No. 1218

Analog Travelog: Claus-Dieter Kurz in New York

Ilona Cerowska, | Dec 4, 06:00 PM

Welcome back to Impossible’s Analog Travelog! In this series, we showcase fantastic Impossible photos taken on voyages the world over. This entry comes from Claus-Dieter Kurz, who recently took a trip to New York and documented his trip using Impossible film.

At the end of October, my wife Karin and I went on a short trip to the Big Apple, the capital of the world – New York City. It was the first time for me and the 5th time for Karin – so she was my guide.

This trip was by invitation of The Impossible Project – as a prize for a Facebook competition, for finding a name for the American Airstream Trailer during its promotion tour through the States this spring and summer. My proposal, “SILVERSHADE” was chosen as being the perfect match for the unique trailer as the name of the first Impossible instant film, kicking off the success story of the revival of analog instant photography.

I have been a dedicated follower of The Impossible Project from the very beginning. I started to collect Polaroid analog cameras some time ago for shooting Impossible films. So for our New York Adventure, I was able to choose between several SX-70 folding- and 600 Box type cameras. Finally I decided for a SX-70 Sonar Autofocus and a 635 CL Supercolor from my collection. I did not carry any films, as I knew that the X-rays at the airport could damage the film material. So I wanted to buy the films on our arrival in New York.

After visiting the NY Impossible team in Brooklyn at their cool new premises in Industrial City, Karin and I started the New York Adventure by walking over Brooklyn Bridge. I loaded my Sonar Autofocus with a SX-70 B&W White Frame which was a present from the Impossible Team: thanks I have to say that I am not a professional photographer, but I have some passion to find the right motif for the right shot. So it can happen, that I forget to set the dark wheel to the proper position before I press the button or that I disregard the proper light conditions. I try to hide the photo from light immediately after ejection which is sometimes a challenge, but in the meantime I have developed a certain technique for that.

After Brooklyn Bridge we moved onto the real magic and the impressive 9/11 Memorial and Financial District. After that we visited Chelsea Market and walked over the High Line and through Gansevoort Street. We followed a tip from Impossible NY to buy Impossible films at B&H Photostore, where I bought another SX-70 Color White Frame film and a 600 B&W Black Frame.

The next day, on Halloween, we continued with the Thin Iron Building and its surroundings, then moved onto Greenwich Village and Soho. In the evening we watched the traditional Halloween parade. Unfortunately I had no flash light with me, so I did not dare to shoot any Impossible photos. Tired from walking all day, we were happy to finally come home to our hotel, The Pod 51, in 51st Street.

The last day was rainy, but we headed to Hell’s Kitchen to visit some of the international food places and the famous flea market. But unluckily the market was closed due to the rain. So we decided to walk up to Central Park and visit the Guggenheim Museum. After an interesting exhibition named ZERO we had to return to our hotel to pick up our luggage and drive to the airport in order to catch our flight back to Vienna.

The time in New York was very inspiring and intensive. My wife and I enjoyed it very much and we know, that we will come back. Cheers again to all the people from the Impossible team for making this dream come true.

Claus-Dieter lives in Vienna, Austria and works as a finance professional. Aside from analog photography, he is passionate about music, fashion, endurance sports (including Ironman) and vegan food. You can see more of his pictures on the Impossible Gallery on Facebook and Twitter.

No. 1183

Impossible x Plywerk : Ingrained Authenticity

Ilona Cerowska, | Oct 24, 02:38 PM

This week we add three sleek wooden standing frames to our accessories shop in collaboration with Plywerk, designed to elegantly display your SX-70, 600 and Spectra film imagery. From their homegrown workshop in Portland, Oregon, this eco-conscious outfit handcraft each of their products from locally-sourced, sustainable materials. Debbie Vesey, Impossible’s Accessories Manager who coordinated the partnership says: “The chemical artistry which goes into making Impossible film is modern and transformative, it can hold its own and deserves space to breathe; the ‘Stanley’ design ensures your instant photos take center stage.”

Much like our Impossible film, the use of up-cycled walnut wood in the ‘Stanley’ frame design means there will always be slight variations between grain patterns—ensuring each hand-crafted iteration of this timeless design form is guaranteed one of a kind. We spoke to co-founders Kjell van Zoen and Kim Oanh Nguyen-van Zoen about why they are are so passionately committed to quality workmanship, and an overall concept that is more than just green.

How does the up-cycled Western walnut wood used in your ‘Stanley’ frame design concept imbue its charm?

First of all it’s VERY local, all Pacific NW, sustainably grown, we had an opportunity to up-cycle it (triple the eco-diligence: sustainable, up-cycled and local) and it’s often not favored by woodworkers due to the inconsistencies within the wood in the form of Knots, Burrs, Veins, & Burl (instead Eastern Walnut is often preferred). We love the fact that the process is so full of natural surprises; each and every ‘Stanley’ is 100% unique.

At Plywerk you emphasize a human attachment to your work, why do you think it feels different holding a photo in your hand or displaying it in real life—as opposed to sharing a snap via social media online?

We remember a time before the internet. We remember that taking pictures meant thinking about the amount of film you have on you; waiting for just the right moment to capture; thinking about the ones you want to print and display. There was craft and design in this endeavor. Much of this craft has been lost in the fire hose of mass-produced images that flood our online-world. We feel that craft and design is not about carbon-copy, mass-produced, cheaper-is-better products. Our designs are about applying minimal aesthetics and function to responsibly sourced materials, and producing our product on-demand, by-hand in our workshop.

How important is it that we still remember to display imagery around our living spaces, and not just within virtual reality?

Whether art that provokes deep reflection or photos that stir feelings of nostalgia, everyone has a handful of images they love to have around them as they go about their day. We design and handcraft eco-conscious photo frames and display products to help people get their images offline and into the tangible world we live in.

If you could offer some words of inspiration to others who are interested in learning more about sustainability themselves, what would these be?

The world can no longer afford more products that deplete our natural resources faster than they can replenish themselves. Have a system in place to vet the product you’re making before going too far. We use the four systems conditions of the Natural Step Framework to assess the life-cycle of every product we produce. I encourage you to incorporate a similar kind of rigor into assessing the environmental impact of your product by making it part of the design process. Plus, don’t just make another mass-produced carbon-copy product. Work with the wealth of inherent beauty and diversity that nature has to offer and use it to your advantage to create products where each one is unique.

If you happen to visit Portland, be sure to stop by the Plywerk workshop to join Kjell and his team for a behind the scenes tour and see ‘Stanley’ being crafted firsthand. Specially designed to hold SX-70, 600 and Spectra format images, Plywerk’s timeless walnut display stands are available to purchase from the Impossible online shop now!

Article by Amy Heaton

No. 1159

Meet Impossible USA: Patrick Tobin, Customer Services Manager

Ilona Cerowska, | Sep 19, 01:12 PM

Patrick Tobin

Patrick Tobin is Impossible’s North American Customer Services Manager. He has been with the company since May, 2011, when Impossible’s first color film for 600 cameras was introduced. Before joining Impossible, he was a teacher.

Please describe your role in more detail.
I’m responsible for supporting all of Impossible’s North American customers, whether they’re individuals buying from us online or wholesale customers. I’ve gained a lot of knowledge in my time with Impossible and I enjoy passing it on to customers to ensure that they get the absolute best out of their Impossible film and cameras. In addition, I travel to retail partner stores to train store staff in the use of Impossible products so that they might, in turn, help their customers to better understand the products. I assist the wholesale sales team with order entry, as well as take phone orders, assist with content creation for new products in the online shop, and a lot more.

What do you enjoy most about working at Impossible?
I’m honored to be a part of a company that is keeping instant film alive. What Impossible has done is incredible and, as a user of instant film myself, I don’t know what I’d do without it. I love spreading the word about the product and getting others excited about using it.

What do you find the most challenging (or depressing)?
There is always a lot of work to be done and we have a very small team, so it can be overwhelming at times. But I’m good at rolling with it and am able to juggle the many tasks that come up.

What’s your personal take on analog instant photography?
Analog instant photography has its own place in the world, as digital photography does. There is room for both. I always tell people it’s like vinyl records and MP3s. Each has its own individual sound. The same can be said for analog instant film and digital photography. However, I prefer instant film, because you have a unique tangible print that will last forever. How often do people honestly print out the hundreds of digital photos they take?

Do you think there is still a high level passion for the medium within the company?
Yes. I think the bottom line is that we know we are part of something special with the rebirth of instant film. We understand the challenges the factory team and chemists have faced. I am appreciative of the fact that I can use instant film again.

How did the company’s recent restructuring and job losses affect you personally? Is there anything positive likely to come out of it?
Several of my good friends were let go, which is sad for me, after having worked alongside them for years in such a close environment. We all worked well together and made the US office what it is. I do understand that changes need to be made in order to make progress in the further improvement of the film, as the product is the bottom line, and perhaps our office expanded a little too much a little too early in the company’s history. But, that doesn’t make it any easier to say goodbye to such amazing people. Hopefully moving forward, the film will improve monumentally and become easier to use for the customer, and we can then make and sell more film, in order to grow the company even more.

Where does the American wing of the company go now?
With a growing line of products and improvements in the film, we will be reaching a larger audience. We need to focus on our customers and build on our existing user base through marketing, social media, collaborations and promotions.

What do you hope for Impossible in the year ahead?
I hope the film gets better in terms of development time, light-sensitivity and color balance, across all formats. I hope we can sell more film and eventually make more film so the costs can come down a bit. I hope we can find new customers who are still unaware of the product and what they can do with it. I hope the US team settles nicely into our new location and proves to be even more productive.

No. 1155

Meet Impossible USA: Liora Klein, Camera Manufacturing Manager

Lucile Le Doze | Sep 12, 05:49 PM

Liora Klein

Liora Klein is the manager of Impossible’s US-based camera refurbishment team. She joined the company just a year ago. Before that she was, “just a girl who moved to NY with some money stashed away in a bank and no ‘day job’, looking for a sink-or-swim moment while freelancing motorsport and wedding photography”.

Please describe your responsibilities.
I lead the US camera refurbishment department. We source classic Polaroid cameras, then refurbish and repair them, and later box them up and ship them out to customers. I make sure my employees have all the direction and supplies they need to get their day-to-day duties done while consulting with Sales to make sure we are able to supply what the market demands.

Give a snapshot of your day at Impossible.
Giving my employees daily goals that need to be met, answering emails, crunching numbers and forecasting for the future, consulting with Finance and Operations about any processes we can change or handle with more ease, rewarding my employees with pizza lunches and drinking gallons of coffee.

What do you find the most interesting or exciting about working at Impossible?
Being surrounded by fellow creative types. My job, although it might seem like a management position, is unlike any other I’ve had. Being a photographer and a shooter of our film, I already had a passion deeper into the company than seeing it as just a job. We always get to test and play with new film, and we’re encouraged to shoot and give feedback. I honestly shoot more now that I have this ‘day job’ more than I did with all my free time while I was freelancing.

What do you find the most challenging?
I want to get this department functioning like a well-oiled machine that just produces so much, there will never be a need for back-ordered cameras again and we’ll be able to supply more options to our customers than ever before. Because we are not working with raw material but instead rely on procurement, the number of cameras we are able to get in can vary. With the new process improvements I’ve been able to make within the department, I see those dreams becoming a reality soon.

What have been the most significant changes you have seen in the company over the past year?
Specifically on our American side and within this department, I see we have become much more organized. We have gotten past the days of rushed orders and we can all breathe a little better on a daily basis. Speaking of the company globally, I see an honest focus back onto the film, which is the original and true soul of the company.

What is your personal take on analog instant photography?
#filmisnotdead. Being one of the many photographers that started solely on film, and only making the switch to digital three years ago, I’ve always appreciated the instant medium for the fact that it’s instant. It’s magic watching the images appear before your eyes, outside of a darkroom and without use of additional chemicals. Many can argue that digital is literally now instant, but it will never be that tangible moment that you can hold in your hand right then and there and that can never be exactly replicated. It’s what makes it so unique.

Do you think there is still a high level passion for the medium within the company?
Absolutely! We all love shooting the film. I encourage my employees to take cameras home if they have none of their own to shoot on weekends, vacations or for no particular reason at all. As I said before, everyone that works here is a creative in their own right and all have a passion for different forms of photography. We’re constantly learning from each other.

How did the company’s recent restructuring and job losses affect you personally?
I, personally, have been given more responsibility, leading what is now the main department of the US operation. While thoroughly excited to move everyone into a new space and really get this department jump-started with new processes, it was a great loss of all those who had to leave. They truly built the US Impossible and without them we wouldn’t be where we are today. I miss their personalities in the office, a lot, and hope they come to visit and hang out in our new space whenever they want, as they will always be a part of our family. The positive of this new restructuring is that we can really start fresh and focus on just manufacturing, while EU can focus on our film.

Where does the American wing of the company go now?
We pack up, move to Brooklyn to a very new creative community that’s being built out of gorgeous refurbished warehouses, and get our butts into gear.

What do you think of the new line up of film products and the planned new camera?
I can’t wait to see what the camera ends up looking like and what features it has! I think we’ve needed our own camera all along. I also think our film will flourish now that we can devote more of our focus onto it.

What do you hope for Impossible in the year ahead?
I want to see Impossible become a name of film that people are no longer hesitant to purchase or try. I want to see it become more affordable so that anyone who wants to shoot it, can. I want people to be able to purchase all styles of refurbished Polaroid cameras from us so that a whole new generation, the ones that have never touched analog in any form, can have these as staples in their homes much as we did growing up. That last might take longer than a year to achieve, but I’m still throwing it in with the rest of my answer.

No. 1150

Meet Impossible USA: Frank Love, Director of US Operations

Lucile Le Doze, | Sep 5, 04:43 PM

Frank Love, Impossible’s Director of US Operations

Over the next week or so, we’d like to introduce you to Impossible USA’s team-members, soon to be based in a new office and camera refurbishment facility in Brooklyn.

Frank Love, Impossible’s Director of US Operations, has been with the company “just shy of four and a half years”. Prior to joining Impossible, he was a union Assistant Cameraman for motion pictures, television and commercials.

Frank oversees all Impossible operations, IT, and logistics in North America: “Basically, I make sure things are kept running, people have tools to do their jobs, and that things are where they need to be,” he says.

Give a ‘snapshot’ of your day at Impossible.
A typical day for me is checking in with the EU team in the morning, and responding to any pertinent emails. From there it’s mainly ensuring inbound and outbound product at our 3PL warehouse is moving as it should, and being accounted correctly. We’re constantly reviewing procedures to make sure things are running as smoothly as possible. And it’s my job to make sure we’re getting our product to our customers the best we can, and doing so efficiently.

What do you find the most interesting or exciting about working at Impossible?
Since I started I’ve always been into film, and I find it exciting to be a part of keeping the medium alive. I think that, while many things going digital can provide great convenience in our lives, a wholesale transition away from all things analog would be a major loss in society. In this time when digital is still fairly new, it’s important to keep processes like this around, because I truly believe some people will come back to them once they feel a lack from having everything digital all the time. Especially in the photographic medium, there’s something irrepressible about analog that digital cannot match.

What is your personal take on analog instant photography?
When instant photography was first introduced in 1947, it changed the world. The SX-70 camera in the 70’s was like the iPhone of it’s day. It was putting together a camera and photo lab in your pocket. To get an actual image you can hold, there isn’t a better way than with instant analog film, be it a Polaroid camera or Instant Lab. I also think instant analog photography is a process that adds character to an image. Because the process is unique every time, there will always be some nuances, there’s never a carbon copy, and I love that.

What do you find the most challenging (or depressing)?
I have definitely found the progress of the film to be a challenge. I know it’s an immensely complex task though, and on top of that just getting suppliers for some of the super specialized materials it contains. I can only imagine what it’s like at the factory, in the every day of working on it. I do think the film is presently in a pretty good place, and the prospects of the Generation 2.0 films are really exciting. It really is something to think back almost five years ago, from where the first films started to where they are now, and realize just how much progress has been made.

What have been the most significant changes you have seen in the company over the past year?
I’ve definitely seen a real attempt to get the structure of the company in a good place and to get people into positions towards that end. In the US, we’ve had shifts in direction in the structure of the US branch, and things like moving warehouses twice, all to keep pace and manage our growth responsibly. I do think there will be some benefit in the more direct and streamlined communication to our EU team we now have.

Do you think there is still a high level of passion for the medium within the company?
I know there is! People are here because they love the medium. Nearly everyone here was or still is a photographer. I came here with a love and passion for cameras and the greatness of analog film and the unique attributes of instant – not as an operations or logistics person. It’s a common thread here: we all have cameras, take pictures in our spare time, talk about new films, and it never gets old when someone gets a great shot and shares it with the office.

How did the company’s recent restructuring and job losses affect you personally? Is there anything positive likely to come out of it?
The recent shift definitely came as a surprise to me. Yet I could see that, at the core of everything we do, there is the film. The recent changes are entirely driven by a need to get the film as far along as possible, and concentrating our efforts there as much as possible. It isn’t the easiest saying goodbye to some co-workers whom I’ve worked with for years, but I do believe this new direct line to EU, and really taking a unified approach to everything, whether we’re doing it in Europe or here, should help this company.

Where does the American wing of the company go now?
Right now, a big focus of ours is our Camera Refurbisment and Repair program. We’ve been moving a couple thousand cameras every month for the past several years, but we know there are millions of cameras out there, and we want to make sure anyone who wants to get their hands on a camera can do so, and have a guarantee and expectation of it working, to really enjoy our films. We are also looking to improve our distribution, making the film as widely accessible as we can within the Americas.

What do you think of the new line up of film products and the planned new camera (2015)?
I’m really excited for the next generation film. From tests I’ve seen, the speed and performance of the film is really amazing. With the cameras, they’ve been works-in-progress for the last few years, and under the new Impossible Camera team have really changed to be something I think will really stand out as unique and will give people something different to what they can get with a Polaroid camera. When the first camera is released, next year, it will really give people something to get excited about again, something that’s new in the way they can create instant analog images.

What do you hope for Impossible in the year ahead?
I really hope to see the film reach that new level and be something more accessible to a wider audience. I see it every time I take my camera out somewhere: people are surprised, excited, and interested in the camera and the idea of shooting instant film. There’s something very attractive about it and I think part of that is it’s accessibility. Once the film reaches a certain point, I think the response will be big and exciting.

No. 1136

Impossible's Analog Travelog - Lisa Toboz in Western New York

Lucile Le Doze, | Aug 13, 04:20 PM

Open Road by Lisa Toboz

Welcome back to Impossible’s Analog Travelog! In this series, we showcase fantastic Impossible photos taken on voyages the world over. This entry comes from Lisa Toboz, who recently took a trip to Western New York, USA, and brought along some Impossible film

A few weeks ago, my husband Jeff and I took a drive to Allegany, New York to visit family. Jeff and I take road trips often, exploring Pennsylvania and neighboring states to cure our travel bug when it bites. There is no place we won’t go: every small town has its secrets, and I’m usually there, camera(s) in hand, trekking through fields or along main streets, seeing what discoveries await us.

Mid-July weather is kind to us: blue skies, and cool temps – perfect for shooting instant. I vow to stop hoarding film in my fridge, and took along my SLR680 and Spectra, along with a variety of films: 600 Silver Frame, 600 Gen 2.0, and Spectra Color and Black and White.

Western New York is isolated, and frozen in time. Birthplace of the American Spirtualist movement, the area has a quiet eeriness. Abandoned buildings and old forgotten signs, no doubt, fuel my imagination. There are houses with white fences and perfect square lawns; the air is spiked with the smell of pine from surrounding forests.

Each time we visit, I am comforted to see my favorite landmarks still intact: the Motel DeSoto, still vacant, but well kept; and an abandoned antiques store in Limestone – a photographer’s dream to explore and capture on film. As Jeff peeks into the open kitchen of the abandoned house, contemplating if he should go inside, we hear some children next door tattle on us to their father, who comes over, curious to see if we’re trouble. The house is for sale, he tells us – antiques and all – and for a brief moment, our faces light up as we dream about living in a place filled with stories.

Lisa is a writer and copy editor living in the Garfield neighborhood of Pittsburgh with her husband, Jeff Schreckengost, and their cat, Lulu. Follow her on Twitter @lisatoboz, Instagram, Flickr or visit her Website!

No. 1116

Viewfinder: Laura Stevens' photos of Detroit

Lucile Le Doze, | Jul 21, 06:41 PM

by Laura Stevens

Welcome back to Viewfinder, our ongoing series in which we chronicle interesting projects that people are working on incorporating Impossible film. This entry: Laura Stevens’ photos of Detroit!

My name is Laura Stevens, I am 24 years old and I live in Paris. I studied photography at Rennes, Brittany, and I have traveled 3 times to Detroit to see my boyfriend who was living over there.

During my first trip to Detroit, it took me a few minutes to understand the city’s financial situation. I was struck by the number of abandoned houses, and they immediately symbolised for me the crisis ravaging the city for several decades.

In fact, declared bankruptcy in July 2013, Detroit is fighting with an unbelievable real estate crisis. Cradle of the automobile industry, the city has seen its population halved in sixty years. Consequences: more than 80,000 abandoned buildings, and thousands of ghosts wandering through the streets of “Motor City”.

I was fascinated by these houses. I wanted to sanctify them by capturing one unique image, because I had in front of my eyes unique houses, historically and aesthetically speaking.

So, for my second trip there, I brought my Polaroid camera 600 and a lot of Impossible films. Each shot caused me an adrenaline rush, I was terrified when I went out of my car to take pictures of these houses that seemed haunted. The advantage of this photographic process is that it’s pretty fast … Fast enough to not get spotted by zombies!

You can follow me on Facebook and on tumblr

No. 1044

Impossible Silver Shade Tour Launches at Coachella with Flaunt Magazine!

Lucile Le Doze, | Apr 23, 12:06 PM

Coachella girls enjoying the party in Silver Schade

Our Impossible Silver Shade Tour kicked off during the late night bash at the Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival hosted by Flaunt Magazine. The 1960’s custom­-designed vintage Airstream nicknamed Silver Shade, housed our photo booth and hundreds of beautiful people during the party.

In partnership with Flaunt Magazine, we had shared the Impossible mantra across the party as everyone who attended kept their images. Singer Kelis was barbecuing for everyone with her company Feast just in time for her new album Food, many cleansed their souls in the Baptismal pool, and we had special guests including Balthazar Getty, and rapper KO The Legend all in the Silver Shade photo booth.

The tour is in full swing and currently in Los Angeles. Our next stops include to Santa Barbara, San Francisco, Portland, Seattle, Salt Lake City, Las Vegas, Lollapalooza – Chicago, Philadelphia, Brooklyn, completing its journey at New York’s Photo Plus Expo 2014.

Check out images from the party! Follow the Silver Shade Tour on our website and on Twitter @ImpossibleTour.
More info on the event with Flaunt and photos here.

No. 1034

SILVER SHADE TOUR LAUNCH X FLAUNT MAGAZINE X COACHELLA

Lucile Le Doze, | Apr 11, 04:47 PM

Impossible has announced a tour across the US this summer doing demos and workshops in a custom­-designed vintage 1960’s Airstream nicknamed Silver Shade.

In partnership with Flaunt Magazine, Impossible will be launching its’ Silver Shade Tour today at Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival. From there, the Silver Shade Tour will be hitting the road to give analog enthusiasts across the country the chance to experience the Instant Lab camera as well as the creative techniques and films.

During the Flaunt Magazine event, the Impossible Airstream will be a hub of creative Impossible activity, with revelers being invited to sacrifice themselves to the ‘Chamber of Souls’: adding their Impossible portrait – and with it their soul ­to a real­time instant photography exhibition.

If you happen to be attending Coachella this year, you will have the chance to discover the newest generation of Impossible film including the innovative Impossible Gold, Silver, Black and Color Frame film, plus demo the Impossible Instant Lab firsthand.

Following Coachella, the Silver Shade Tour will continue on to Orange County, Pasadena, Los Angeles, Santa Barbara, San Francisco, Portland, Seattle, Salt Lake City, Las Vegas, Lollapalooza – Chicago, Philadelphia, Brooklyn, completing its journey at New York’s Photo Plus Expo 2014.

Follow the Silver Shade Tour on our website and on Twitter @ImpossibleTour.
More info on the event with Flaunt here.

No. 1017

Alex Holbrook: Pdexposures' Impossible Visitor

Lucile Le Doze, | Mar 20, 12:31 PM

Alex Holbrook - Global Marketing Communications Manager

Alex Holbrook is the British-born Global Marketing Communications Manager at Impossible’s creative headquarters in the heart of Berlin. Recently she was invited as a very special guest on the Pdexposures podcast.

Alex explains what Impossible is currently doing with the film line and what can be expected in future with regard to cameras and new products. She also gives an exclusive insight into the events that Impossible is planning for the rest of the year, including the Airstream tour throughout the USA.

To listen to this interesting discussion, head to Pdexposures’ website.

Learn more about Alex Holbrook through the series Impossible Interviews on our blog.

No. 983

Instant Photographer Profiles #8 - Meghan Davidson

Lucile Le Doze, | Feb 14, 10:00 AM

Meghan Davidson

Meghan Davidson lives in Lincoln, Nebraska, with her partner, Tony, and their Labrador retriever, Peter Parker. Originally from Baltimore, Maryland, she’s a psychologist who works as a faculty member at a large university. She’s also a licensed therapist, maintaining a small private practice. As she puts it, “Photography is what I do all the other hours of my days

How long have you been shooting Polaroid/Impossible film?
I’ve been shooting Polaroid/Impossible film for about four years.

What cameras do you use?
Primarily. I use the traditional folding SX-70. That was really the first Polaroid camera I used when starting to shoot instant film. It stole my heart immediately. I love everything about it – the depth of field, the ability to control the focus, the chrome and leather, the design, and on and on.

I also use the Spectra quite frequently as I adore double exposures and appreciate the wider point of view this camera provides. In the last year, I’ve bought two SLR 680s and have been really enjoying shooting with them. I like the quicker focusing capability with the auto-focus option, and still get a great depth of field similar to the SX-70. However, my arsenal of Polaroid cameras keeps growing over time. I also have two pack-film cameras that have been a bit neglected of late.

Where do you shoot most often?
Given that it’s currently winter where I live, I’ve been shooting inside my house to keep the film and cameras at a temperature they prefer. Otherwise, I most often shoot around the town where I live. However, I LOVE to travel and some of my favorite photographs come from my trips because everything feels so new and fresh and different compared to the same-ness of my daily routine and surroundings. As I had a bit of a film-hoarding problem to deal with, I’ve now shot through all of my older IMPOSSIBLE films and am now shooting the new Color 600, B&W 600, and Spectra Color films.

How would you describe your work?
My intention for my instant photography is to shoot images that convey some emotionality. I want to connect personally with the photographs that I take. That connection most often comes on an emotional level. This may be conveyed through the color or tones in the image that express a mood or feeling, the expression of a person’s face in a portrait, or the content itself which may evoke a nostalgia or timelessness. Ultimately, my hope is that the viewer connects to the photograph and feels some emotion.

In terms of inspiration, that comes in all varieties. There are times I deliberately seek out inspiration and times when it simply finds me. I’m inspired by color and shape and light. These elements are around me daily, I just have to pay attention (sometimes that can be a challenge with all the other parts of life tugging at me). I’m very inspired by decades past – particularly the 50s, 60s, and 70s – so any time I see old signs, typography, clothing, films, or hear music from those eras, I feel inspired and want to somehow translate that into a photograph. And then there are times when I truly seek out inspiration, often turning to other art forms including paintings and sculpture. I’ve had many photography ideas come to me when I’m waiting in line somewhere, driving, or attending an event. Seems like idle time, observing what’s around me, and letting my mind wander allow for inspiration to flow.

Tell us a little about the four works you have chosen as your favourites?
Choosing just four favorites proved a challenging task!
1. The first photograph is incredibly meaningful to me for a number of reasons. It’s the first self-portrait I ever took with my SX-70 camera. I love the depth of field of the SX-70, so I fell in love with self-portraiture with the SX-70 from this photo. It also holds a special place for me because it was chosen by the folks at the NYC Impossible Project space to enlarge and exhibit in the Out of the Blue show.
2. This photo of my friend, Sarah, represents the fun and whimsy that I want to feel more of in my daily life. I adore color and was so happy with how brilliant the reds and purples came through in this photo. I also like that we’re unsure when this photo was taken given the timelessness of the Converse sneakers and no other dated information in the frame.
3. The photo of a beautiful woman (inside and out) whom I met at a retreat makes me so happy. I love the vibe of this photo – the tones, the shadow, the bikini. It feels very 70s to me and I adore that.
4. The photo of the apron really conveys a great deal of who I am as a photographer. It shows my love of nostalgia, timelessness, vintage things, and quiet moments.

Do you have any helpful creative techniques or advice you would like to share?
For someone just beginning to shoot instant film, I’d love to tell them to “stay with it and be patient.” I’ve learned that it takes time to really get to know the variety of different films out there, so I’d encourage others to be gentle with themselves and that process.

It also takes time to get to know the specific camera(s) with which you are shooting. For example, some cameras may tend to overexpose or underexpose the newer Impossible films, but you only learn this about a particular camera by working with it (as I’m doing right now with a new-to-me SX-70 Sonar). Sometimes with the older folding SX-70s and the SLR 680s, the mirrors inside may have moved a bit out of place over time. This translates into a mismatch between what you see in the viewfinder and the photo that results. You have to practice, shoot a ton, and learn each of your cameras to make adjustments like these. But if you hang in there, you will “get it” and you will fall in love with instant photography.

Do you have any upcoming exhibitions/publications?
Last year was a tremendous year for me regarding exhibitions and publications. As I said above, one of my IMPOSSIBLE photographs was enlarged and exhibited at the NYC Impossible Project space for the Out of the Blue exhibit. Additionally, I had four publications featuring my photography and writing in UPPERCASE, Artful Blogging, and Mingle magazines. My photography was also featured in the crowd-sourced book, This Is Happening, from Chronicle Books.

This year, I hope to secure a publisher for a memoir and photography book based on my current project, ’365 Impossible Self-Portraits.’ I would also love the opportunity to exhibit a selection of these self-portraits at the NYC Impossible Project space.

Who are your favourite photographers, living or dead?
Oh the list of favorite photographers is so long and ever-growing! I admire and have learned from the work of greats including Diane Arbus, Francesca Woodman, Dorothea Lange, and Imogen Cunningham. I’m also enchanted by Vivian Maier. In addition to these historic photographers, I truly admire the work of many fellow shooters in the instant film community. I’m constantly blown away and inspired by the photography I see in the Flickr pools associated with the Impossible Project.

What are you hoping for from Impossible during the next year?
In this coming year, I’m hoping for new Impossible film to test and try out. I’m also hoping that with all the advances the Impossible team is making with the films, that one of those will include faster development time for the photos.

Discover Meghan’s photos on her website, on Flickr and follow her on Twitter @meghandavidson

No. 964

Instant Photographer Profiles #2: Sarah Elise Abramson

Lucile Le Doze | Jan 24, 11:27 AM

Sarah Elise Abramson

Sarah Elise Abramson lives “in a sea-foam-green house with my girlfriend, two kitties, and a leopard tortoise in San Pedro, California”.

How long have you been shooting Polaroid/Impossible film?
Since I was in high school. I would take portraits of all my friends. It wasn’t until college that I started looking at it as a useful medium.

What cameras do you use? And on what films?
I almost always go for the Polaroid SX-70 camera over any other Polaroid camera. I enjoy having the freedom of selective focus. I’m partial to the PX-70 Impossible film but when I can I’ll shoot with Time Zero film, but this is getting exceedingly harder to come across.

Where do you shoot most often?
I shoot all over but if I had to narrow it down I probably do most of my shooting in San Pedro. It’s a very odd little town. Angels Gate and Fort MacArthur are definitely some of my favorite places to explore and shoot. I also enjoy knocking on strangers’ doors. Many good stories have come about that way.

How would you describe your work?
Describing my work is hard for me. I feel the most vulnerable when I do. But here’s my best shot. In life and in the Polaroid series I recently finished called, “The Things That Live In The Middle” I noticed a few things. I’m attracted to the small size of the Polaroid itself. I aim to create images that are complex and intimate and leave you with a sense of magic that’s in every day life, if you’re open to it. It’s like when you look at a town or a city from an aerial view or an old, intricate dollhouse; each small space filled with it’s necessary components.

What inspires you?
The things I shoot usually have an element of distortion or ambiguity. Heterotopia is a concept elaborated by the philosopher Michel Foucault that deals with the idea of “otherness”. These are things that are neither here nor there and hypothetically could be anywhere or nowhere. The inability to definitively place where all of the photos in this series were taken lends them the ability to receive meaning projected on to them and their surreality holds that element of magic or the unknown.

Tell us a little about the four works you have chosen as your favourites?
These four Polaroids are all from the series, The Things That Live In The Middle. All the models I used for the series are my friends. Not only would this project be unrealized if it weren’t for my friends allowing me to strip them down and shoot them in public places, but because of the connections between myself and each model, the emotion felt in every portrait feels comfortable and genuine. So I owe them a lot :)

Do you have any helpful creative techniques or advice you would like to share?
I occasionally exchange emails with one of my favorite photographers, Susan Worsham. In one of her early emails she told me that as a photographer, our most important job is to inspire. It’s simple advice but for whatever reason it resonated a lot with me.

Do you have any upcoming exhibitions/publications?
The Things That Live In The Middle will be available for purchase as a Polaroid coffee table book on the Blurb website in about a week. I also recently finished the very first issue of Slow Toast. It’s a ninety page art zine featuring eighteen different artists ranging from photographer, painter, and professional skater, Ed Templeton to Kira Roessler, who has her dog Tim interview her about playing bass is Black Flag. Slow Toast goes to print within the month and will be sold in selected bookstores throughout the Los Angeles area. You can also email SlowToastMagazine@gmail.com for distribution inquiries or to order a copy.
Also, I will be showing in San Francisco on Feb. 14th through the 16th at On The Edge 4, an erotica photography exhibition at SOMarts Cultural Center.

Who are your favourite photographers, living or dead?
My favorite photographers are as follows, in no particular order: Francesca Woodman, Ana Mendieta, Susan Worsham, Ahndraya Parlato, Helmut Newton, and Manuel Alvarez Bravo.

What are you hoping for from Impossible during the next year?
I don’t know if I’m hoping for anything in specific from Impossible this year. Just keep doing what your doing and allowing people to still be able to enjoy and experience the irreplaceable magic that is synonymous with instant film.

Visit Sarah’s website and find her on Instagram @slowtoast!

Discover all our Instant Photographer Profiles here!

No. 962

Instant Photographer Profiles #1 - Patrick Winfield

Lucile Le Doze, | Jan 21, 10:30 AM

Patrick Winfield

The first in a regular series in which we ask our favourite Impossible instant photographers to answer short questions about the medium and their work. We begin with New York-based art director, Patrick Winfield.

How long have you been shooting Polaroid/Impossible film?
Since 2000 for Polaroid. And since Impossible started making film.

What cameras do you use?
The SX70 is my go-to camera. I also utilize the Macro and Spectra for closeup work, and a basic 600 for photograms.

Where do you shoot most often?
I shoot out in the field and in the studio, mostly on SX70 color and Spectra films.

How would you describe your work?
I would say my work is about seeing, fragmented yet focused. I am interested in the way the eye moves around the final image and picks up on objects in the peripheral, allowing the mind to ‘fill in the gaps’ for the other elements. There is a pushing and pulling of the viewers eye. One image can be just as interesting or appealing as the whole. Everything inspires me. The good and the bad.

Tell us a little about the four works you have chosen to show us.
These are all pieces that I continue to look at and help push the work coming next. That, to me, makes them strong.

Do you have any helpful creative techniques or advice you would like to share?
A great idea will trump all the gear in the world. Also, shoot and create what you want to see.

Do you have any upcoming exhibitions/publications?
I just showed at The Impossible Project Space in New York.

Who are your favourite photographers?
So many. The short list: Hockney, Lucas Samaras, Sally Mann, László Moholy-Nagy.

What are you hoping for from Impossible during the next year?
A collaboration on a huge project involving my work and a large-scale composite.

No. 451

Impossible's 600 Camera Workshop Returns!

Patrick Tobin, | Jun 4, 08:41 PM

Sunday, June 10th, 2012
10:00 AM to 1:00 PM
Impossible Project Space
425 Broadway
5th Floor
New York
NY 10013
Photo by James Matthew Carroll

Continuing our Impossible Workshop series, we are pleased to announce the return of a classic workshop on one of our favorite cameras, the Polaroid 600 camera. The Impossible Project will hold a three hour interactive workshop on maximizing Impossible film in the Polaroid 600 Camera.

In the workshop, participants will be guided through the ins and outs of the Polaroid 600 series camera with a knowledgeable Impossible expert staffer. Workshop participants will learn introductory and intermediate techniques to master their 600 camera including exposure and functionality. The workshop will include an in depth overview of shooting Impossible Project film including light shielding, temperature control and image preservation.

Workshop participants will be led on an interactive photo walk with one of Impossible’s experienced staff photographers, capturing the photogenic charm of downtown New York as they explore SOHO, Chinatown and Little Italy. The group will then reconvene back at the space to review images, ask questions and talk about image storage and preservation.

Fee is $50 (price includes 1 pack PX 680 Color Shade COOL film & Frog Tongue)

To register, please call (212) 219 3254 or email nycspace@theimpossibleproject.com
Please notify when registering if you’d like to borrow a camera at no extra cost.

No. 435

Analog Feedback Night is Back!

Jon Campolo | May 24, 11:00 AM

THURSDAY, MAY 31, 2012
6:00 PM to 9:00 PM
The Impossible Project NYC Space

Let’s talk about PX, baby!

Tackling the Impossible takes time, dedication and expertise − and we can all get by with a little help from our friends. Come join in on the ever-growing Impossible community for our next monthly Analog Feedback Night.

Next Thursday, May 31st, come by the NYC Space to show off your work. Talk film and photography with like minded instant enthusiasts over a few beers. Discover new camera and film secrets, geek out and maybe even get your work featured on The Impossible Blog – this is your chance to connect with other artists and photographers involved in the instant film community!

WHEN: THURSDAY, MAY 31, 2012 6:00 PM to 9:00 PM
WHERE: Impossible Project Space NYC 425 Broadway, 5th Floor Between Howard & Canal Streets
RSVP: Email rsvp@theimpossibleproject.com or call +1 212 219 3254
FREE and open to the public!

No. 427

VARIAL & NADJARI ARTIST TALK @ THE NYC SPACE

Jon Campolo | May 17, 05:27 PM

THURSDAY, MAY 24, 2012
6:00 PM to 8:00 PM
The Impossible Project NYC Space

To celebrate the recent opening of Traces of Time, the vibrant new exhibition to open on our South wall, photographers and fellow travelers Varial and Fabrice Nadjari will visit the NYC Space to talk about their experience shooting Impossible film in the remote deserts and villages of the Wakhan corridor, Afghanistan. Guests will have the opportunity to ask the artists about their shooting and survival techniques and hear the inside story on their adventure. If you haven’t had a chance to see this unique exhibition, Traces of Time will be showing in the NYC Space until June 1st.

While you prepare your burning questions for the artists, check out their story on The New York Times LENS blog or listen to their interview on NPR!

WHEN: THURSDAY, MAY 24, 2012 from 6:00 PM to 8:00 PM
WHERE: Impossible Project Space NYC 425 Broadway, 5th Floor Between Howard & Canal Streets
RSVP: Email rsvp@theimpossibleproject.com or call +1 212 219 3254
FREE and open to the public!

No. 422

MAURIZIO GALIMBERTI ARTIST TALK & WORKSHOP RECAP!

Jon Campolo | May 15, 12:27 AM

Last weekend we were lucky enough to host TWO special events with Italian maestro and analog instant master photographer Maurzio Galimberti at the NYC Space.

During his visit to New York, Maurizio shared his experiences and thoughts on the instant analog medium and on his transition from Polaroid to Impossible films. Some lucky guests were selected as subjects for some of his unique instant mosaic work, and the Impossible team was there to capture a video of the action.

To send him off in style, The NYC Space will host one final event with Maurizio, a farewell pizza party and documentary screening!

Come by The Impossible Project NYC Space on Tuesday the 22nd of May for a one time screening of a wonderful documentary on the photographic life of Maurizio Galimberti. If you missed the chance to meet him earlier this month, now’s your chance to eat pizza and drink some beers with Maurizio himself at this informal event.

MAURIZIO GALIMBERTI DOCUMENTARY & PIZZA PARTY!

WHEN: TUESDAY, MAY 22ND, 2012 from 7:00 PM to 9:00 PM
WHERE: Impossible Project NYC Space, 425 Broadway, 5th Floor Between Howard & Canal Street
FREE and open to the public!

No. 415

SX-70 WORKSHOP @ THE NYC SPACE

Jon Campolo | May 10, 08:27 PM

SUNDAY, May 20, 2012
10:00 AM to 1:00 PM
The Impossible Project NYC Space
Photo by Kisha Bari

Master an Iconic Tool in the History of Analog Photography!

The Impossible Project NYC Space is excited to welcome back a classic workshop on the most celebrated of Polaroid cameras, the SX-70. On Sunday, May 20th, the Impossible team will host a three hour interactive workshop on maximizing Impossible film in the Polaroid SX-70 Camera. Our introductory workshops are designed to give you the confidence you need to let your imagination run wild! We’ll discuss the features of the SX-70 camera and focus on shooting techniques to ensure you achieve the best results out of the newest Impossible films available.

You’ll be guided through the ins and outs of the Polaroid SX-70 series with a knowledgeable Impossible expert staffer and learn techniques including exposure, functionality, light shielding, temperature control and about available accessories.

We’ll then lead you on an interactive photo walk with one of Impossible’s experienced staff photographers, capturing the photogenic charm of downtown New York as they explore SOHO, Chinatown, and Little Italy. The group will then reconvene back at the space to review images, ask questions and talk about image storage and preservation.

Contact us and register for your chance to master an iconic tool in the history of photography!

WHEN: SUNDAY, May 20, 2012, 10:00 AM to 1:00 PM
WHERE: Impossible Project Space, 425 Broadway, Floor 5, NYC 10013
REGISTRATION: Call (212) 219 3254 or nycspace@theimpossibleproject.com
Please notify when registering if renting a camera at no extra cost.
FEE: $50 (price includes 1 pack PX 70 Color Shade COOL & PX Shade)

No. 414

TRACES OF TIME - OPENING RECEPTION RECAP

Jon Campolo | May 10, 08:21 PM

Last Thursday we celebrated the opening of our latest exhibition, Traces of Time, at the NYC Space. The show consists of images taken by photographers and fellow travelers Varial and Fabrice Nadjari along their travels in the deserts and villages of Afghanistan.

Guests enjoyed the vibrant showcase of Impossible films alongside a video presentation of the artists’ journey. DJ Rodolphe filled the room with vinyl music, refreshments were generously provided by Brooklyn Brewery and Impossible photographers captured the night on the new PX100 COOL film.

Thank you to all who attended, and congratulations to the artists. Traces of Time will be on display at the Impossible Project NYC Space during regular open hours: Monday through Friday 11am–7pm and on Weekends 12pm–6pm until June 3rd. Don’t miss your chance to see it!

No. 403

ANALOG FEEDBACK NIGHT RECAP

Jon Campolo | May 3, 09:00 PM

Photo by Adam Custins

Last week at the NYC Space we had our first ever Analog Feedback Night. Impossible photographers and enthusiasts gathered to discuss their images in an informal open table discussion. The night was a warm gathering of like minded individuals and an excellent way for people to meet other passionate Impossible photographers. We discussed shooting methods, differences in film types, and the advantages and disadvantages of shooting analog instant film in various settings. Adam Custins came in with his portfolio and talked about how he integrates instant film into his commercial work. Dave Knapik was preparing for an art exhibition (up now!) and requested input about framing and presentation methods. We also had some great imagery shown by Josie Keefe, Patrick Tobin and Wendy Strauss.

Analog Feedback Night will be a reoccurring event at our space. If you miss those art school class critiques or just want to discuss other people’s work while getting feedback on your own, come to the next Analog Feedback night on May 31st!

No. 397

Upcoming Events @ The NYC Space - MAY 2012

Jon Campolo | Apr 30, 11:16 PM

As The Impossible Project NYC Space gears up for another busy month, we invite you to all of the following events! This Thursday come celebrate the imaginative approach of Impossible explorers Varial and Fabrice Nadjari with the opening of Traces of Time, then follow up on their adventure at their Artist Talk later in the month. Don’t miss the rare and special duo of events with Italian maestro Maurizio Galimberti, and practice honing your skills with a classic camera at our upcoming SX-70 Workshop. Come and experience these very special events for yourself, or bring some friends to everything happening this month at the NYC Space!

Traces of Time
Thursday, May 3rd, 2012
Opening Reception 6-9PM
Featured in NY Times’ LENS Blog and on NPR, Varial & Nadjari present their incredible collection of Impossible instant portraits from their timeless travels through Kash Goz, Afganistan, alongside a video installation.
More info here

Maurizio Galimberti Meet & Greet
Saturday, May 5th, 2012
6-8PM
Hear directly from a master of instant manipulation and collage at this intimate event. Maurizio will share experiences and thoughts on the analog instant medium and his transition from Polaroid to Impossible films.
More info here

Maurizio Galimberti Techniques Workshop
Saturday, May 6th, 2012
10AM-1PM
World renowned photographer Maurizio Galimerti will teach his signature manipulation and collage techniques at this unique workshop. Be part of a rare opportunity to learn from one of the instant film greats!
More info here

SX-70 Workshop
Saturday, May 20th, 2012
10AM-1PM
This fully interactive workshop will explore the features of the SX-70 camera, while focusing on shooting techniques and achieving the best out of the Impossible Project film range.
More info here

Work In Progress
Ongoing through May 3rd, 2012
From the vaults of Impossible history we are showcasing originals from the experts: our talented and knowledgeable staff. Many members have seen every variation and test version of all twelve distinct batches of film!
More info here

Momentum
Ongoing through late June, 2012
Celebrating how far we’ve come, twelve carefully selected photographers illustrate a MOMENTUM that will carry analog instant photography through the digital age and beyond.
More info here

No. 392

MAURIZIO GALIMBERTI ARTIST TALK & WORKSHOP @ THE NYC SPACE

Jon Campolo | Apr 26, 10:31 PM

Saturday & Sunday, May 5 & 6
Sat 6-8PM & Sun 10AM-1PM
The Impossible Project NYC Space

Italian photographer Maurizio Galimberti has been working with Polaroid film since the early 90s, but has now adapted his techniques to incorporate new Impossible film materials. Maurizio uses instant photographs to create stunning multi dimensional mosaics, consisting of up to 140 individual images, capturing personalities like Johnny Depp, George Clooney and Sofia Coppola among many others.

The Impossible Project NYC Space is proud to offer TWO special events lead by Maurizio Galimberti in early May. During his very special visit to New York, Maurizio will share his experiences and thoughts on the instant analog medium and on the transition from Polaroid to Impossible films. Participants in this very rare workshop will have the opportunity to ask Maurizio all their artistic and technical questions, and also get an exclusive look into his signature techniques and observations using Impossible films.

Don’t miss this rare opportunity to learn from a master of instant photography, and RSVP today!

Maurizio Galimberti Meet & Greet

WHEN: Saturday, May 5 from 6PM to 8PM
WHERE: Impossible Project Space NYC 425 Broadway, 5th Floor between Howard & Canal Streets
REGISTRATION: Email nycspace@theimpossibleproject.com or call +1 212 219 3254
FREE and open to the public!

Maurizio Galimberti’s Techniques Workshop

WHEN: Sunday, May 6 from 10AM to 1PM
WHERE: Impossible Project Space NYC 425 Broadway, 5th Floor between Howard & Canal Streets
REGISTRATION: Email nycspace@theimpossibleproject.com or call +1 212 219 3254
FEE: $199.99 (price includes all film and tools necessary for the workshop)

No. 386

Traces of Time @ The Impossible Project NYC Space

Jon Campolo | Apr 23, 08:59 PM

THURSDAY MAY 3RD, 2012
6PM-9PM
The Impossible Project NYC Space
Photo by Varial & Nadjari

A Photographic Journey with the Afghan Pamiris

During July and August 2011, childhood friends and photographers Varial and Fabrice Nadjari traveled by foot to the North-Eastern part of Afghanistan armed with Polaroid cameras, Impossible films and solar powered scanners.

In the remote village of Kash Goz, they photographed mischievous Ismaili children, housewives, opium smokers, village chiefs and peasants. Each subject received their own portrait as a gift from the artists.

These portraits are what makes up “Traces of Time,” opening at The Impossible Project Space NYC alongside a video presentation of the artists’ journey from May 3 to June 3 2012 and on www.the-impossible-project.com. The opening reception will take place in presence of the artists with DJs and refreshments.

For more information about the artists’ experience, check out the story on The New York Times LENS blog or listen to their interview on NPR!

WHEN: THURSDAY MAY 3RD, 2012, 6PM-9PM
WHERE: Impossible Project NYC Space, 425 Broadway, Floor 5, NYC 10013
RSVP: rsvp@theimpossibleproject.com or call (212) 219-3254
OPEN HOURS: Mon–Fri 11am–7pm and Weekends 12pm–6pm
For further information, please visit the exhibition site.

No. 383

MORE LOVE FROM ACE HOTEL!

Jon Campolo, | Apr 22, 11:00 AM

Photo by Jessica Reinhardt

Alongside our exhibition with ACE Hotels in NYC and our Limited Edition PX 600 Silver Shade UV+ film, ACE has been hosting an online photo contest, selecting new winners every month! ACE is collecting submissions of YOUR Impossible images in an ever-growing gallery located online at acehotel.com/impossible. ACE’s panel of romantics and analog enthusiasts will curate a physical gallery show at Ace Hotel New York this Fall, exhibiting selected shots from the contest.

Congratulations to Jessica Reinhardt, Jason Benning and Demian Jacob Mendes – the most recent selected photographers of the ACE contest!

Check out ACE’s gallery and pick your favorite images or submit your own for a chance to win and be featured. Good luck!

No. 378

Analog Feedback Night @ The NYC Space

Jon Campolo, | Apr 19, 06:04 PM

Thursday, April 26, 2012
6:00 PM to 9:00 PM
The Impossible Project NYC Space

Let’s talk about PX, baby!

Tackling the Impossible takes time, dedication and expertise − and we can all get by with a little help from our friends. Come join in on the ever-growing Impossible community for our first ever Analog Feedback Night.

On April 26th, The Impossible Project NYC Space invites YOU to showcase your favorite Impossible images to knowledgeable peers and fellow enthusiasts. Spend the evening reviewing your work and getting feedback while making new analog-loving friends. This is your chance to connect with other artists and photographers involved in the instant film community!

The night will take place from 6-9pm in The Impossible Project NYC Space. Come with originals or digital files on a USB flash drive. Bring your friends!

When: Thursday, April 26, 2012, 6:00 PM to 9:00 PM
Where: Impossible Project Space, 425 Broadway, Floor 5, NYC 10013
Registration: (212) 219 3254 or nycspace@theimpossibleproject.com
FREE and open to the public

No. 373

ARTIST IN RESIDENCE: MOMENTUM'S BRIAN HENRY

Jon Campolo, | Apr 16, 07:41 PM

Photo by Brian Henry

MOMENTUM is currently on view at The Impossible Project NYC Space. This stunning exhibition of PX100 UV+ and PX70 materials includes some of the richest tones and sharpest contrast yet. For this installment of Artist in Residence, surrealist photographer Brian Henry has shared his experiences shooting these new batches of film, as well as his interpretation of the exhibition’s concept. Through a happy accident involving a faulty heater in a freezing basement and explorations in an abandoned hospital, Brian provides insight into his creative process and how unpredictable chance influenced the final images he submitted for MOMENTUM:

“My thought process began taking the theme ‘Momentum’ in a literal sense. I set up in my small studio space which is a small, strange storage room under my porch in the basement. It was freezing that week, so I decided to set up a heater among my landlord’s bookshelves stacked with high school memory books, fur coats and religious paintings. My eyesight is horrible which makes self-portraiture even more difficult, let alone working in a cluttered space. I tried to recreate some forceful waves of movement by setting up a series of moving wire arrangements and sculptures. I had myself wrapped in wire, partially blind, when the power went out due to the heater I was using. There I was in the dark basement, wrapped in wires, trying to find the breaker. Somehow I managed to get caught on a large bag of coat hangers my landlord is hoarding, and all I could do was tiptoe slowly with my eyes closed to prevent myself from poking my eyes out. Done. Later that day I decided to portray the momentum theme in a more symbolic and spiritual way. My cloaked ghost sending this force through the walls of an abandoned tuberculosis hospital. Bones freezing from the cold wind and doors slamming down the hall. I found it more difficult shooting the color shade film in the field. I am use to overexposing when working in abandoned spaces and letting the light bleed in, but it wasn’t working as I had hoped. Also, the film took a really long time to develop, even though it processed in my warm pocket, the full images did not show up until we had left the hospital. Of course then I see everything I wasn’t happy with and wish I could have done better. I must say however, that the tones of the Color Shade film are spectacular! Finally a bit of relief for those who had become attached to Polaroid’s Time-Zero film that was discontinued in 2006. I am extremely excited for the future of instant film and look forward to mastering the quirks of these odd films. If you have a chance, I encourage you to see the exhibit itself. The originals that are on display are amazing – the Silver Shade films appear semi-metallic and should really be admired in person, not only on a computer screen!”

To see more of Brian’s work, please visit his official website and Flickr photostream. Special thanks to Brian for sharing his story – stay tuned for the next installment of Artist in Residence!

No. 359

Spectra Workshop @ The Impossible Project NYC Space

Jon Campolo, | Apr 5, 04:40 PM

Sunday, April 15TH 2012
10AM - 1PM
The Impossible Project NYC Space
425 Broadway
Floor 5
New York
NY 10013

UPDATEWORKSHOP HAS BEEN CANCELLED! We apologize for any inconvenience.

Spring into the Magic of Spectra!

Continuing our Impossible Workshop series, we are pleased to announce the return of a classic workshop on one of our favorite cameras, the Spectra. The Impossible Project will hold a three hour interactive workshop on maximizing Impossible film in the Polaroid Spectra Camera.

In the workshop, participants will be guided through the ins and outs of the Polaroid Spectra series camera with a knowledgeable Impossible expert staffer. Workshop participants will learn introductory and intermediate techniques to master their Spectra camera including exposure, functionality, and accessories. The workshop will include an in depth overview of shooting Impossible Project film including light shielding and temperature control.

Workshop participants will be lead on an interactive photo walk with one of Impossible’s experienced staff photographers, capturing the photogenic charm of downtown New York as they explore SOHO, Chinatown, and Little Italy. The group will then reconvene back at the space to review images, ask questions and talk about image storage and preservation.

When: SUNDAY, APRIL 15, 2012, 10:00 AM to 1:00 PM
Where: Impossible Project Space, 425 Broadway, Floor 5, NYC 10013
Registration: (212) 219 3254 or nycspace@theimpossibleproject.com
Please notify when registering if renting a camera at no extra cost
Fee: $50 (price includes 1 pack PZ 680 Color Shade FF & Frog Tongue)

No. 355

NYC SPACE UPCOMING EVENTS - APRIL 2012

Jon Campolo, | Apr 3, 12:24 AM

Ongoing Exhibition MOMENTUM
1st of March – 26th of June 2012
A 200 square foot show of our
best and brightest new films for the
SX-70 camera. PX-70 & PX 100 UV+
images by a group of our select US
photographers.

For more info please visit:
http://www.the-impossible-project.com/projects/exhibitions/momentum

Ongoing Exhibition WORK IN PROGRESS
29th of March – 1st of May 2012
A large part of what makes Impossible so
special is it’s dedicated, creative and
analog obsessed staff.
With an intimate knowledge of these
sometimes unpredictable materials,
the Impossible team members have
become masters of the unknown.

For more info please visit:
http://www.the-impossible-project.com/projects/exhibitions/workinprogress

SPECTRA WORKSHOP
UPDATEWORKSHOP CANCELLED!
We apologize for any inconvenience.
Sunday 15th of April – 10am to 1pm
A three hour interactive workshop on
maximizing Impossible film in Polaroid
Spectra Cameras.

To Register please call +1 212 219 3254

CHLOE AFTEL’S NUDE WORKSHOP
UPDATEWORKSHOP RESCHEDULED TO MAY 27TH 9AM-12PM
We apologize for any inconvenience.
Acclaimed photographer Chloe Aftel
reveals her professional techniques
on shooting nude models with
Impossible Film.

To Register please call +1 212 219 3254

ANALOG FEEDBACK
Thursday 26th of April – 6pm to 9pm
A NEW monthly evening for Instant
Photography enthusiasts can share
their latest work on Impossible film
and talk about photographic techniques,
film & camera types and trouble shooting.

No. 354

WORK IN PROGRESS RECAP!

Jon Campolo, | Apr 2, 11:59 PM

Last Thursday, The Impossible Project Space NYC celebrated the opening of its first ever group staff show WORK IN PROGRESS. The exhibition showcased work by our dedicated, creative and analog obsessed staff as well as how far Impossible has come since its very first test batches and beta films. Guests experienced the entire spectrum of Impossible materials produced within the last two years, while our staff captured the event on digital and PX100UV+ with the new Mint Flash Bar. Everyone enjoyed live vinyl music, refreshments and the company of friends and fellow enthusiasts.

Thank you to all who attended, and congratulations to the artists! WORK IN PROGRESS will be on display at the Impossible Project NYC Space during regular open hours: Monday through Friday 11am–7pm and on Weekends 12pm–5pm until May 8th. Don’t miss your chance to see it!

No. 348

MANIPULATIONS WORKSHOP RECAP!

Jon Campolo | Mar 29, 07:55 PM

For the more adventurous of analog enthusiasts, The Impossible Project NYC space held its first ever Manipulations Workshop last Sunday March 26th.
Workshop coordinator Kisha Bari presented a brief history on various manipulation techniques before delving into the wonders of Impossible integral film manipulation, negative bleaching and emulsion lifts. Working with all kinds of Impossible film types, the attending photographers could have stayed all day creating brilliant works of art using all three techniques. 
Check out the photos from Sunday’s Manipulation Crafternoon, and keep an eye out for more workshops at the NYC Space every month!

No. 337

Artist in Residence: Instant Revolution's Jennifer Juniper Stratford

Jon Campolo, | Mar 22, 11:00 AM

Although we’ve almost reached the close of Instant Revolution at The Impossible Project NYC Space, Jennifer Juniper Stratford has graciously shared the concept behind her work included in the show for our next installment of Artist in Residence. Through photographing Hollywood with Polaroid Classic Image film, she provides insight into the Polaroid camera’s relationship with movie making and its participants, ultimately reflecting on how a classic medium once influenced an industry:

“These days the use of analog is often misunderstood as being something that is nostalgic, meant to look old, or is reactionary to digital. In a larger scope it should be viewed as a choice of medium like any other and is not on the verge of becoming extinct in the face of digital.

When I was approached by the Impossible Project to create work for the Instant Revolution project, I was very excited because I had been paying to attention to many of the things they were doing with analog photography. The minute I laid my eyes on the spectra camera I knew exactly what I wanted to do with it.

Polaroid was once one of the most essential tools used on a movie set. It was used for casting, continuity, costuming and for capturing memories in between takes. Unlike the movies, Polaroids are often casual and have their own set of loose photographic rules.

I set out with my Spectra camera to photograph disappearing Hollywood – people who have made significant works but have since fallen out of the limelight. I photographed actors, directors, special effects artists and even editors whom I admire to make a record of their contributions to the movies.

Using this medium again brought back all the feelings I had when I first fell in love with photography. How much care you have to take using the film, all the little tricks and how precious every frame is helped to solidify many of my reasons for choosing to use analog.

For the most part, everyone was willing and honored to be photographed. Most of them invited me to their home. When I showed up holding the Spectra, they instantly bonded with the camera because it reminded them of being on the set. They all had a bit of a giggle and love for the Polaroid, which made this project so significant to the history of Hollywood and it’s relationship with the Polaroid.

I was raised in Hollywood. Although I was never a part of showbiz, I grew up alongside it. As a teenager my mother allowed me to watch cable, even all night long if I wanted to as a teenager, and often I closed my eyes after 4am. My love of the movies is the core of my work as a photographer.

As mainstream cinema focuses its attention on the latest CGI accomplishments and the production of remakes, I felt it was important to remember the individuals who paved the yellow brick road. So I set out with my Polaroid camera to photograph and interview disappearing Hollywood, the version that matters most to me—the directors, actors, special effects artists, producers, even composers who’ve had great influence but have since fallen under the radar. This is a record and a reminder of the true soul of the movies.”

To see more of Jennifer’s work, keep up with her column “Off Hollywood” on VICE.com. Special thanks to Jennifer for sharing her thoughts – stay tuned for the next installment of Artist in Residence!

No. 330

Manipulations Workshop @ The NYC Space

Jon Campolo | Mar 15, 04:58 PM

MAR 25, 2012
10AM - 1PM
The Impossible Project Space NYC
425 Broadway
Floor 5
New York
NY 10013
Emulsion Lift

Announcing a brand new addition to the ever-growing Impossible Workshop Series! On March 25th, 2012, The Impossible Project Space NYC will host its first workshop on alternative techniques in analog instant image making. The workshop will cover three techniques: image manipulation, emulsion lifts and negative bleaching. These classic procedures are revived by Impossible materials, revitalizing techniques that have been lost with the extinction of certain film types. These techniques will give you the freedom to play with your images, allowing you to expand your skill set to create distinctive works of art through experimentation. Participants can expect to work in a small group with an expert Impossible team member to learn and create together!

When: Sunday, March 25, 2012, 10am to 1pm
Where: Impossible Project Space NYC
Registration: (212) 219 3254
or nycspace@the-impossible-project.com 
Fee: $75 (includes 1 pack PX 680 Color Shade and all tools necessary for workshop)

No. 320

MOMENTUM Recap!

Jon Campolo, | Mar 8, 10:46 PM

Photo by Patrick Tobin

Just last week, The Impossible Project Space NYC celebrated the opening of MOMENTUM. The exhibition showcased just how far Impossible has come since starting production, highlighting new PX100 UV+ Silver Shade and PX70 Color Shade films. Attendees took in the many shades of new Impossible materials, while our very own Patrick Tobin captured the action on PX70 with the new Mint Flash Bar. Everyone enjoyed live vinyl music and the company of friends and enthusiasts.

As a special treat, Impossible staffer Josie Keefe has compiled a time lapse of MOMENTUM’s installation, to show how much hard work goes into our exhibitions in order make sure attendees are instantly gratified!

Thank you to all who attended, and congratulations to the artists. MOMENTUM will be on display at the Impossible Project NYC Space during regular open hours: Monday through Friday 11am–7pm and on Weekends 12pm–5pm until June 26th. Don’t miss your chance to see it!

No. 316

Meet the Impossible Photographer

Frank Love | Mar 6, 09:55 AM

MAR 16, MAR 31, MAY 2012
Barcelona, Rome, NYC
Maurizio Galimberti @ Meet the Impossible Photographer, 3 March 2012, Vienna, Austria. Photo by Eva Mühlbacher

We are excited to present and invite you to a new global Impossible talks series: Meet the Impossible Photographer introduces you to inspiring contemporary photographers passionate about working with Impossible film. These unique meet and greet sessions will allow you to directly learn from professionals, and the photographers will be on hand for an in-person Q&A – ask them all your Impossible questions and get a glimpse behind their work and experiences!

Maurizio Galimberti held the first of our upcoming Meet the Impossible Photographer events last Saturday, March 3 in Vienna. You have the chance to join this inspiring session on the following dates:

16 MARCH
@ Impossible Partner Store Barcelona ->click for details

31 MARCH
@ Impossible Booth at Photoshow Rome -> click for details

MAY (tba)
@ Impossible Project Space NYC (tba)

About Maurizio Galimberti

Maurizio Galimberti is known worldwide for his impressive mosaics, created with a rigorous technique on up to 140 Polaroid and since two years Impossible images. For his unique portraits Maurizio Galimberti has been shooting personalities such as Johnny Depp, George Clooney or Sofia Coppola among many others. With his unique technique he creates mathematical, yet entirely musical, portraits of people and places. His work has been exhibited in galleries around the world.

Since the early 90s Maurizoi Galimberti has mostly been working with Polaroid film, since 2012 Maurizio Galimberti is a dedicated Impossible photographer

No. 315

600 Workshop @ The Impossible Project NYC Space

Jon Campolo, | Mar 5, 11:19 PM

March 11 2012
10AM - 1PM
The Impossible Project Space NYC

Perfecting Impossible Techniques with a Classic Camera!

Back by popular demand, The Impossible Project is pleased to announce the return of The 600 Workshop at the NYC Space! On Sunday, March 11, the Impossible team will hold a three-hour interactive tutorial on getting the best out of the classic Polaroid 600 camera and Impossible’s film range. The workshop is designed to explore the full potential and versatility of any 600 series camera, including personal tricks you’re not likely to learn anywhere else! Workshop participants will then be guided on an interactive photo walk with one of Impossible’s experienced staff photographers, exploring and capturing the richly photogenic cusp of SOHO, Chinatown and Little Italy. We’ll finally re-convene back at the space to discuss images, ask questions and talk about image preservation techniques.

WHEN: SUNDAY, MARCH 11, 2012, 10:00 AM to 1:00 PM
WHERE: Impossible Project Space: 425 Broadway, 5th Floor, Between Howard & Canal Streets
REGISTER: nycspace@theimpossibleproject.com or +1 212 219 3254
Please notify when registering if renting a camera at no extra cost!
FEE: US$ 50 (price includes 1 pack PX 680 Color Shade FF & Frog Tongue)

No. 311

Artist in Residence: MOMENTUM's Clay Lipsky

Jon Campolo, | Mar 2, 06:24 PM

Just last night, we celebrated the opening reception of MOMENTUM at The Impossible Project NYC Space. To commemorate the event, we’re excited to begin a new series to the Impossible Blog, Artist in Residence! Every so often, we’ll feature an artist currently showcased in an exhibition in the NYC Space, delving deeper into their interpretation of the theme of the show and how they went about making the images included. This installment features the dreamy filter techniques of Clay Lipsky, who was kind enough to explain his techniques and experiences with the new PX70 Color Shade:

“When the Impossible Project invited me to shoot my interpretation of  “Momentum” I thought of a place full of life & movement…the beach. Having spent most of my life in Florida and California, beach culture is very close to my heart. I was inspired to capture the sunny spirit and frenetic energy set amongst the iconic palm trees and sea gulls. Additionally I wanted to do it in a style reminiscent of the classic poster art from “The Endless Summer.” The latest incarnation of Impossible’s PX 70 Color Shade was very stable and provided consistent exposures, so I decided to push it by utilizing colored filters to tint my exposures and make my images as graphic as possible. A simple assortment of colored plastic squares placed in front of the lens (and light meter) gave me a kaleidoscope of hues to play with. The darker colored filters did prove problematic as they limited the amount of light significantly, but I found that this Color Shade film tended to overexposure so eventually I learned to push those images a little to counteract the loss of light. Meanwhile the lighter filters tended to overexpose, but the resulting lens flares and funky visual artifacts were welcome. In the end it took some experimentation and luck for things to come out right, but that was part of the fun. I also got some exercise from running around chasing seagulls!”

Special thanks to Clay for sharing – stay tuned for the next installment of Artist in Residence!

No. 284

ACE Hotel Shares the Love!

Jon Campolo, | Feb 2, 06:50 PM

Image by By Niki

Continuing our collaboration with ACE Hotels through an exhibition in NYC and our Limited Edition PX 600 Silver Shade UV+ film, ACE has been hosting an online photo contest, selecting new winners every month! ACE is collecting submissions of everyday and exalted Impossible images at an ever-evolving gallery located at acehotel.com/impossible. ACE’s ad hoc panel of romantics and analog enthusiasts will then co-curate a physical gallery show at Ace Hotel New York next fall, comprised of selected shots from this growing community gallery.

Congratulations to the most recent selected photographers of the ACE contest!

December 2011:
Andrea Buia, Judith Kyvik, Gregory Bencivego, Frederik Holmér and Morgane Santamarianova – enjoy your Pink Martini’s Joy To The World holiday record!

January 2012:
Weronika Gajda aka By Niki – enjoy your limited PX Gold Edition Set from Impossible!

Peruse the winners of the past two months here, then check out the growing collection and pick your favorites or submit your own for a chance to win!

No. 282

Announcing Instant Revolution @ The Impossible Project NYC Space!

Jon Campolo, | Feb 2, 12:33 AM

February 9 – March 23, 2012
6pm-9pm
The Impossible Project Space NYC
425 Broadway
5th Floor
New York NY 10013
Gary Baseman
  • James Franco
  • Maripol
  • Mary Ellen Mark
  • Jennifer Juniper Stratford

POLAROID and IMPOSSIBLE present
INSTANT REVOLUTION

To celebrate the collaboration between Polaroid and Impossible, The Impossible Project NYC Space will host a very special group exhibition dedicated to showcasing five of the world’s freshest contemporary photographers. For more than 60 years, the instant image has been a revolutionary aspect of how artists create, consider and define analog photography. The five artists featured in INSTANT REVOLUTION all take different approaches to illustrating their relationship with analog photography.

Featuring photos captured with the last original Polaroid Spectra film production run from 2008, one of the first products introduced as part of the Polaroid Classic line, five of the world’s most dynamic and contemporary artists have contributed to INSTANT REVOLUTION: Gary Baseman, James Franco, Maripol, Mary Ellen Mark and Jennifer Juniper Stratford. INSTANT REVOLUTION will be shown at The Impossible Project Space NYC from February 9 to March 23 2012 and on our official website. The Opening Reception will take place on February 9 from 6pm to 9pm, in the presence of the artists and with refreshments provided.

POLAROID and IMPOSSIBLE present
INSTANT REVOLUTION
at The Impossible Project Space NYC

February 9, 2012 – March 23, 2012

Opening Reception:
Thursday February 9, 2012. 6pm-9pm.

RSVP: rsvp@theimpossibleproject.com

Open to the public during open hours
Monday to Friday: 11am to 7pm
Saturday and Sunday: 12pm to 5pm

No. 277

Bi-annual Sample Sale @ The Impossible Project NYC Space!

Jon Campolo, | Jan 24, 03:00 PM

January 28th & 29th, 2012
12-5PM
The Impossible Project Space NYC
425 Broadway
5th Floor
New York NY 10013

The Impossible Project NYC Space will host it’s Bi-annual Sample Sale on January 28th and 29th, featuring all day bargains only available in store. On this very special weekend, analog enthusiasts are invited to dig through our boxes of seriously discounted Impossible stock! This includes 600 Cameras from $15, Spectra system cameras from $25, discounted film, rare accessories, limited edition prints, art books, and our famous Impossible Bruch film bags, including matured film mix 5 & 10 packs for 600, Image/Spectra and SX-70 cameras!

5 Pack (for $55!) & 10 Pack (for only $99!) Film Bundles of everyone’s favorite Impossible film types, including:

PX 600 ’06 TWIN PACKS
PX 600 UV+ (Japan edition)
PX 680 (manufactured 08/11)
PX70 PUSH! (manufactured 08/11)
PX 70 Triple Packs

If you’ve been waiting for an opportunity to visit the NYC Space now is the perfect time!

No. 273

Impossible No More…An Instant Workshop at Aperture!

Jon Campolo | Jan 19, 03:00 PM

Feb 4th, 2012
1-3:30pm
Aperture Tremont
2541 Scranton Rd.
Cleveland
OH 44113

As one of the few and privileged Impossible “Partner Store Plus” spaces in the USA, our friends at Aperture Tremont are hosting their first workshop ever, offering you an exclusive perspective on new Impossible films, tricks and tips.

During this hands-on workshop they’ll be covering techniques of working with Impossible film and vintage Polaroid cameras. The workshop will be ran by Aperture owner and photographer, Scott Meivogel, plus Cleveland Polaroid expert, Tim Logan. Tim shot for our One Hundred Impossible Portraits event last year, with fantastic results!

Finally, 1/3 of the workshop will be spent photographing two live models dressed in perfect vintage attire. Participants are guaranteed to leave with photographs that’ll knock their socks off, taken with the latest Impossible film! If you have your own Polaroid camera, please feel free to bring it. If not, they’ll have loaner cameras for you to use while you’re there.

Registration is $39.99 and includes a pack of Impossible film as well as refreshments. Registration can be completed by calling 216-574-8977, or purchasing on Aperture’s website HERE.

No. 271

Dr. Love's Tips – Mirror Mirror In My Camera...

Jon Campolo | Jan 17, 03:00 PM

The good doctor.

Another topic we got requests for was when the mirror in the camera gets stuck up out of place or mid cycle for one reason or another. This can often be recognized by a black VF and a camera that won’t close all the way.

There’s actually a couple tricks to getting your mirror back in place. If your camera is empty and you have an empty pack, you can try to put that in the camera and fire it a few times, or put the pack in, pull it out, back in, out a couple of times letting it cycle each time you close the door. This may get the camera back into the proper rhythm of things so that when you put a full pack in, everything is where it should be for proper operation to take pictures.

If this doesn’t work, or if the camera cycles but is still ‘off’, there is a more manual way to reset the mirror. Open your camera and look to the side of the camera behind the shutter button. You’ll see there’s a long strip of black plastic that runs the length of the camera next to the bellows. This plastic covers the drivetrain or gears to the camera that moves the power from the motor to the rollers and controlling the pick arm and mirror movement along the way as well.

To access the gears, you remove the plastic by pulling up from the front first, it will come up slightly in the front, then move a little further down and pull the rest up with a little ‘wiggle’ so as not to pull too much as to break it. Once the cover is off, you’ll see the series of gears. To reset your mirror, find the last gear towards the back of the camera that you can comfortably put your thumb on. Start winding the gear in the direction of least resistance. If you wind and after a few turns it suddenly has more resistance, wind the other direction. It could take about 30+ seconds to hand wind the mirror back in to place so be patient. Simply wind until you hear that usual ‘snap’ which is the sound of the picking arm resting, and what you hear when you normally take a picture. Once you hear this, look through the VF and you should see clearly though it, the camera should be able to close completely, and if you open the film door you should see the mirror on the top flat and flush with the top.

To put the black plastic cover back on, start at the back, and it should fit neatly back into place without forcing anything, and make sure nothing is outside the chrome or plastic outer body. This may take more than one try, but the main thing to remember is don’t force it.

Once the cover is back on, the camera should be able to close freely and completely, and you can again try the camera. If the VF is still black but the camera closes completely, be sure the top VF is fully extended for if it isn’t, the mirrors do not align properly to see an image. You can test the VF by pressing down on the top front and making sure it has a ‘springy’ response to your pressure. If the VF doesn’t spring back, you may need to put the spring back on the mirror as described in the cleaning and maintenance post.

If you still experience issues, your camera may need repair, but at least you now know how to reset the mirror so that you can close the camera and it can travel safely to a repair shop.

Keep your rollers clean, -f

No. 269

Viewfinder: Jorge Valle

Jon Campolo | Jan 15, 03:00 PM

Analog instant film has been an integral part of the fashion world for decades. For this installment of our “Viewfinder” series, our featured photographer Jorge Valle sheds light on how Impossible films can not only refresh a photographer’s attitude, but also help communicate a unique style in an industry so dominated by digital photography.

“I’m 29 and I live in Madrid, Spain, but I’m moving to London in a few months. I work as a graphic designer, but my big passion is photography. That’s the reason why I left my job in Madrid and moved to New York City, where I spent the last three months of 2011 taking some courses and workshops at the International Center of Photography. While I was in the Fashion Photography course I noticed that almost every picture was taken with digital cameras, and at that time I was a little bit tired of digital. I needed to make something different. So inspired by my teacher Andrea Blanch, who always wanted us to go further, I created for my last assignment a fashion editorial with pictures taken with Impossible Film. And the result was exactly what I wanted, something fresh, natural and with attitude. It’s funny how instant film is considered something refreshing now, when it was so common in the fashion industry not so long ago!

All the pictures were taken in Williamsburg, which is where I lived while I was in NYC. Coming from Europe, a borough like Brooklyn can be very inspiring and kind of “exotic”. It’s completely different (the people, the architecture…) compared to Madrid, and I’m sure most of the people here couldn’t even imagine that this is part of New York, since everyone has that picture in their mind of a city with the biggest skyscrapers. I love Williamsburg, and I think it’s an important part of this project, as well as the help of Álvaro, who was my “model” and fellow traveler!

I think that moment was a big step in my photography, because it made me appreciate every format as a unique way to tell something. I’ve worked with medium format and 35mm cameras a lot, but that was the first time I considered making a real project with Impossible film and I couldn’t be happier. I really loved the experience and I’m sure it’s going to be an important part of my work as a photographer in the near future.”

Thanks so much to Jorge for taking part in our “Viewfinder” series, and for sharing his experiences with us. To see more of Jorge’s work, visit his official website.

No. 266

Oskar Landi – Also in India Recap!

Jon Campolo, | Jan 14, 03:00 PM

This past Thursday, we were so grateful to celebrate the opening of Oskar Landi’s Also in India exhibition at the NYC Space! With his debut show at Impossible, Landi portrays the country through dry image transfers of original Type 679 Polaroid film, revealing imperfections and faint colors reminiscent of early photographic processes and hand coloring techniques. Attendees took in the many textures of India as portrayed by the artist and enjoyed delicious artisan chocolate from FINE & RAW!

Those wishing to see the exhibition may visit the Impossible NYC Space any time during store hours: Monday through Friday 11am–7pm and on Weekends 12pm–5pm until February 9th. Thanks so much (and congratulations!) to Oskar and everyone who attended!

No. 264

Viewfinder: Portroids

Jon Campolo | Jan 11, 09:53 PM

Jimmy Pardo

You’ll find Rick DeMint, founder of Portroids and his Spectra camera behind every red rope and at every press conference worth photographing. For this installment of our “Viewfinder” series, we take a look at only a few of the thousand (!) instant images he’s shot of inspiring personalities over the past decade.

“My name is Rick DeMint and for over 8 years I have been documenting my life and the people I’ve met by taking Polaroid portraits of them and having the photos autographed. I call them portroids and have collected almost 1,400 so far. From my home in Fort Collins, Colorado, I’ve been lucky enough to be able to travel to many places and I always make sure to have my Polaroid Spectra camera with me, plenty of film, and a Sharpie. I enjoy attending film festivals, comedy events, theater, and just seeing who I may meet by exploring various cities.

In association with the comedy podcast Never Not Funny, for the past two years I have taken portroids (Polaroid portraits) backstage at their 12 hour marathon podcast Pardcast-A-Thon. For this year’s event I exclusively used the Impossible Project PZ600 UV+ Silver Shade Black Frame film to take portraits of each of the guests, the hosts, and associated crew. The Pardcast-A-Thon is a fundraiser for the charity Smile Train, so I also auctioned off the original photos, made a poster for their studio wall, and created a book of the event to be sold to raise additional money for the charity.”

Special thanks for Rick for taking part in our “Viewfinder” series, and for making everyone look so darn good on Impossible film! To see more of Rick’s portroids, visit his Flickr or Facebook pages.

No. 261

Dr. Love's Tips – To Maintain or Not To Maintain

Jon Campolo | Jan 10, 06:49 PM

The good doctor.

We put out the question to you all about what kinds of tips you all would like to hear. One topic we heard several times was about cleaning and maintenance of your folding SX-70 and SLR 680 cameras.

There are a few simple things you can do to help keep your cameras running well and looking good. Now not to sound like a broken record, but I again cannot stress keeping your rollers clean. You can refer back to our Door swapping post about how to get the door off your camera to make cleaning easier and safer. Then you can go back to our first video with Dave about cleaning rollers for how to do this.

After that you can keep the inside of your camera clean with a can of compressed air or an air blower some of you may have for keeping lenses clean which can help keep dust out of the film compartment of the camera. Don’t forget that mirror you can see inside the camera is like another lens element because the image is reflected off that mirror to expose the film. A hair or smudge on this mirror may show up on your shots, and if there is a smudge, try cleaning it with a lens cloth taped to the end of something long and thin like a chopstick or handle of a dinner knife. Just be careful of the picking arm in the back left corner, and don’t apply too much upward pressure on the mirror.  

A lot of people have asked about cleaning bellows as well. Using Windex is actually a great tool for this. Apply to lens cloth or something lintless and soft, and here again, do not apply too much pressure and of course avoid anything pointy or sharp as you wipe it over the bellows to get them shiny and black again.

As to the lens you can clean like any other camera’s, same with the lens of the VF. Now if the VF mirror needs cleaning, you can lower the skirt of the VF by pressing up slightly at the center at the top of the front of the skirt whirr these two clips are that hold it there, then lower it allowing you access from the sides and do the lens cloth on a chopstick again, knife handle is likely too big. Be sure not to not the spring off, or if it is off simply put the hook back over the side of the mirror like in the included picture. To put skirt back into place simple raise the skirt back up and tuck the clips back under, and you can press the VF down as if to close it, and upon closing it should snap back in just as it was.

If you have a need for cleaning anything internally like the mirrors aside from the film compartment or the VF, we recommend sending it to a professional repair shop as the only way to access these is to take the camera apart. This most likely isn’t necessary, but for this we recommend PHOTOTECH here in NYC if you’re in the US.

Lastly, for general maintenance on the camera, the best thing for it is to be getting used with some regularity. If your camera hasn’t been picked up in a while, if it’s empty load an empty pack into it and fire off some ‘blanks’ to ‘warm it up’. If the camera isn’t responsive initially, refer to our SX-70 CPR post and make sure the battery in the pack is good. If your camera sounds whiny, this is often caused by carbon build up on the motor or the lubricant drying a bit, and firing the camera is the best way to get this worked out. Note however if the sound does not improve after a couple of days of periodical exercise for 5 minutes at a time a couple times during the day, or in fact worsens, the camera likely needs repair. If you already use your camera nearly daily, this shouldn’t be necessary and if anything you should try not to ‘overuse’ the camera, if you have more than one you can rotate them.

Hope this info helps and as always, keep your rollers clean, -f

No. 260

Brandon Long Exhibited @ Photobooth SF

Jon Campolo, | Jan 9, 11:04 PM

Photobooth, the world’s only Tintype and Polaroid portrait studio, exhibited our good friend and fellow Impossible photographer Brandon Long last Friday, January 6th, and Brandon has been kind enough to share a sneak peek of his SX-70 shots with those of us that couldn’t be in San Francisco!

See more of Brandon Long’s dreamy portraits on his flickr!

No. 256

Oskar Landi – Also in India

Jon Campolo, | Jan 2, 10:20 PM

January 12 - February 9, 2012
6–9pm
The Impossible Project Space NYC
425 Broadway
5th Floor
New York NY 10013

Amassing four separate worldwide journeys over the past decade, Oskar Landi translates multiple communities of India with a unique visual language, when discovery through spoken word was insufficient. Landi was born and raised in Italy and has lived and worked in New York since 1998. His personal projects have been recognized by the International Photo Awards and Prix de la Photographie Paris as well as numerous publications worldwide.

On Thursday, January 12th, Oskar Landi’s “Also in India” opens on the south wall at The Impossible Project Space NYC. With “Also in India,” Landi portrays the country through dry image transfers of original Type 679 Polaroid film, revealing imperfections and faint colors reminiscent of early photographic processes and hand coloring techniques. Conditions such as uncontrollable humidity, heat, dust and expired photographic chemicals caused unexpected but enchanting consequences even for the artist. The resulting exhibition is a visual introduction to the rich cultures of India dependent on Landi’s astounded curiosity.

Oskar Landi – Also in India
At The Impossible Project Space NYC
January 12, 2012 – February 9, 2012
Opening Reception: Thursday January 12, 2012, 6pm–9pm
RSVP: rsvp@theimpossibleproject.com

Open to the public during open hours M–F 11am–7pm and Weekends 12pm–5pm
The Impossible Project Space NYC, 425 Broadway, 5th Floor, NY, NY 10013
www.the-impossible-project.com

No. 236

NYC Space Advent Calendar Deals! (Week 3)

Jon Campolo | Dec 12, 03:00 PM

The Impossible Project NYC Space Advent Deals continue this week! Here are the details:

DAY 12: Buy 4 packs of PZ 680 and get a free set of impossible buttons
DAY 13: 2 double packs of flash bars for $30 (25% off)
DAY 14: Buy 4 packs of PX 70 and get a FREE pack of 5 Vintage SX-70 Christmas cards.
DAY 15: Buy 4 packs of any impossible film get a free frog tongue!
DAY 16: Buy 2 packs of PX 600 UV+ and get a free dry age kit!
DAY 17: Buy any camera and get a free camera case
DAY 18: Buy a spectra camera kit and a triple pack of pz 680 for $195 (24% discount)

Remember: these deals are available IN-STORE ONLY!

Also, don’t forget the NYC Space’s holiday hours:
Monday–Friday 11AM to 8PM
Saturday & Sunday 11AM to 6PM

Impossible Project NYC Space
425 Broadway, 5th Floor
New York, NY 10013

No. 235

Photogram Workshop with Patrick Winfield - Recap

Jon Campolo | Dec 11, 08:55 PM

This past Sunday, The Impossible Project celebrated the meticulous art of the Instant Photogram with Patrick Winfield ! Although mastering Patrick’s techniques proved to be quite challenging, workshop attendees worked diligently in the pitch dark to craft wonderfully surprising photograms of their favorite objects. After giving an inspiring history of the photogram, Patrick took the class through a series of integral steps in making photograms possible. Using jewelry, toys, cassette tapes, colored filters and many other assorted items, attendees took turns in a blacked-out NYC Space with only a pack of opened film, a flashlight and their newly acquired skills.

As you can see from our blog’s gallery, the results were fantastic! Thank you to all who participated and to Patrick Winfield of course! We hope he returns very soon to lead another workshop filled with more secret techniques.

Feel free to sign up for our weekly newsletter to always stay up to date on everything Impossible. Call 212-219-3254 or email nycspace@the-impossible-project.com for more info.

No. 230

Vanessa Sulzer's Summer Series.

Patrick Tobin, | Dec 8, 04:17 PM

Vanessa Sulzer is a photographer, yoga instructor and dog walker based in Jackson Hole, Wyoming. She recently contacted us with some beautiful summer photos she shot…

“I am in love with instant film. The instantaneousness of the process, the sound of the film as it spits out, the vintage quality of the color and even the mutations that can occur in development make taking polaroids dear to my heart. Also how each photograph is an object in and of itself makes taking pictures feel like more of a tangible experience. Because of my long time love affair with the film, when Polaroid announced that they were going to stop making the film, I went into what could be defined as an art crisis. It wasn’t until a friend of mine told me about the Impossible Project, that I was able to brighten up.

In honor of the medium, I am in the process of putting together 6 books of my Polaroid photographs that I have taken over the years. I decided to make the books themselves the size of a Polaroid, because that is one of my favorite things about it. The style of the photographs in the books vary from street photography, portraits, landscapes, but they all have that same special vintage look that I love about the film. Matter what the subject matter, I consider each photo a mini visual diary in itself, so I decided to simply categorize the books by places, people, animals, etc.

I shot this series with Impossible PX 680 film. I like the quality of light, and the experimental element of this new film adds just another layer of fun and serendipity to the process. This series is a small diary of summer fun in 2011 shot in my home town of Jackson Hole, Wyoming, Los Angeles, California and Denver, Colorado. Even though each photo is a mini visual diary in itself, I like the rhythm of how the images go together and the feeling of being a tourist that runs through this series. Also, even though I live in Jackson Hole, I like how even those pictures (all the ones with the mountains in the background) look like tourist photographs because of the sheer beauty of where I live.”

Special thanks to Vanessa for sharing her images! To contact Vanessa, you can email her at vsulzer26@hotmail.com

No. 225

Introducing The Impossible Project NYC Space Advent Calendar!

Patrick Tobin, | Dec 2, 12:18 AM

Analog Santa has stopped by New York early this year! Special deals are available every day until Christmas, exclusive to our New York Project Space. Every day has its own delightful deal. Stop by the NYC Space often to stock up for gifts for every film lover on your holiday list!

DAY 1 (Dec. 1) Buy 3 packs of PX 600 UV+ Gold Frame and get a 5-pack of vintage christmas cards.

DAY 2 (Dec. 2) Buy 5 packs of PX 600 UV+ Grey Frame, get 2 packs free.

DAY 3 (Dec. 3) Buy a Handmade Cigar Box Pinhole Camera, get a free pack of Polaroid Type 664.

DAY 4 (Dec. 4) Buy 2 packs of PX 680 FF and get a 5-pack of vintage christmas cards.

Stay tuned, because next Monday, we’ll let you know of more NYC Space deals coming your way!

No. 218

New Spectra Workshop at The Impossible Project Space NYC

Jon Campolo, | Nov 27, 05:38 PM

December 11th, 2011
10am - 1pm
The Impossible Project Space NYC
425 Broadway
5th Floor
New York NY 10013

By popular demand, The Impossible Project is pleased to announce the return of The Spectra Workshop at the New York Space.
On Sunday, December 11th, the Impossible NYC space will hold a three-hour interactive tutorial on getting the best out of the Polaroid Spectra camera and the Impossible film range.

This workshop is designed to explore the Spectra camera’s full potential and versatility, including an outline of all the camera’s unique accessories and attachments. We will cover in detail all that The Impossible Project film has to offer, including shielding techniques, temperature control and identifying and managing each film type’s unique characteristics.

Workshop participants will then have the opportunity to explore all the photogenic wonders of SOHO, Little Italy and Chinatown with two of Impossible’s experienced staff photographers and then re-convene back at the space to discuss images, ask questions and talk about image preservation techniques.

• When: Sunday, December 11th, 2011, 10am – 1pm
• Where: Impossible Project Space, 425 Broadway, Floor 5, NYC 10013
• Registration: (212) 219 3254 or nycspace@theimpossibleproject.com
Please notify when registering if renting a camera at no extra cost
• Fee: $50 (price includes 1 pack PZ 680 Color Shade & Frog Tongue)

No. 217

The Photogram Workshop with Patrick Winfield

Jon Campolo, | Nov 27, 05:37 PM

December 3rd, 2011
5 - 6:30pm

Impossible Project NYC Space
425 Broadway
5th Floor
New York NY 10013

On Saturday, December 3rd, from 5pm-6:30pm, artist Patrick Winfield will appear in person at The Impossible Project Space NYC to present a brief slideshow history of The Photogram. Then, using Impossible instant film material, he will demonstrate his own distinctive techniques to create photograms similar to the ones pictured here.

Attendees will be supplied with one pack of Impossible color film, a Polaroid 600 camera, flashlights, transparencies and colored gels. You’re welcome to bring your own photogram objects also! Each participant will get 10% off any store purchase the night of the class.

Don’t miss this very rare opportunity to be involved in an exclusive interactive class by one of the world’s leading instant artists!

WHEN: Saturday, December 3rd, 2011 – 5pm to 6:30pm

WHERE: Impossible Project Space NYC – 425 Broadway, 5th Floor

REGISTRATION: $95
RSVP/Questions: (212) 219-3254 or nycspace@theimpossibleproject.com

More Info About Patrick Winfield:
Patrick is a Brooklyn based artist whose work is about accidents and how these flaws become a form of perfection. “I may jam or manipulate the films to play up the surface, the tangibility of the film medium. I create a moment out of several various instances – a walking perspective controlled and pulled in by the structure of the grid, not an instant view, but a clustering of memories and visuals. Each photo is competing with the image as a whole, causing this movement of the eye as it takes in a single image then back to the whole.”
Patrick’s work has been featured in an array of arts and design magazines and blogs and you may have recently seen his work at Urban Outfitters – the result of a 2010 collaboration.

No. 216

When Impossible Took Chicago...

Patrick Tobin, | Nov 27, 05:00 PM

Last weekend, Impossible’s VP Dave Bias travelled to The Vintage Photo Shop at A&A Studios in Oak Park, IL, to give a camera and film demonstration and to answer questions about The Impossible Project. The event had a great turnout, with one lucky guy winning a Red Stripe 600 Camera and 4 packs of film, courtesy of The Vintage Photo Shop.

Vintage Photo Shop is part of 312photobooth, and we are very proud to have them working with us to lovingly restore vintage Polaroid photo booths (one of which will be in our NYC Space very soon!).

If any Chicagoans are in need of Impossible film, head over to The Vintage Photo Shop in Oak Park today!

No. 208

David Sankey - The Queerest Old Quaker

Patrick Tobin, | Nov 20, 04:00 PM

New York-based graphic designer and musician David Sankey recently released his first album under the name The Queerest Old Quaker. The album artwork features an image taken with Impossible’s PX 70 Color Shade film. We asked David to tell us a little about the album and his experience with Impossible film.

“The Queerest Old Quaker project and this first album are the result of several years of casual songwriting, but it wasn’t until early this summer that these songs began to develop a relationship to one another. I recorded most of the instrumentation in my bedroom here in New York and then had my sister, Rebekah Sankey, work out some harmonies. Her boyfriend, Vincent Castoro, recorded our vocals. They’re both incredible musicians. The result is a short collection of what I guess are folk-ish songs. It’s hard for me to get any objective perspective on it, but it felt natural coming out of me, like the kind of music I ought to be writing.

When it came to the album art, I had a very different image in mind that I was playing with for some time. It was a digital photo, heavily retouched, and in the end it wasn’t sitting well with me. I’m an illustrator and visual artist first, but I’m content creating things of all different kinds. Music, drawings, photography, etc. all feel like they come from the same place. I was scanning a couple of photos I had taken with an SX-70 Model 2 and PX 70 film, and something clicked and I started associating those kinds of images with the music. I found one I liked very much for the cover, and a close runner-up became the background of the website (http://TheQueerestOldQuaker.com). The warmth and understated quality of the film mirrored a sensibility I was hoping to capture in the songs. I’ve been shooting instant for only a few years; I got into it just before IMPOSSIBLE got started. Great timing for me! I couldn’t be happier with some of the pieces I’ve been able to produce.”

The Queerest Old Quaker was released on November 15th, 2011. Purchase your copy at www.thequeerestoldquaker.com.

No. 192

Chloe Aftel's Nude Models Workshop - Recap

Patrick Tobin, | Nov 7, 11:51 AM

This past Saturday morning, we were lucky enough to have the amazing and talented Chloe Aftel in the Impossible Project NYC Space. Chloe led a workshop on nude photography and taught a group session explaining the ins and outs of working with a model in an intimate setting. The small group of photographers learned how to talk with and pose a model to make them feel comfortable and get the best results from a nude photo shoot.

Chloe also walked the photographers through the process of using Impossible film, demonstrating how the film performs in different types of light. The photographers got the chance to work with two different nude models, shooting them in various locales throughout our NYC Space. Thanks to workshop atendees Richard Kacprowski, CJ Isaac, Robert Sweeney, Pete Plaia, Justin Higgins and Arturo Sanchez for the use of their instant images. All digital images by Kisha Bari.

This Thursday night from 6-9 pm, Chloe Aftel will be displaying a solo show, LIPS, shot on impossible project PUSH film. Click HERE for details.

No. 190

Back In Stock - Spectra Spectacular Kits!

Patrick Tobin, | Nov 5, 03:00 PM

That’s right! We now have the popular Spectra Spectacular Camera Kits back in stock in the US Online Shop. Each kit comes with a refurbished Spectra camera, 1 pack of PZ 680 Color Shade film and 1 pack of PZ 600 Silver Shade UV+ film.

First introduced in 1986, Spectra cameras offer a wider frame, so you can include more friends, puppies, motorcycles, or whatever you like to photograph in each frame. Spectra cameras also feature sonar autofocus, so you can get the sharpest image possible.

People have been going wild for PZ 680’s unique tonal range and colors. Get a kit for yourself and see what everyone is talking about!

No. 183

Impossible On Set - "Druid Peak"

Patrick Tobin, | Oct 30, 03:00 PM

In September, Impossible USA’s own Josie Keefe traveled to the Northwest to serve as Art Director for an independent film entitled Druid Peak. The film, about a troubled, rebellious teenager who is sent to live with his father following the accidental death of a friend, was shot on location in Teton Valley, Wyoming.

Assembled here is a selection of beautiful production photos Josie took using Polaroid Chocolate film and Impossible’s PZ 680 Color Shade film. The film captures beautifully the vast expanses and impressive scenery of the Northwest.

No. 174

Impossible Takes Atlanta.

Patrick Tobin, | Oct 19, 06:35 PM

This past weekend, the Atlanta area became an Impossible hotspot.

On Friday the 14th, in cooperation with Atlanta Celebrates Photography, Impossible’s VP Dave Bias gave a lecture at the Big Studio – King Plow Arts Center about the history of The Impossible Project thus far and the advancements that have been made in Impossible film over the past few years.

The following evening, Jennifer Schwartz Gallery hosted an opening reception for “Instant Gratification: From Polaroid To Impossible,” a new exhibition celebrating instant film’s resurgence. The exhibit features work by Mikael Kennedy, Sol Allen, Chloe Aftel, Grant Hamilton, John Reuter and more. Click HERE to see photos from the reception by Burnaway.org.

We’d also like to welcome The Camera Doctor of nearby Decatur, GA, to the family of Impossible Project dealers! The Camera Doctor will have film and accessories in stock within the next few weeks.

Both events had excellent turnouts. If you are in Atlanta, be sure to stop by Jennifer Schwartz Gallery to see the exhibition, which will be on display through November 26th. Special thanks to Jennifer Schwartz, Meghan Walter and Beau Torres of Jennifer Schwartz Gallery, Ryan Nabulsi of Burnaway.org and Amy Miller of Atlanta Celebrates Photography.

No. 173

John Reuter - The Creative History of Polaroid

Patrick Tobin, | Oct 18, 05:54 PM

Saturday, October 22nd; 2-4 PM
Wadsworth Atheneum
600 Main Street
Hartford
CT
United States
06103
Image by Rick Friedman

In 2009, 20×24 Holdings LLC took possession of the film inventory and production equipment required for large format 20×24 instant film from the Polaroid Corporation.

On Saturday, October 22nd, join 20×24’s Chief Executive Officer John Reuter at the Wadsworth Atheneum to explore the creative use of Polaroid photography since the late ‘70s by artists such as Robert Mapplethorpe and Patti Smith.

This lecture is supported through the Photography Department at the Hartford Art School, University of Hartford, in memory of M.I. Cake.

No. 167

The Impossible SX-70 Workshop

Patrick Tobin, | Oct 12, 06:39 PM

Sunday, October 30th, 10 AM-1 PM
Impossible Project Space NYC
425 Broadway
5th Floor
New York
NY 10013

The Impossible Workshop series is delighted to present the first of our SX-70 camera and film workshops on Sunday, October 30th from 10 AM to 1 PM. The iconic SX-70 camera has now become a rare vintage classic and is still arguably Polaroid’s sharpest and most innovative camera.

This fully interactive workshop will include use of a folding SX-70 (although we encourage you to bring your own), one pack of Impossible PX 70 film and a PX Shade. We will explore the features of the SX-70, and there will be a focus on shooting techniques and achieving the best results from the new Impossible films. We’ll cover topics ranging from shielding techniques to temperature control to identifying and managing each film type’s unique characteristics.

You will have the opportunity to shoot in and around our NYC space, located on the cusp of Soho, Little Italy and Chinatown, and then display and discuss your images before learning about image preservation techniques.

The workshop is priced at $50 and all students will also receive 10% off anything in the store on the day of the event! Hurry to book as limited places are available. To register for this workshop, please call us toll-free at 888-250-6020, 11am-7pm EST or email nycspace@theimpossibleproject.com.

No. 162

Great Minds: Steve Jobs and Edwin Land

Patrick Tobin, | Oct 6, 10:03 PM

Click image for full story of Edwin Land and Steve Jobs.

It’s hard not to see the parallels between the genius of both Steve Jobs, founder of Apple, and Dr. Edwin Land, the creator of Polaroid. Here at Impossible, our lives are touched every day by the technological gifts Dr. Land has given us, just as the world is touched every day by the devices given us by Apple. So upon hearing of the passing of Steve Jobs, another creative marvel of our times, it was only natural that comparisons between these two visionaries would once again come to mind.

Both Polaroid and Apple, through the leadership of Land and Jobs respectively, created technology and products that had never existed before. In the heyday of Polaroid, each product that was released blew the minds of the population, in much the same way that Apple products have.

In the 1980s, Steve Jobs and Apple’s then-CEO John Sculley traveled to Cambridge, MA, to visit with Dr. Land at his laboratory. Recalls Sculley, “Dr. Land was saying: ‘I could see what the Polaroid camera should be. It was just as real to me as if it was sitting in front of me before I had ever built one.’ And Steve said: ‘Yeah, that’s exactly the way I saw the Macintosh.’”

We will of course miss Mr. Jobs and the magic he brought to Apple, but for years to come, the world will continue to be impacted by Apple products in the same way that we in the instant film community continue to feel the presence of Dr. Land.

UPDATE: New York Magazine editor Chris Bonanos wrote an op-ed piece in the New York Times on October 7th about Land’s influence on Jobs, which can be read HERE

No. 161

The Spectra Show - Jessica Hibbard Elenstar

Patrick Tobin, | Oct 6, 06:37 PM

Friend of Impossible and extremely talented photographer Jessica Hibbard Elenstar is currently showing some of her most beautiful Impossible Project PZ 600 UV+, PZ 680 and Polaroid Softtone images as part of The Spectra Show, her first solo exhibit.

Says Jessica, “In the age of digital everything, many people ask why I choose to shoot film. I could go on forever, but I’ll try to answer briefly: I’m drawn to the beauty of vintage cameras, the warmth of film, and the uniquely imperfect nature of each image.”

“The Spectra Show” will be on display at the Frederick County Chamber of Commerce through October 28th, 2011.

No. 157

Outside The Lines - Opening Reception Recap

Patrick Tobin, | Oct 4, 12:17 AM

Last Thursday night, September 29th, marked the opening of our new exhibition at the NYC Impossible Project Space. Several of the submitting artists, including Rommel Pecson, Dustin Yager, Toby Hancock and Brandon Long were present, as were numerous friends and Impossible supporters. Check out our images taken that night, and be sure to stop by the gallery to see the exhibition if you’re in New York City!

No. 156

"Outside The Lines" - A New Exhibition @ NYC Space

Patrick Tobin, | Sep 30, 11:23 PM

When Impossible embarked on its mission to save analog instant photography from extinction, people worldwide thought they’d said farewell to their beloved film and cameras. Thinking “outside the lines,” using new, innovative solutions and materials, Impossible was able to successfully create new instant film.

The Impossible Project challenged 14 outstanding photographers to create images on PX 680 FF Color Shade film expressing their personal interpretation of the phrase, “Outside The Lines”.

The photographers include Adam Goldberg, John Reuter, Brandon Long, Dustin Yager, Chloe Aftel, Andrea Jenkins, Sol Allen, Max Wanger, Benjamin Shuster, Parker Fitzgerald, Rommel Pecson, Toby Hancock, Ritchard Ton and Leah Reich.

Their breathtaking results will be on display at the Impossible Project Space NYC from September 29th, 2011 through January 31st, 2012 at the Impossible Project Space NYC – 425 Broadway, 5th Floor

No. 145

Bruce Soyez-Bernard - Ensembles @ NYC Space

Jon Campolo, | Sep 13, 09:37 PM

September 15, 2011
6–9PM
Impossible Project NYC Space
425 Broadway
5th Floor
New York NY 10013

Continuing the series of Impossible Art Works featured on the South Wall at the New York City Impossible Project Space, we are proud to present French born photographer Bruce Soyez-Bernard and his latest work, entitled “Ensemble #1, #2, #3, #4.”

Currently based in New York, Bruce began as a photojournalist in Africa for two years before transitioning into Beauty and Fashion photography in Paris and New York for prestigious clients such as Harper’s Bazaar, Cosmopolitan and Schwarzkopf.

These four composite pieces, called “Ensemble,” are a continuation of Soyez-Bernard’s photographic work on the body. Finding inspiration in shapes, skin texture, color and light. Taking several images with different crops and levels, the frames are then re-united, the body put back together, or part of the body, as a final collage.

While using The Impossible Project’s film range, Bruce pursues this process with a focus on the film grain, format and the “happy accidents” of this specific instant medium to create impressive life-size abstract pieces.

Please come celebrate this stunning new work – on view in the NYC Project Space through October 14, 2011, with an opening reception on September 15, 2011.
WHEN: Thursday, September 15, 2011 – 6:00pm to 9:00pm

WHERE: Impossible Project Space NYC – 425 Broadway, 5th Floor
RSVP/Questions: (212) 219-3254 or nycspace@theimpossibleproject.com

No. 143

Instant Forever: The Ace Hotel Film Edition

Patrick Tobin, | Sep 9, 10:16 PM

This month, Impossible will partner with Ace Hotel to keep the visceral art of instant analog photography alive for today’s romantics. Every guest room at Ace Hotel New
York will be stocked with a refurbished Polaroid camera and limited edition, custom packs of “Impossible x Ace Hotel” PX 600 Silver Shade instant black & white film in
the mini–bar.

To launch this collaboration, a gallery show called “24 hours at the Ace” will be on view beginning September 12 and going through October 14, featuring works by friends of Ace Hotel and The Impossible Project including Adam Goldberg, Chloe Aftel, Elijah Wood, Pat Sansone and Steve Olson, to name a few.

Sharing a common desire to continue, and yet re-invent, the shared experiences we all hold dear, Ace Hotel and The Impossible Project have teamed up for this unique analog film edition and exhibition.

GET LIMITED EDITION FILM HERE >

No. 132

The Impossible Workshop Series – Spectra!

Jon Campolo, | Aug 5, 06:43 PM

August 21, 2011
10AM–1PM
Impossible Project NYC Space
425 Broadway
5th Floor
New York NY 10013

Impossible America is pleased to present the next exciting workshop in our New York Space series.

Sunday August 21st, The Impossible NYC space will hold a 3 hour interactive tutorial on getting the best out of your Polaroid Spectra or 1200 type camera and getting the most out of all the Impossible film range.

After briefly exploring your Spectra camera’s full potential and versatility including unique accessories and attachments, we will then outline all that our new instant film has to offer. From shielding techniques to temperature control to identifying and managing each film types unique characteristics.

We’ll let you loose in the city streets to explore all the photogenic wonders of SOHO, Little Italy and Chinatown with two of our experienced photographers and then re convene back at the space to discuss your images, ask questions and talk about image preservation techniques.

Cost for the workshop is $75. Register today! Call (212) 219-3254 to RSVP or with questions; all major credit cards accepted.

No. 107

600 Workshop @ Impossible NYC Space

Jon Campolo, | Jul 2, 10:20 PM

July 10 & 17, 2011
10AM - 1PM
Impossible NYC Space
425 Broadway
5th Floor
New York NY 10013

  • JULY 10 WORKSHOP FULL! EXTRA DATE ADDED ON SUNDAY JULY 17TH.

On Sunday July 10th, The Impossible NYC Space will hold a 3 hour interactive workshop on getting the best out of your Polaroid 600 camera and the most out of all the Impossible 600 films.

After briefly exploring your 600 camera’s full potential and versatility, we will then outline all that our new instant film has to offer – From shielding techniques to temperature control to identifying and managing each film’s unique characteristics.

We’ll let you loose in the city streets to explore all the photogenic wonders of SOHO, Little Italy and Chinatown with two of our experienced photographers and then re convene back at the space to discuss your images, ask questions and talk about image preservation techniques.

Time: 10:00am to 1:00pm
Special Introductory Price: $50 (includes one free pack of PX680 film and free use of a Polaroid camera)
Call the NYC Space to make your reservation today at (212) 219–3254

No. 84

The Next Movement + Impossible!

Josie Keefe, | May 5, 11:13 PM

May 6 2011
5 & 6 Art Space
Scottsdale
AZ

The Next Movement is a unique collaborative project between The Impossible Project, Sol Exposure – an official photographer for The Roots – and Dumperfoo, a community leader in the live art scene in Arizona. The pieces incorporate Sol’s Impossible photographs enlarged and printed on canvas and Dumperfoo’s paint directly applied to the images.

Sol and Dumperfoo have been working around the clock this week with preparation for the gallery opening, including transforming the 5 & 6 Art Space into a gigantic mural.

The soft opening will be Thursday, May 5 and the official opening (complete with DJs Darrell D and Skip Skoolnik spinning exclusive Roots sets!) will be on Friday, May 6 at the 5 & 6 Art Space in Scottsdale, AZ.

No. 56

President's Day Sales All Week!

Jon Campolo, | Feb 22, 12:03 AM

To celebrate our country’s forefathers, we at the Impossible NYC Space are hosting sales all week long! We’ll be announcing the sales every morning, and announce each sale on our Facebook and Twitter pages. Sales will then be catalogued here:

Monday, Feb. 21 – PZ600 UV+ for $20/pack
Tuesday, Feb. 22 – 10% off all in-stock Polaroid cameras
Wednesday, Feb. 23 – Type 100 Chocolate film $15/pack
Thursday, Feb. 24 – Polaroid Spectra/Image film $20/pack
Friday, Feb. 25 – 15% off all books, bags and accessories

If you are in NYC, visit our 425 Broadway space – or call us anywhere in the US @ 888-250-6020. Be sure to follow both our Facebook and Twitter accounts closely, to fulfill all your instant analogue needs at a discounted price!

No. 26

A Flash of Color!

Jon Campolo, | Nov 12, 10:51 AM

Our new PX70 PUSH! film needs a LOT of light to soak in all those wonderful colors you want to capture. Recently, the Impossible team has been testing PUSH! with flash bars and the colors are looking brilliant.

From left to right:
Exposure wheel untouched, exposure wheel 1 click towards white, and exposure wheel ALL THE WAY white.

Try getting up close and personal, and with a flash bar, shed some light on a colorful situation!