances to get some practice with portraits!

If I could just get her to sit still long enough, I’d really love to have lots of those nostalgic instant photos of my daughter.

Thanks very much to Dan for taking part in 8 Exposures! Be sure to check out his Flickr Photo Stream for more instant magic!

No. 234

8 Exposures...with Brooke Castro.

Patrick Tobin | 1718 days ago

Hi again, 8 Exposures fanatics! We’re happy to bring you a special Sunday entry in our series. This episode, the star of 8 Exposures is Seattle-based designer, project manager and mom Brooke Castro…

1) Q: What kind of Polaroid camera(s) do you use?

A: I have 12 Polaroid cameras (there is no such thing as too many cameras, right?), but the ones I use most are my SLR 680 SE, SX-70, and a Polaroid ColorPack II.

2) Q: Why do you like instant photography?

A: I love that it has proved time and time again that the most beautiful or interesting photos aren’t always the ones you planned for or expected.

3) Q: What is your earliest memory of instant film?

A: When I was really young, my grandfather used to take family photos with a Polaroid camera. I can remember waiting, anxious for him to peel back the film and show my cousins and me the photo. (That Polaroid ColorPack II that I mentioned above? That was my grandpa’s camera.)

4) Q: What’s your favorite Impossible film type?

A: I’m excited about PX 680, but I really really REALLY love PX 600 UV+.

5) Q: What are your favorite subjects to photograph?

A: Looking at my recent instant photos it looks like fruits and vegetables, but without a doubt, my son Calder is my favorite subject to photograph. I’ve taken a photo of him (almost) every day since he was born. Not every photo is great, but it’s crazy to look back and see how much he’s changed. The instant film photos are definitely my favorites. (If I could get him to stand still, the ones that I scan and post would outnumber the stack of blurry instant photos I have of him.)

6) Q: Tell us about a project you’re working on.

A: I hope to get a book of my photos that I have designed in my head, out and on to paper in the new year. I’d also really like to curate and design an exhibit of instant photography by Northwest photographers.

7) Q: Who are your favorite photographers, instant or otherwise?

A: Hmmmm…I have quite a few favorites, but right off the top of my head:
Walker EvansI saw a show of his Polaroids at the Met years and years ago. It changed the way I look at the world.
Alison Garnett – I bought my first SX-70 after looking at her Polaroids on Flickr. In my opinion, there’s no one better at Pola-diptychs AND she takes the most amazing photos of her children.
Mr. Grant Hamilton – A master at capturing color and form. Every composition is perfect.
I also feel very lucky to be connected to the instant photography community via Flickr. There are so many talented photographers that I’ve had the pleasure of getting to know through their photos and kind comments – Jessica Hibbard, Anne Bowerman, Azuree Wiitala, Jenna Gersbach, Jeff Hutton, Patrick Tobin, Jenny Vorwaller, Jake Messenger, Nick Leonard – to name only a few. It’s really nice to know there are a bunch of people out there that are as passionate and excited about instant photography as you are.

8) Q: If you could take an photo of anyone or anything what would it be?

A: Strangers. I’ve passed by so many interesting looking people, but I never have the courage to stop them and ask if I can take a photo.

Thank you to Brooke for taking part in 8 Exposures! Be sure to check out more of her amazing photography in her Flickr Photo Stream

No. 232

8 Exposures...with Bradley Johnson.

Patrick Tobin | 1720 days ago

Hello, Impossibles! Welcome back to 8 Exposures. This week, we turned the spotlight on Long Beach, CA-based photographer Bradley Johnson:

1) Q: What kind of polaroid camera(s) do you use?

A: I use them all!…or at least, as many as I can get my hands on! Each camera has its own charm, but there are a few that I prefer more than others. I think that the SX-70 is the quintessential Polaroid camera. It does everything you would want a camera to do, and it uses instant film! My runner up would be the Propack. I know that many of my photographer friends will make fun of me for this, but it produces nice photos, and is relatively compact. I use the close-up, and portrait lens attachments (meant for the Polaroid 250, 360, 450 land cameras) to make it even more versatile. Also, it never has the jamming problem associated with Fuji pack film.

2) Q: Why do you like instant photography?

A: First and foremost is the instant feedback. However, with the advent of digital, that isn’t such a novelty anymore. I suppose the real reason I love instant film so much is the fact that each photo is an original work of art. There is no negative. The print you hold in your hand is one of a kind. There will never be another. Sure, you could scan and print a copy, but it will never be the same.

3) Q: What is your earliest memory of instant film?

A: I remember the camera my grandparents used for family snapshots. It was a Sun 660. I still have some of the shots taken with that camera, and they still look great! I have the camera as well. I don’t use it in my work, but it has great sentimental value to me.

4) Q: What’s your favorite Impossible film type?

A: The black and white (integral) film was something that I had never experienced, and thus very intriguing. However, I’m all about color. The PX 70 film allows me to continue using my SX-70, and produces colors that are extremely satisfying. Even if The Impossible Project succeeded in creating a film resembling 600 film, I would be very disheartened if this “time zero-esque” film were no longer available.

5) Q: What are your favorite subjects to photograph?

A: I can find beauty in pretty much anything, but my absolute favorite is the human face. There are so many possibilities, and I love to share the experience of instant film with people. It is such a rare experience these days, and I have yet to meet a person who wasn’t excited about it.

6) Q: Tell us about a project you’re working on.

A: Just one project?! I try to have at least 1 “major” shoot per month. My next one will be a “Dia De Los Muertos” theme. I try to come up with original ideas, or at least a new twist on an old idea. It helps me to keep my sanity.

7) Q: Who are your favorite photographers, instant or otherwise?

A: Gregory Crewdson, Emilie79 (Flickr), & Ansel Adams. There are so many more, but I felt like I should limit it to 3. I am consistently inspired by many of my “contacts” on Flickr photo sharing, and on Polanoid.

8) Q: If you could take a photo of anyone or anything what would it be?

A: Since I am most interested in people, it would most certainly be a portrait. There are many people I would like to photograph, but the person I enjoy photographing the most is my wife. I suppose you could say that I am extremely fortunate in that respect.

Thanks very much to Bradley for taking part in 8 Exposures! To see more of his photography visit his Flickr photo stream

No. 226

8 Exposures...with Jesse Freidin

Patrick Tobin, | 1727 days ago

Hello, 8 Exposures fans! This week, the star of 8 Exposures is Bay Area Dog Portrait Aficionado Jesse Freidin

1) Q: What kind of polaroid camera(s) do you use?