September 2010

8
No. 1

Impossible's Night Out

Frank Love, | 2064 days ago

As a part of the worldwide Fashion’s Night Out gala event, Impossible set up a booth at Unis – the retail shop of acclaimed menswear designer, Eunice Lee. Between the free booze and free instant photos, the place was totally mobbed all night and we blew through almost 20 packs of our PX 100 Silver Shade film.

The magic of this photo booth is that the best images will have new life this fall when Unis uses them to create their holiday wrapping paper! And, of course, the originals will be entering the Impossible Archive.

Click any of the photos on the right to open a slideshow to view our favorites of the bunch…

13
No. 2

Using PX 70 Color Shade in your 600 Camera

Frank Love, | 2058 days ago

Frank explains the ways to get great results with our PX 70 Color Shade film in various Polaroid 600 cameras.

14
No. 3

Impossible @ Real Art Ways

Frank Love, | 2058 days ago

Thursday, Sept. 16, 2010 - 6-10pm
Real Art Ways
56 Arbor St.
Hartford
CT

As part of the Creative Cocktail Hour series, Real Art Ways is hosting photographer Jane Shauck this Thursday as she creates an instant live art project using our latest PX Sliver Shade Instant film (grab the flyer). Jane will photograph attendees at the event and hang the prints in the gallery forming a giant Quick Response Code.

The photographs will be used to create an instant live art assemblage that will be completed during the event. The foundation of the live art piece will be the Real Art Ways Quick Response Code, which functions as a gateway between the real world and the digital world. By pointing their camera phones/smartphones at this code, guests will instantly be connected to the Real Art Ways’ website. The code itself will be transformed into a true contemporary art piece, incorporating portraits of the enthusiasts of this leading contemporary arts center.

In addition, Jane will utilize our PX Color Shade for her “30 Days of Doing the Impossible” personal project. This ongoing project will be updated regularly on both her blog and Facebook page .

Impossible is proud to support the Real Art Ways event and Jane’s “30 Days…” project. Check back soon for updates!

23
No. 4

New Films Announced @ PHOTOKINA!

Frank Love, | 2049 days ago

To introduce its new black-and-white and color films, Impossible invited friends and the press to a soirée at Photokina. There, Jan Hnizdo presented a rare shooting on the fabled 20×24” camera.

Read more via British Journal of Photography

No. 5

SX-70 Skins!!

Frank Love, | 2049 days ago

New SX-70 Skins to re-skin yours!

The NYC IMPOSSIBLE Space now has SX-70 Skins available for sale for anyone looking to give their SX-70 a brand new look, or some fresh personality. These were made by Aki-Asahi in Japan. Their website has been down for a while, however, so we might be the only place to currently buy these. They’re die-cut and ready to apply. Stay tuned to this site for an upcoming tutorial on cleaning off the old covering…

Each Skin is $20

To order call (212) 219-3254 or Email us

25
No. 6

Sticky Film Packs

Josie Keefe, | 2047 days ago

Frank is back with another installment of impossible solutions, showing us how to deal with sticky packs of film that won’t eject pictures. Watch the video for easy to follow instructions to save time and film!

27
No. 7

IMPOSSIBLE Shopping Bags!

Frank Love, | 2045 days ago

Come into the IMPOSSIBLE NYC Space and get one of our new reusable shopping bags which will be FREE with purchase for a limited time only!

30
No. 8

Open House New York Contest

Josie Keefe, | 2042 days ago

We’re celebrating the hidden beauty of New York City through instant film. In conjunction with Open House New York, we’re holding a mini-exhibition and contest in our NYC space.

Take an instant photo at any Open House location, and bring it in to the NYC space to enter the contest. The images will be displayed in our gallery for the month of October. On October 22 Florian Kaps, our founder, will choose the winner.

The Lucky winner will receive a prize package that includes a rare vintage Polaroid 635 Supercolor camera, and 2 packs of our new PX600 film.

The fine print:

Please include the following on the back of your photo:
1. your name
2. your email address
3. the OHNY location where the photo was taken.

Limit 4 submissions per person.

No. 1176

Tutorial Thursday: Collages with the Instant Lab

Lucile Le Doze, | 564 days ago

Mermaid by Alan Marcheselli

Welcome back to Tutorial Thursday! On Thursday, twice a month, we will focus on one particular creative technique that can be easily reproduced, whether it’s camera-based, to do with film manipulation or even using the Instant Lab.

For this edition of Tutorial Thursday, we want to show you how to realize collages with the Instant Lab. It is the perfect tool to see beyond one image and to create large photomontages and collages.

What you need

1 Impossible Instant Lab
1 Impossible Film
1 iPhone 4, 4S, 5, 5S or iPod 4th or 5th Generation
1 high-resolution digital picture or several digital images

How to do it

Step 1. Launch the Impossible Project App on your iPhone.
Step 2. Select one high-resolution digital image.
Step 3. Zoom into a part of it and crop it.
Step 4. Follow the instructions on the screen to edit your image. You are now ready to expose your picture.
Step 5. Place your iPhone on the cradle with the screen facing down.
Step 6 Once in the cradle, the iPhone flash will turn on. Within 3 seconds, pull the shutter slide all the way out.
Step 7. Eject your first picture.
Step 8. Repeat from part 2 to expose all the different pieces of your original digital image.
Step 9. Once developed, simply arrange all the parts together to re-create the image or to create a new collage.

Note: you can crop your image with a photo-editing software on your computer and expose all the several parts. You can also expose many different images to compose a collage.

Voila! You have successfully completed the fantastic technique of collages with the Instant Lab! Have fun, be creative and don’t forget to share your results on the Impossible Gallery or on Social Media!

Which technique would you like to see next on Tutorial Thursday? Ask us anything on Facebook, Twitter or comment here!

No. 1167

Tutorial Thursday: Emulsion Lifts

Lucile Le Doze, | 579 days ago

What you need: 1 instant photo, 1 or many soft brushes, 1 pair of scissors, 1 carrier surface (paper, wood, plastic, glass…) and 1 bowl filled with hot water.

Welcome back to Tutorial Thursday! On Thursday, twice a month, we will focus on one particular creative technique that can be easily reproduced, whether it’s camera-based, to do with film manipulation or even using the Instant Lab.

For this edition of Tutorial Thursday, we want to show you how to realize emulsion lifts, a classic technique in which film is peeled apart and the clear front panel is dipped in warm water to free the emulsion layer from the plastic. These free-floating emulsions can then be placed on various papers or other materials.

What you need

1 instant photo
1 or many soft brushes
1 pair of scissors
1 carrier surface (paper, wood, plastic, glass…)
1 bowl filled with hot water

How to do it

Step 1. Using scissors, cut the frame off your image. You will need to cut the very edges of your picture to remove the whole frame.
Step 2. Only keep the square photo.
Step 3. 
Plunge the image into the bowl of hot water and let it soak for 
aprox. 1 minute.
Step 4. Start in one corner of the image and peel the positive from the negative part. The two parts should peel easily. If they don’t, plunge the image into the water for 30 seconds and try again.
Step 5. Remove the white negative part and keep the transparent positive part.
Step 6. To clean the remaining chemistry on the positive part, softly clean it in the water using a brush.
Step 7. Plunge the image into the water again for 1 or 2 minutes. Using a soft brush, remove the emulsion from the transparent foil.
Step 8. Remove the plastic sheet and keep the emulsion in water.
Step 9. The emulsion is now free from the plastic. You can touch it and hold the image in your hand !
Step 10. Notice that one side of the image is milky. Turn the image around so you don’t see this milky side.
Step 11. Using a brush, bring your photo back to life in water.
Step 12. Pick a carrier surface. It can be wood, plastic, glass, paper or even a mirror!
Step 13. Carefully slide the carrier surface under the emulsion.
Step 14. Using a brush or your fingers, position the emulsion on the carrier surface.
Step 15. Remove the image from water. You can still work on the emulsion as long as it is in the water, so you can hold one side of the image, plunge the other side in water and start again until you are satisfied with the result.
Step 16. If the carrier surface and the emulsion are still wet, you can work on the emulsion, create or remove wrinkles and new shapes with a brush or your fingers
Step 17. Let the emulsion lift dry for approximately 24 hours. The emulsion is now stuck on the surface!

Voila! You have successfully completed the fantastic technique of emulsion lifts! Have fun, be creative and don’t forget to share your results on the Impossible Gallery or on Social Media!

Which technique would you like to see next on Tutorial Thursday? Ask us anything on Facebook, Twitter or comment here!

No. 1131

Tutorial Thursday: Light painting with an SX-70

Lucile Le Doze | 634 days ago

Light Painting is a technique that gives amazing results. Photo by Frédéric Viñolas

Welcome back to Tutorial Thursday! On Thursday, twice a month, we will focus on one particular creative technique that can be easily reproduced, whether it’s camera-based, to do with film manipulation or even using the Instant Lab.

For this edition of Tutorial Thursday, and as today is SX-70 day, we want to show you how to realize light painting with an SX-70. Light painting is a photographic technique in which exposures are made by moving a hand-held light source. With this technique, you will get ghostly results!

The SX-70 is a remarkable piece of engineering. It measures the light with its photocell and calculates a shutter speed for any lighting situation. The longest time that the shutter opens in complete darkness is 14 seconds. For this to happen, you can either block the light meter with your finger, or simply tape something opaque over it, and this will result in maximum exposure. This tutorial is meant for this exposure time (14 seconds), as this is normal for all SX-70 cameras. (Other tricks can allow you to increase the long exposure, discover them at the end of the tutorial)

What you need

1 SX-70 camera and Impossible films for SX-70
1 tripod or anything to keep your camera stable
1 torch or your phone flash

Optional
Filters to place on the torch
1 cable release to start the exposure from a distance

How to do it

Prepare your camera
Step 1. Put your SX-70 on a tripod and make sure that it is stable
Step 2. If you have one, plug in your cable release
Step 3. Cover the light meter with a sticker (if you aren’t planning to stay close to the camera) or your finger (if you plan to stand behind the camera)

Prepare for shooting
Step 5. Position your camera and focus on your subject
Step 6. Turn the lights off. The room where you are shooting should be completely dark for best results

Shoot and paint
Step 7. Press the button on your camera or on the cable release. The shutter will open and will stay open for 14 seconds
Step 8. Turn the flash of your phone of your torch on
Step 9. Start painting with light! You can either expose your subject with the light facing the subject, or face the camera with the light to create light lines and possibly write something. You can also use filters to change the colors
Step 10. You can also create images with different expositions, for example of a person with many arms or expose the same person twice. To realize this, expose your subject once to the light with your torch facing the subject. Turn the torch off, ask your subject to move in the dark and expose the subject again in an other position
Step 11. Once the 14 seconds have passed, the shutter will close and the camera will eject the photo
Step 12. Voila! You have successfully completed the fantastic technique of light painting with an SX-70. Have fun, be creative and don’t forget to share your results on the Impossible Gallery!

—-
Advanced tip: how to increase the long exposure time

To increase the exposure time on your SX-70, you can try opening the camera door mid-exposure. This effectively turns your camera off with the shutter open exposing your film. The advantage to this trick is you can take extended exposures in very dark settings. You can then enjoy light painting for as long as you want!

Warning: All SX-70 cameras models have different settings when it comes to long exposures, and that’s important for this trick. In order to see if your SX-70 allows the opening of the camera door mid-exposure, try it with an empty film pack. Be warned that this technique is not guaranteed to be consistent and you shouldn’t do it if you’re not comfortable with it, but it can produce amazing images.

How to test your camera using an empty film pack
Step 1. In the dark or with your finger on the light meter
Step 2. Press the shutter and open the camera door after a few seconds
Step 3. Keep your finger on the light meter and close the camera door
Possibility 1: If the motor makes the ejection noise, it means that your camera will eject the picture as soon as the door is closed
Possibility 2: If nothing happens, try to press the shutter once again. If the motor makes the ejection noise, then it means that you will have to press the button to eject the picture after closing the camera door
Possibility 3: If nothing happens, wait 14 seconds to see if the camera ends the long exposure cycle. If the motor makes the ejection noise, then it means that you will have to wait 14 seconds to get the picture after closing the camera door
Possibility 4: If nothing happens and if you have waited more than 14 seconds and tried to press the shutter, your camera didn’t finish the cycle. Take the film cartridge out and put it back in again to end the cycle. If you experienced this, you shouldn’t use this trick for long exposures and stick to the technique as explained above.

Which technique would you like to see next on Tutorial Thursday? Ask us anything on Facebook, Twitter or comment here!

No. 1119

Tutorial Thursday: Double Exposures with an Image/Spectra Camera

Lucile Le Doze, | 648 days ago

Double Exposure with an Image/Spectra!

Welcome to Tutorial Thursday! On Thursday, twice a month, we will focus on one particular creative technique that can be easily reproduced, whether it’s camera-based, to do with film manipulation or even using the Instant Lab.

For this issue of Tutorial Thursday, we want to show you how to realize double exposures with an Image/Spectra Camera and Impossible film. Super easy – we swear!

What you need
1 Image/Spectra Polaroid Camera
1 Impossible B&W or Color Film for Image/Spectra Cameras

How to do it

Step 1: Take your Polaroid Image/Spectra camera and a pack of Impossible B&W or Color Film for Image/Spectra Cameras. Set the lighten/darken adjuster on the back of your camera to darken.

Step 2: Choose your subject, press the shutter button and do not release your finger from it.

Step 3: Keep on holding the shutter button and open the film compartment door. You can now release your finger from the shutter button.

Step 4: Close the film compartment door.

Step 5: Take a second photo to compose the double exposure. Let the image eject from the camera.

Step 6: Let your image develop and enjoy your double exposure!

Note: you can also make triple or quadruple exposures but the overall picture might be overexposed.

We are looking forward to see your double exposures on the Impossible gallery!

Which technique would you like to see next on Tutorial Thursday? Ask us anything on Facebook, Twitter or comment here!

No. 775

Dr. Love's Tips - Shooting in Warm Weather

Patrick Tobin, | 1117 days ago

Welcome back to Dr. Love’s Tips, where Impossible USA’s camera resource manager Frank Love provides you with insight that allows you to get the best out of your Polaroid camera and Impossible film. This week: Shooting in Warm Weather…

It’s warming up again and even though we’ve touched on this topic before, it’s worth revisiting, for as the seasons have changed, so have our films.

Now everyone is surely familiar with our previous generation of COOL Films, but it’s possible that some haven’t yet shot our Color Protection films on those hot balmy summer days.

Just to start, whether it’s the COOL film or Color Protection film, the film is meant to be stored cool for best results. But, once you’re taking it out to shoot, you don’t need to keep the film at a refrigerated temperature. That said, if you’re going out on hot days, and plan to be outside for awhile, you will likely want to take some precaution so that the heat won’t affect the film.

There is one key difference to note between what you may be used to shooting (COOL color films and prior film generations), and the new Color Protection formula films. That being, COOL films when actually processing, would benefit from some extra warmth, giving the film a little boost in contrast and saturation. However, the new Color Protection formula does NOT react in the same way. The CPF films process best in those room temp/just below room temp conditions. Keep this in mind when venturing outside on hot days and heed the methods listed below for how to achieve these conditions for optimal results.

For anyone looking to get experimental though, the Color Protection films tend to have a reddish and reddish/yellow hue added to them in the hotter temps (see sample photos). Also, while the CP films may be much more resilient to light, keep in mind midsummer days have a LOT more light than other times, and traditional shielding would be recommended in the first minutes after ejection, as well as generally keeping the film out of the sun.

Now, as for general guidelines, the simplest thing is just minimizing exposure to the heat. There are some basic concepts like: don’t leave anything out of your bag in direct sun or on hot pavement. If you want to take it a step further, I find using a proper padded camera bag works really well. The padding in the bag works as a natural insulation, so when you’re leaving the safety of an air conditioned home or shop, the bag will take longer to heat up to the outside temperature. If you’re going to be out for a while, you can slow this process down more by not leaving the bag open and not having your camera out of the bag for an excessive amount of time.
If you’re still concerned about the heat and think it gets too hot too fast, another thing you can do is put a very small ice pack in your padded camera bag. You should be sure to wrap it in a towel so it doesn’t get your bag wet, but this will keep your bag a lot cooler for longer. I should point out you shouldn’t keep anything up against the ice pack, as while you do wanna keep the film from getting too hot, you don’t want to have too drastic of temperature differences between your bag and outside, which could cause the optics in your camera to fog up. If you carry the ice pack I actually do recommend you keep your bag open a little so it doesn’t turn your bag into an outright cooler.

You can apply the same concepts to your film as well, be it before, during, or after shooting. As it states on the film packaging, they should acclimate to room temp before you actually use them. This is because the film doesn’t want to be cold when you’re actually shooting because of how it will affect processing. Too much heat however can also affect the processing, so having a pocket in your bag that is out of direct sun, or kept a medium temp from the ice pack nearby, can be a good place to keep images during and especially after processing depending on how you want to affect the image with temperature.

In short, the best plan of action for shooting on hot days is simply minimize exposure to any temperature extremes. Padded camera bags are a simple and effective tool to help with this, and adding an ice pack properly can give you hours outside without worrying about how the heat may affect your film. Now get out there! Enjoy the beaches, parks, and pools and happy shooting.

Keep your rollers clean,

-f

No. 654

Dr. Love's Tips - 100 Speed Film in a 600 Camera

Patrick Tobin, | 1250 days ago

Greetings, friends, and welcome back to Dr. Love’s Tips, where Impossible USA’s Camera Resource Manager Frank Love provides you with advice and insight on how to get the best out of your Polaroid cameras and Impossible film. This entry: Push it! Push it Real Good…

Taking some cues from our Flickr thread, we’ve had some people write in asking about how to shoot SX-70 or 100 speed film in their 600 cameras. Whatever your reasons, be it you’re in a pinch and SX-70 is what’s available, or you want to bring one less camera with you, or you’re going for a different look than your SX-70 gets you, there is always something you can do to trick your camera to think how you want it to…or at least close to it.

For people who enjoy shooting 600 film in their SX-70, this is already a known and fairly easy practice for many. It’s a straightforward technique, 600 film is about 2 stops faster than what an SX-70 is calibrated to, so you take a 2-stop Neutral Density filter, and you put it somewhere in the path of where the light hits the film. People can simply get our pack filters and put that filter over the film itself, or there are also Lens ND filters, though these will also darken your viewfinder.

But…how does one do this in reverse? If you have a 600 camera and SX-70 film, now your film is about 2 stops slower than what the camera is calibrated to…how do you get more light in?

Well, there’s a fairly similar technique for this; you use an ND filter…you just put it somewhere else. You need to put the same kind of ND filter, not over the lens or the film, but rather over the meter on your camera. By putting the filter over the meter of the camera, it fools the camera into thinking there is that much less light than there actually is, and will compensate the exposure up that much more.

This technique leaves your light/darken slider or dial free to adjust to your needs. If you were to just try turning this switch all the way light to compensate and shoot SX-70 film, images will still tend to be dark, as this will only give you at most a stop and a half more light.

The big thing to note about this technique though is that most plastic 600 cameras have a maximum shutter speed of ½ a second, so if you are shooting with one, and your scene is too dark, your images will come out underexposed. Also, when using flash, the meter is often overridden because the level of light from the camera is ‘known’ to the camera, and again images will be too dark.

For typical shooting though, feel free to cut a small piece of ND and tape it over your meter on your camera and happy shooting!

As always, keep your rollers clean,

-f

If you have an issue or topic you’d like to see covered in Dr. Love’s Tips, leave a suggestion in our Flickr Discussion Thread.

No. 623

Dr. Love's Tips - Leaky Film

Patrick Tobin, | 1285 days ago

Welcome back to Dr. Love’s Tips, our ongoing series in which Impossible USA’s Camera Resource Manager Frank love addresses common film and camera questions. This week: The Secret of the Ooze.

We’ve had some people write in recently saying they had a frame of film here and there occasionally with blue liquid ooze coming out of the back top of the frame.

This ooze is in fact the developer chemistry. It is stored in 3 ‘pods’ at the base of the film. It is this that actually gave instant integral film that fat border on the bottom, purely from a functional standpoint.

The reason the chemistry occasionally oozes out the top, is very similar to why you’ll get the ‘undeveloped patch’. You see, the chemistry is spread from the pods through the frame as the film passes through the rollers of the camera. Now the amount and thickness of this spread is taken to an exact science, however, there are always some variables that can affect this. If shooting in cooler or warmer temperatures, or from one camera’s set of looser rollers to another’s tighter set, this can affect the spreading thickness. Also, if rollers are dirty, this creates uneven spots of spreading on the frame, which lead to white spots on your photos, but can also unevenly distribute the rest of the chemistry.

Depending on the circumstances, you can either be left with insufficient coverage, and the ‘undeveloped patch’, OR you can end up on the opposite extreme, with extra chemicals leaking out. At the top end of the frame is what we call “the trap,” which is a very small sponge. This is in place specifically to catch any excess chemistry, which can happen from time to time. Sometimes though, the amount left over is more than the trap can absorb, and it squeezes out of the back at the seam.

Now, the chemistry may seem fairly innocuous, but it is a caustic material, and should be washed off skin as soon as possible, and certainly avoid any contact with your face or eyes. Simply wiping the excess off onto something should suffice, as it will dry and harden into a white shell of sorts in a matter of minutes

If you do experience one of these oozy shots, also be sure to check your rollers and the door as it’s likely that some of it rubbed off and may affect your next shots. You can easily clean your camera’s rollers using the techniques shown in this video.

If this is an issue you experience often with multiple packs of film and in different conditions, you can look at the Swapping Doors blog post to try and swap the rollers on your camera, as they may be tight. This is likely only an issue with SX-70 cameras (box or folding) and not with any 600 or Spectra style.

I hope this helps with some of your questions, and as always,

Keep your rollers clean,

-f

No. 591

Dr. Love's Tips - Why 8 Photos?

Patrick Tobin, | 1313 days ago

Welcome back to Dr. Love’s Tips, our ongoing series in which Impossible USA’s Camera Resource Manager Frank Love provides you with valuable insight into the workings of instant film and cameras. This week: Why 8 Photos?

Many people have asked us…”Why only 8 frames instead of the traditional 10?”

The answer here is simple…yet complex. The simple answer is that there just isn’t room to put 10 frames of Impossible Film into a pack. Well then, how did Polaroid fit 10 frames into the same cartridge?

Here is where it gets a little more complex. Polaroid made nearly all their own materials, engineered collectively over 17 years; they were able to produce film that could eject out into direct sunlight moments after being exposed without harming the film, begin processing and stop all on its own…truly amazing. They had also done this with 10 frames of film to a cartridge.

In Impossible’s case, everything was there: cameras, cartridge size, and general functionality. The hard part here is that the old way of making the film was gone, no way back, everything for the film had to be re-engineered from scratch. So Impossible began a journey to create film that could function within these constraints, within this system of cartridges and cameras. There is very very little room for change in this system, but as the materials that go into the film HAD to change, it’s not surprising that the final product did vary a little from Polaroid’s.

The main difference is simply that Impossible film is thicker than Polaroid’s. This is found in the layers of material that are assembled together to allow the new film process to function. Inside a pack of film, because the thickest parts of the frames at the top (trap: the sponge for excess chemistry) and bottom (pod: the chemistry) ends, the film frames sit in a bowed curl as you go further down into the pack. This is true for both Polaroid and Impossible film. The difference though is that the middle of the pack, where it’s just the layers of the film, is thicker in Impossible film, so that when 9 or 10 frames are put into a pack (as they were in initial tests by our factory team), the pressure on the film creates issues with the film ejecting consistently. The result was photos getting badly jammed in the camera.

So in conclusion, the reason for 8 frames was not one for costs or anything like that, but rather the reality of the physics of the film.

I hope this helps answer some questions people have, and as always,

Keep your rollers clean,

-f

No. 449

Patrick Winfield's Photogram Workshop Returns!

Patrick Tobin, | 1429 days ago

Tuesday, June 12, 2012
7 - 8:30 pm
Impossible Project Space NYC
425 Broadway
5th Floor
New York NY 10013

Acclaimed artist and designer Patrick Winfield will return to the Impossible Project NYC Space to present his fascinating and distinctive photogram workshop. Well known for his vivid composites and alternative processes, Patrick will demonstrate his personal instant photogram technique with the Impossible film medium.

In this stimulating class, Patrick will outline a brief history of the photogram and the fundamentals of the process. Delving into the importance of film speed, exposures and the unique integral film process, you will leave this tutorial with stunning hand made instant images. Attendees will be supplied with one pack of Impossible color film, a Polaroid 600 camera, flashlights, transparencies and colored gels. You’re welcome to bring your own photogram objects also!

Workshop fee is $95 (price includes 1 pack PX 70 Color Shade 12/11)

To register, please call (212) 219 3254 or email nycspace@theimpossibleproject.com

No. 448

Dr. Love's Tips: Shooting In Hot Weather

Patrick Tobin, | 1429 days ago

Welcome back to Dr. Love’s Tips, our ever-popular series in which Impossible USA’s Camera Resource Manager provides advice to help you get the most out of your instant film experience. This week, Dr. Love focuses on shooting in hot weather…

Now that most everyone is enjoying warmer weather, and with the introduction of our COOL Films, a lot of people have been asking about best practices for shooting on those balmy summer days.

Just to start, COOL film is meant to be stored cool for best results, but once you’re taking it out to go shoot, you do NOT need to carry along a little lunch cooler to keep the film at a refrigerated temperature. That said, if you’re going out on especially hot days, and plan to be outside for a while, with COOL films or not, you will likely want to take some precaution so that the heat won’t affect the film.

The simplest thing is just minimizing exposure to the heat. There are some basic concepts like: don’t leave anything out of your bag in direct sun or on hot pavement. If you want to take it a step further, I find using a proper padded camera bag works really well. The padding in the bag works as a natural insulation, so when you’re leaving the safety of an air conditioned home or shop, the bag will take longer to heat up to the outside temperature. If you’re going to be out for a while, you can slow this process down more by not leaving the bag open and not having your camera out of the bag for an excessive amount of time.

If you’re still concerned about the heat and think it gets too hot too fast, another thing you can do is put a very small ice pack in your padded camera bag. You should be sure to wrap it in a towel so it doesn’t get your bag wet, but this will keep your bag a lot cooler for longer. I should point out you shouldn’t keep anything up against the ice pack, as while you do wanna keep the film from getting too hot, you don’t want to have too drastic of temperature differences between your bag and outside, which could cause the optics in your camera to fog up. If you carry the ice pack I actually do recommend you keep your bag open a little so it doesn’t turn your bag into an outright cooler.

You can apply the same concepts to your film as well, be it before, during, or after shooting. As it states on the COOL film packaging, they should acclimate to room temp before you actually use them. This is because the film doesn’t want to be cold when you’re actually shooting because of how it will affect processing. Too much heat however can also affect the processing, so having a pocket in your bag that is out of direct sun, or kept a medium temp from the ice pack nearby, can be a good place to keep images during and especially after processing depending on how you want to affect the image with temperature.

In short, the best plan of action for shooting on hot days is simply minimize exposure to any temperature extremes. Padded camera bags are a simple and effective tool to help with this, and adding an ice pack properly can give you hours outside without worrying about how the heat may affect your film. Now get out there! Enjoy the beaches, parks, and pools and happy shooting.

Keep your rollers clean,

-f

No. 436

Dr. Love's Tips: New PZ 680 COOL

Patrick Tobin, | 1440 days ago

After some testing here at Impossible, we’ve come to realize our latest version of the new PZ 680 COOL film has some unique properties that we thought we should address. Here’s Dr. Love…

Some of the conventional wisdom that has come to be associated with how to work with our films, may actually lead to making your images look worse instead of better. Some things we want to point out are…

1. The film is NOT fast, as we originally reported. It actually tests a little slow. It is however VERY sensitive in opacification failure, EVEN with the use of a Frog Tongue. Be very careful to shield completely!
2. If you have tried adjustments to counteract blown highlights and crushed blacks (little latitude and range), there are some things that you might be doing that actually compound the problem. With the highlights, the film was being exposed to a degree due to the opacifier being unable to block enough light. This resulted in people shooting it on the ‘dark’ setting making the blacks blacker, but their highlights would still be blown out from opacification failure, this effectively makes the film look too light AND too dark.
3. Heating of the film makes it behave faster in ISO speed, cooler development slows it. In the past, we typically have recommended heating our color films during development for increased contrast, but with the PZ 680 Cool, heating actually exaggerated the issue of the photos looking too bright and too dark in certain spots even more.

The best method to help ensure your images aren’t exposed to too much light, especially important when outside on sunny days, is to use a Spectra Frog Tongue AND use the shutter button delay trick: with Spectra cameras, until you let go of the shutter button, the photo won’t eject. So, when you press the shutter release to take your photo, hold the shutter button down until you have the chance to eject it into a dark bag/box etc. The same trick applies when using the self-timer, the image is taken after the countdown, but doesn’t eject until you turn the timer off. This trick works on nearly all models of Spectras (not 1200ff).

In general, the film should be shot with your Lighten/Darken switch to the center, if your images appear over exposed it’s likely from light exposure, to which I suggest using the delayed ejection. Even if the shot is shielded, high ambient light can affect the film, so avoiding light as best as possible and for several minutes is best. Any heating should be to mainly counter colder environments, but the film does not need to be generally heated like you might do with the other color films.

Keep your rollers clean,

-f

No. 385

Dr. Love's Tips - The Long Exposure

Patrick Tobin, | 1471 days ago

Hello, Impossibles! Welcome back to the wonderful world of Dr. Love. Today’s topic is one that has been requested a few times: The Long Exposure

Some people have written in either having issues with blurry images and not understanding why they were getting them, or simply asking how to make a good long exposure with Polaroid cameras.

Before you attempt this, you must understand the concept of a long exposure. When the camera is exposing the film, moving the camera can cause a motion blur. When in well-lit conditions, the exposure is so short that little movements have no effect. In lower light however, you need to be more careful, especially with SX-70s, because of the slower speed of the film.

First you need to know your camera. The easiest rule to know is that if you’re using one of the many types of standard 600 plastic box cameras, the longest exposure the camera allows is 1/4 second. This is meant to help prevent blurry images in general, but would also make trying to take a shot at night w/o flash very hard as it would be too dark.

Using an SX-70 camera or a Spectra camera, one can get longer exposures, up to a few seconds. The exact maximum can vary on specific models. First of all, this means if you’re shooting in low light, you need to be sure to steady your camera, as you will likely have a blurry image otherwise. Bracing yourself and/or your camera against a stationary object as well as holding your breath the moment you take the shot are easy and simple ways to do this, and of course using a tripod is the most reliable.

If you’re looking to take extended exposures, say at night, you can try tricking your camera in a couple ways. First you can either block the light meter with your finger, or simply tape something opaque over it, and this will result in maximum exposure so that any nearby bright lights will blow out and perhaps it will better expose your nightscape. The other trick, though a little more difficult, is you can try opening the camera door mid-exposure, this effectively turns your camera off with the shutter open exposing your film. The trick to this technique is being fast and steady, so as to open the door after the shutter has opened, but before it is trying to close, and not shaking the camera too much in the process. The advantage to this trick is you can take extended exposures in very dark settings. To finish the exposure, typically just closing the door and another press on the shutter button should finish the cycle as normal. Fair warning that this technique is not guaranteed to be consistent and you shouldn’t do it if you’re not comfortable with it, but it can produce very cool images.

In general, just remember that until you hear the motor run to eject the frame, the camera is still exposing, so keep your camera steady.

As always, keep your rollers clean,

-f

If you have a topic you’d like Dr. Love to cover, please email usa@theimpossibleproject.com

No. 366

Dr. Love - The Importance of Being Shielded

Patrick Tobin, | 1485 days ago

Hello from Impossible! Dr. Love is back with another informative post in which he revisits the importance of shielding your images…

“Some people have asked some follow up questions to our Opacification post, and as the days are getting longer, we wanted to help stress the use of Impossible Films on those bright sunny summer days.

To simply summarize the main point from the opacification post, Impossible films are still sensitive to light in the first moments out of the camera. This is because the protective layer within the film that is there to protect the film can’t yet block out enough light in many situations that it needs an outside aide. (See photos below as examples of poorly-shielded and well-shielded images, respectively).

Depending on the camera you have, there are 3 very simple ways to protect your film in nearly every situation. If you have a standard ‘box type’ 600 or SX-70 camera (except One600 type), you can get a Frog Tongue and then you’ll never have to worry about whether you have a cover on your camera again. As well as a Frog tongue made for Spectra Cameras, this will always uncurl over the film keeping a good seal on it to help protect in even the brightest conditions like at the beach.

The next is if you have a folding camera like the Original SX-70s or an SLR 680, you can get the Impossible PX Shade, as this is similarly designed to keep close contact with the film frame as it is coming out of the camera to help prevent light from seeping in the sides and flash the film.

Lastly, if you’re in a pinch, every pack of film you start gives you a simple-to-use shade just from putting the pack in your camera, that of course is the dark slide. The dark slide is a black matte material that can be used is various ways depending on your camera type to help keep your film covered from strong light. To see an example of how to shield with a dark slide, watch this video

The main things to keep in mind are…
1. Film is most sensitive the first moment it starts to come out of the camera
2. The brighter your environment, the more of a need there is to shield and shield well
3. Even if in a darker space, remember that a long exposure with a little light can be the same as a quick exposure to bright light.

If you remember and apply these main points, you can’t go wrong, and using a Frog Tongue or PX Shade will let you shoot with more thought to your shot and less to how to handle it. Now get out there, enjoy the Spring, and happy shooting.

Keep your rollers clean,

-f

No. 313

Building a casette for testing old cameras

Frank Love | 1520 days ago

If the batteries in your empty Impossible film cassettes are running low and too weak to test old Polaroid cameras we have received a nice idea by Jasper Ellens. He simply bought a flat rechargeable 6 volt battery in the local hardware store and installed this in a empty pack.

Like this you get an empty film casette ready to quasi endlessly test your Polaroid cameras shutter and motor operation.

No. 299

Taming PUSH! film

Frank Love | 1537 days ago

From its inception PX70 PUSH! film challenged photographers with its unique chemical composition and specific shooting requirements. Now that it has aged it has become a different beast all together – one that requires an extra level of taming. We recommend considering the following crucial points when working with PX 70 Color Shade PUSH! film:

LIGHT
A strong flash will support image details the best. Use of artificial or day light will create a more soft-focus effect.

DISTANCE
The closer the motif, the better the results!

MOTIF
Don’t go for the white horse in the snow. Only motifs that are rich in contrast and color will create decent results.

TEMPERATURE
PX 70 Color Shade PUSH! film has always preferred warm temperatures while shooting and processing (more than 15°C/59°F). Flickr Forum – Heating Your PUSH!

SHIELDING
Make absolutely sure that NO light at all hits the image as it ejects from the camera. Click here for all shielding methods

TIME
Be patient. PX 70 Color Shade PUSH! images need about 12 hours to to fully develop and display final results.

PRESERVATION
To make sure your PUSH! images do not fade over time or shift to a blue color due to humidity, we recommend lifting or peeling the image. Click here for a Lifting tutorial.

No. 273

Impossible No More…An Instant Workshop at Aperture!

Jon Campolo | 1566 days ago

Feb 4th, 2012
1-3:30pm
Aperture Tremont
2541 Scranton Rd.
Cleveland
OH 44113

As one of the few and privileged Impossible “Partner Store Plus” spaces in the USA, our friends at Aperture Tremont are hosting their first workshop ever, offering you an exclusive perspective on new Impossible films, tricks and tips.

During this hands-on workshop they’ll be covering techniques of working with Impossible film and vintage Polaroid cameras. The workshop will be ran by Aperture owner and photographer, Scott Meivogel, plus Cleveland Polaroid expert, Tim Logan. Tim shot for our One Hundred Impossible Portraits event last year, with fantastic results!

Finally, 1/3 of the workshop will be spent photographing two live models dressed in perfect vintage attire. Participants are guaranteed to leave with photographs that’ll knock their socks off, taken with the latest Impossible film! If you have your own Polaroid camera, please feel free to bring it. If not, they’ll have loaner cameras for you to use while you’re there.

Registration is $39.99 and includes a pack of Impossible film as well as refreshments. Registration can be completed by calling 216-574-8977, or purchasing on Aperture’s website HERE.

No. 271

Dr. Love's Tips – Mirror Mirror In My Camera...

Jon Campolo | 1568 days ago

The good doctor.

Another topic we got requests for was when the mirror in the camera gets stuck up out of place or mid cycle for one reason or another. This can often be recognized by a black VF and a camera that won’t close all the way.

There’s actually a couple tricks to getting your mirror back in place. If your camera is empty and you have an empty pack, you can try to put that in the camera and fire it a few times, or put the pack in, pull it out, back in, out a couple of times letting it cycle each time you close the door. This may get the camera back into the proper rhythm of things so that when you put a full pack in, everything is where it should be for proper operation to take pictures.

If this doesn’t work, or if the camera cycles but is still ‘off’, there is a more manual way to reset the mirror. Open your camera and look to the side of the camera behind the shutter button. You’ll see there’s a long strip of black plastic that runs the length of the camera next to the bellows. This plastic covers the drivetrain or gears to the camera that moves the power from the motor to the rollers and controlling the pick arm and mirror movement along the way as well.

To access the gears, you remove the plastic by pulling up from the front first, it will come up slightly in the front, then move a little further down and pull the rest up with a little ‘wiggle’ so as not to pull too much as to break it. Once the cover is off, you’ll see the series of gears. To reset your mirror, find the last gear towards the back of the camera that you can comfortably put your thumb on. Start winding the gear in the direction of least resistance. If you wind and after a few turns it suddenly has more resistance, wind the other direction. It could take about 30+ seconds to hand wind the mirror back in to place so be patient. Simply wind until you hear that usual ‘snap’ which is the sound of the picking arm resting, and what you hear when you normally take a picture. Once you hear this, look through the VF and you should see clearly though it, the camera should be able to close completely, and if you open the film door you should see the mirror on the top flat and flush with the top.

To put the black plastic cover back on, start at the back, and it should fit neatly back into place without forcing anything, and make sure nothing is outside the chrome or plastic outer body. This may take more than one try, but the main thing to remember is don’t force it.

Once the cover is back on, the camera should be able to close freely and completely, and you can again try the camera. If the VF is still black but the camera closes completely, be sure the top VF is fully extended for if it isn’t, the mirrors do not align properly to see an image. You can test the VF by pressing down on the top front and making sure it has a ‘springy’ response to your pressure. If the VF doesn’t spring back, you may need to put the spring back on the mirror as described in the cleaning and maintenance post.

If you still experience issues, your camera may need repair, but at least you now know how to reset the mirror so that you can close the camera and it can travel safely to a repair shop.

Keep your rollers clean, -f

No. 263

Dr. Love's Film Tips - The Undeveloped Patch

Patrick Tobin, | 1573 days ago

The good doctor.

This week, Impossible USA’s Camera Resource Manager Frank Love speaks about the dreaded divots!…

Something all of you have most likely seen by now, either in your shots or in shots we’ve posted, is that little patch that can occasionally show up on the top of our films. Depending on who you talk to, this can be called a ‘divot’, ‘undeveloped patch’, or even a ‘mushroom’ or ‘snowflake’ depending on its appearance.

Now, this phenomena is certainly not new with Impossible films, it’s simply that most people have either never used or forgotten about Polaroid’s earlier films that would have experienced coverage issues, or are only used to seeing it in expired film, that it’s gotten a little more attention of late.

What this is comes down to the fact that the developer paste, also called reagent, did not spread over the entire surface of the film, and that ‘patch’ is the place where it did not cover. That brown or grey patch is the negative you’re seeing. It earns its ‘snowflake’ nickname from the kind of starburst around it that sometimes happens.

The reason behind the developer paste not spreading fully is simple, however the cause is not always so clear-cut. The reason is uneven spreading of the paste. The paste will spread more thickly in some areas than in others, thus running out before it can cover the full frame. The opposite of this shortage can result in the paste leaking out of the top back when the paste spreads a little thin.

As for the causes, there are several variables that affect the spreading of the paste. The first and most direct is the rollers. Rollers from one camera to another can be slightly different in their ‘gaps’, and certain models have typically tighter or wider gaps in general. A camera with a lot of use or that’s not been cared for well may have rollers that lose proper alignment so they aren’t even to begin with. I’d say the most common issue with rollers however is when they get dirty. If there is a build up of paste on rollers this can cause uneven development, not just resulting in little spots on the film, but it can make the entire frame spread differently sometimes, so as I’ve stressed before, keep your rollers clean. Aside from the rollers, temperature can also be a factor in the thickness of the paste spreading, so shooting in more extreme temperatures can cause either the patch or paste leaking.

Essentially this is due in part to the new films being still more sensitive to these factors. Polaroid had engineered their films to be very resilient to all of these factors over decades of research with their formula, so that in time, the new films can also build up a resistance to them. In the mean time, the best things you can do is keep your rollers clean and avoid extreme temps for processing. If the problem is persistent, you can try this trick (with caution) from our video: Avoiding The Notorious Undeveloped Patch, or if you use a 680, you can try swapping your film door with that of another camera (680’s generally have a wider roller set so swapping its door with that of an older SX-70 can also help).

Hope this helps some of you get better coverage out of your shots, and as always, keep your rollers clean,

-f

No. 262

Dr. Love's Film Tips - Cold Weather

Patrick Tobin, | 1574 days ago

The good doctor.

We’re proud to introduce a new feature on the Impossible Blog: Dr. Love’s Film Tips. Each week, Frank Love, Impossible USA’s Camera Resources Manager, will provide guidance on how to get the best from your Impossible images. This episode concerns shooting Impossible film in cold weather…

With the temperatures dropping, there are some things to keep in mind when shooting instant film in cold weather. Since instant film is a film lab in each frame, the temperature you’re shooting in can greatly affect each frame you shoot, for good or bad. Something to keep in mind is any instant film needs to be at at least 50ºF/10ºC for processing. This means if you’re shooting in temperatures below this, you have to get your film warm once it’s out of the camera.

The easiest thing you have at your disposal is your own body heat. Using an inside coat pocket or putting it under your arm under your jacket work great. Using an Impossible Cold Clip can also help ensure a warm place for putting the film for processing. The main things to remember is get your film warm as soon as possible while keeping it covered, and be careful not to bend the frames when tucking them away as this can tear the film sheets and damage your image.

Revisit our video offering tips for shooting in cold weather as it does illustrate these practices in action.

-Dr. Love

No. 261

Dr. Love's Tips – To Maintain or Not To Maintain

Jon Campolo | 1574 days ago

The good doctor.

We put out the question to you all about what kinds of tips you all would like to hear. One topic we heard several times was about cleaning and maintenance of your folding SX-70 and SLR 680 cameras.

There are a few simple things you can do to help keep your cameras running well and looking good. Now not to sound like a broken record, but I again cannot stress keeping your rollers clean. You can refer back to our Door swapping post about how to get the door off your camera to make cleaning easier and safer. Then you can go back to our first video with Dave about cleaning rollers for how to do this.

After that you can keep the inside of your camera clean with a can of compressed air or an air blower some of you may have for keeping lenses clean which can help keep dust out of the film compartment of the camera. Don’t forget that mirror you can see inside the camera is like another lens element because the image is reflected off that mirror to expose the film. A hair or smudge on this mirror may show up on your shots, and if there is a smudge, try cleaning it with a lens cloth taped to the end of something long and thin like a chopstick or handle of a dinner knife. Just be careful of the picking arm in the back left corner, and don’t apply too much upward pressure on the mirror.  

A lot of people have asked about cleaning bellows as well. Using Windex is actually a great tool for this. Apply to lens cloth or something lintless and soft, and here again, do not apply too much pressure and of course avoid anything pointy or sharp as you wipe it over the bellows to get them shiny and black again.

As to the lens you can clean like any other camera’s, same with the lens of the VF. Now if the VF mirror needs cleaning, you can lower the skirt of the VF by pressing up slightly at the center at the top of the front of the skirt whirr these two clips are that hold it there, then lower it allowing you access from the sides and do the lens cloth on a chopstick again, knife handle is likely too big. Be sure not to not the spring off, or if it is off simply put the hook back over the side of the mirror like in the included picture. To put skirt back into place simple raise the skirt back up and tuck the clips back under, and you can press the VF down as if to close it, and upon closing it should snap back in just as it was.

If you have a need for cleaning anything internally like the mirrors aside from the film compartment or the VF, we recommend sending it to a professional repair shop as the only way to access these is to take the camera apart. This most likely isn’t necessary, but for this we recommend PHOTOTECH here in NYC if you’re in the US.

Lastly, for general maintenance on the camera, the best thing for it is to be getting used with some regularity. If your camera hasn’t been picked up in a while, if it’s empty load an empty pack into it and fire off some ‘blanks’ to ‘warm it up’. If the camera isn’t responsive initially, refer to our SX-70 CPR post and make sure the battery in the pack is good. If your camera sounds whiny, this is often caused by carbon build up on the motor or the lubricant drying a bit, and firing the camera is the best way to get this worked out. Note however if the sound does not improve after a couple of days of periodical exercise for 5 minutes at a time a couple times during the day, or in fact worsens, the camera likely needs repair. If you already use your camera nearly daily, this shouldn’t be necessary and if anything you should try not to ‘overuse’ the camera, if you have more than one you can rotate them.

Hope this info helps and as always, keep your rollers clean, -f

No. 248

Dr. Love's Film Tips - The Dry Age Kit

Patrick Tobin, | 1596 days ago

The good doctor.

To Dry Age or Not to Dry Age: that is the question.

Many of you may have seen or at least heard about our Dry Age Kits. For anyone who is still asking themselves, “What is a Dry Age Kit and why do I need one?” I hope to answer some of your questions.

First of all the Dry Age Kit is all about preservation. As Impossible films are not 100% stable, there is one key factor in getting the frames to ‘cure’ or ‘set’, and that is oxidation. So long as the film is still ‘wet’ from the initial chemical process, it is slowly oxidizing, in the same way that metal rusts (please see example image). It is silver in fact in the Silver Shade films. The faster the film dries, the less it is affected by the oxidation.

So how does the Dry Age Kit factor in? The Dry Age Kit allows you to keep your film in a known stable environment allowing your film to cure and dry as soon as possible.

For anyone in a generally dry environment, you may not even notice the effects that can occur to the film, those who live in warmer, more humid climates may not know anything but. The Dry Age Kit is an equalizer that is a moisture sealed packet with moisture absorbing silica and an indicator to let you know when it needs to be recharged. It is to your film after shooting what the refrigerator is to your film before shooting. It’s a constant that can equalize your situation to ensure the best performance out of Impossible films, no matter where you are or the conditions in which you’re shooting.

The main things to remember, with or without the Dry Age Kit, is to ensure the best conditions until the film has noticeably stiffened so that it isn’t as soft and pliable as when you first shot it, but rather is a little ‘springy’. To do this, keep the film somewhere cool, dry, away from direct sun, and keep the frames standing upright with the pods on the bottom. These conditions are the most conducive for drying, and the Dry Age Kit is the added piece that helps with the hardest one of those.

Keep your rollers clean,

-f

No. 235

Photogram Workshop with Patrick Winfield - Recap

Jon Campolo | 1604 days ago

This past Sunday, The Impossible Project celebrated the meticulous art of the Instant Photogram with Patrick Winfield ! Although mastering Patrick’s techniques proved to be quite challenging, workshop attendees worked diligently in the pitch dark to craft wonderfully surprising photograms of their favorite objects. After giving an inspiring history of the photogram, Patrick took the class through a series of integral steps in making photograms possible. Using jewelry, toys, cassette tapes, colored filters and many other assorted items, attendees took turns in a blacked-out NYC Space with only a pack of opened film, a flashlight and their newly acquired skills.

As you can see from our blog’s gallery, the results were fantastic! Thank you to all who participated and to Patrick Winfield of course! We hope he returns very soon to lead another workshop filled with more secret techniques.

Feel free to sign up for our weekly newsletter to always stay up to date on everything Impossible. Call 212-219-3254 or email nycspace@the-impossible-project.com for more info.

No. 218

New Spectra Workshop at The Impossible Project Space NYC

Jon Campolo, | 1619 days ago

December 11th, 2011
10am - 1pm
The Impossible Project Space NYC
425 Broadway
5th Floor
New York NY 10013

By popular demand, The Impossible Project is pleased to announce the return of The Spectra Workshop at the New York Space.
On Sunday, December 11th, the Impossible NYC space will hold a three-hour interactive tutorial on getting the best out of the Polaroid Spectra camera and the Impossible film range.

This workshop is designed to explore the Spectra camera’s full potential and versatility, including an outline of all the camera’s unique accessories and attachments. We will cover in detail all that The Impossible Project film has to offer, including shielding techniques, temperature control and identifying and managing each film type’s unique characteristics.

Workshop participants will then have the opportunity to explore all the photogenic wonders of SOHO, Little Italy and Chinatown with two of Impossible’s experienced staff photographers and then re-convene back at the space to discuss images, ask questions and talk about image preservation techniques.

• When: Sunday, December 11th, 2011, 10am – 1pm
• Where: Impossible Project Space, 425 Broadway, Floor 5, NYC 10013
• Registration: (212) 219 3254 or nycspace@theimpossibleproject.com
Please notify when registering if renting a camera at no extra cost
• Fee: $50 (price includes 1 pack PZ 680 Color Shade & Frog Tongue)

No. 217

The Photogram Workshop with Patrick Winfield

Jon Campolo, | 1619 days ago

December 3rd, 2011
5 - 6:30pm

Impossible Project NYC Space
425 Broadway
5th Floor
New York NY 10013

On Saturday, December 3rd, from 5pm-6:30pm, artist Patrick Winfield will appear in person at The Impossible Project Space NYC to present a brief slideshow history of The Photogram. Then, using Impossible instant film material, he will demonstrate his own distinctive techniques to create photograms similar to the ones pictured here.

Attendees will be supplied with one pack of Impossible color film, a Polaroid 600 camera, flashlights, transparencies and colored gels. You’re welcome to bring your own photogram objects also! Each participant will get 10% off any store purchase the night of the class.

Don’t miss this very rare opportunity to be involved in an exclusive interactive class by one of the world’s leading instant artists!

WHEN: Saturday, December 3rd, 2011 – 5pm to 6:30pm

WHERE: Impossible Project Space NYC – 425 Broadway, 5th Floor

REGISTRATION: $95
RSVP/Questions: (212) 219-3254 or nycspace@theimpossibleproject.com

More Info About Patrick Winfield:
Patrick is a Brooklyn based artist whose work is about accidents and how these flaws become a form of perfection. “I may jam or manipulate the films to play up the surface, the tangibility of the film medium. I create a moment out of several various instances – a walking perspective controlled and pulled in by the structure of the grid, not an instant view, but a clustering of memories and visuals. Each photo is competing with the image as a whole, causing this movement of the eye as it takes in a single image then back to the whole.”
Patrick’s work has been featured in an array of arts and design magazines and blogs and you may have recently seen his work at Urban Outfitters – the result of a 2010 collaboration.

No. 164

Shooting Impossible Film in Cold Weather

Josie Keefe, | 1670 days ago

Doctor Frank is back with another dose of Impossible Solutions. Now that winter is ahead, shooting Impossible Silver Shade film can be a bit more of a challenge. Watch this video if you have been shooting outside and getting white images without much definition. Frank tells you how to use your body heat to warm up the film to the desired processing temperature in order to create a beautiful instant photograph.

No. 132

The Impossible Workshop Series – Spectra!

Jon Campolo, | 1733 days ago

August 21, 2011
10AM–1PM
Impossible Project NYC Space
425 Broadway
5th Floor
New York NY 10013

Impossible America is pleased to present the next exciting workshop in our New York Space series.

Sunday August 21st, The Impossible NYC space will hold a 3 hour interactive tutorial on getting the best out of your Polaroid Spectra or 1200 type camera and getting the most out of all the Impossible film range.

After briefly exploring your Spectra camera’s full potential and versatility including unique accessories and attachments, we will then outline all that our new instant film has to offer. From shielding techniques to temperature control to identifying and managing each film types unique characteristics.

We’ll let you loose in the city streets to explore all the photogenic wonders of SOHO, Little Italy and Chinatown with two of our experienced photographers and then re convene back at the space to discuss your images, ask questions and talk about image preservation techniques.

Cost for the workshop is $75. Register today! Call (212) 219-3254 to RSVP or with questions; all major credit cards accepted.

No. 107

600 Workshop @ Impossible NYC Space

Jon Campolo, | 1766 days ago

July 10 & 17, 2011
10AM - 1PM
Impossible NYC Space
425 Broadway
5th Floor
New York NY 10013

  • JULY 10 WORKSHOP FULL! EXTRA DATE ADDED ON SUNDAY JULY 17TH.

On Sunday July 10th, The Impossible NYC Space will hold a 3 hour interactive workshop on getting the best out of your Polaroid 600 camera and the most out of all the Impossible 600 films.

After briefly exploring your 600 camera’s full potential and versatility, we will then outline all that our new instant film has to offer – From shielding techniques to temperature control to identifying and managing each film’s unique characteristics.

We’ll let you loose in the city streets to explore all the photogenic wonders of SOHO, Little Italy and Chinatown with two of our experienced photographers and then re convene back at the space to discuss your images, ask questions and talk about image preservation techniques.

Time: 10:00am to 1:00pm
Special Introductory Price: $50 (includes one free pack of PX680 film and free use of a Polaroid camera)
Call the NYC Space to make your reservation today at (212) 219–3254

No. 31

Film Handling and Traveling

Josie Keefe, | 1988 days ago

Doctor Frank is back with another installment of Impossible Solutions. Here he shows us how to properly handle and store film for optimal performance. He also explains how to safely travel with film, without risking xray damage to your film. Watch the video to learn how to pack your film, and learn films need special treatment in the airport.

No. 29

Reskinning an Sx70

Josie Keefe, | 1993 days ago

Doctor Jon here with a very special installment of Impossible Solutions. Here Jon shows us how to refurbish the leather skin of an Sx 70, making it look new for the next generation of Sx 70 photographers.

No. 26

A Flash of Color!

Jon Campolo, | 1999 days ago

Our new PX70 PUSH! film needs a LOT of light to soak in all those wonderful colors you want to capture. Recently, the Impossible team has been testing PUSH! with flash bars and the colors are looking brilliant.

From left to right:
Exposure wheel untouched, exposure wheel 1 click towards white, and exposure wheel ALL THE WAY white.

Try getting up close and personal, and with a flash bar, shed some light on a colorful situation!

No. 23

Swapping Film Packs

Josie Keefe, | 2003 days ago

Hi everybody! Dr. Frank is back with another informative instructional video; here he shows you how to swap film packs without wasting any film. Watch the video to learn how to switch between packs of film, or change packs if the pack battery dies.

No. 18

Buying an SX 70

Josie Keefe, | 2016 days ago

This short video gives you a list of common problems to look out for when buying a vintage SX 70 online or at a flea market. Frank explains how to visually check to make sure the camera is in working order; he lists the most frequent problems and what to ask the seller to ensure you are buying a quality camera.

No. 9

Light Protection

Josie Keefe, | 2037 days ago

Frank is back with another installment of Impossible Solutions! In this video Frank teaches us how to protect light sensitive film while its developing to avoid overexposure. If you are planning on shooting Color Shade, Silver Shade, or if your images ever turn out white, be sure to watch this video for some quick tips to get beautiful results.

No. 6

Sticky Film Packs

Josie Keefe, | 2047 days ago

Frank is back with another installment of impossible solutions, showing us how to deal with sticky packs of film that won’t eject pictures. Watch the video for easy to follow instructions to save time and film!