June 2011

9
No. 98

The Revival of Instant Film

Frank Love | 1793 days ago

A film team of Digifoto Pro recently visited the Impossible Factory in Enschede (NL) to create a fantastic film about “The Revival of Instant Film”

Follow director Maurits Reijnoudt into the Impossible Universe – Watch Here!

14
No. 99

Travelling with Impossible Films

Frank Love | 1788 days ago

Summer is near, and so are – if you’re lucky – holidays and travels. Don’t forget to pack your Polaroid cameras as well as a few Impossible films!

Watch or re-watch this video with Doctor Franck to learn how to properly store your film before departure and how to safely travel with film without risking xray damage to your film.

15
No. 100

The 365 Project

Frank Love, | 1787 days ago

Nate is currently working on THE 365 PROJECT – a photo a day project for 2011, using nothing but new films created for Polaroid camera’s by Impossible.

He is now quickly approaching 6 months of shooting every day with Impossible’s film – follow his Impossible Life HERE

16
No. 101

Special Edition "Impossible Rainbow" prints available

Josie Keefe, | 1786 days ago

Just arrived in our New York store – a special edition batch of 10 beautiful “Impossible Rainbow” prints available for sale! A treat for any Polaroid devotee, these exclusive prints fit perfectly in a 50cm x 70cm frame and are for sale for just $75. The prints were specially made for the Impossible Project by the talented Mark Griffiths, an artist and lifelong Polaroid enthusiast.

This exclusive deal is available at our NYC Space. Stop by or call our New York Space (212.219.3254) to grab one before they are gone.

Mark will be giving away one of these prints to a lucky winner. Visit his blog to enter the giveaway. Mark will randomly chose a winner from the comments on the site. Enter before June 24th for a chance to win one of these lovely prints!

More of Mark’s art is available for sale on his etsy store.

20
No. 102

Impossible Pop Up Store Vienna

Sarah Jungreithmayr, | 1782 days ago

On the occasion of POLAROID [IM]POSSIBLE we packed our moving boxes and transferred our Impossible Project Space Vienna to a Pop Up Shop location for the duration of the exhibition. Right next to WestLicht, we’re now turning the venue into the most analog instant hotspot of Vienna.

IMPOSSIBLE POP UP SHOP
JUNE, 17th – AUGUST 21st
Westbahnstraße 38
1070 Vienna, Austria

Mon, Tue, Wed, Fri: 12:00 – 19:00
Thu: 14:00 – 21:00
Sat: 11:00 – 19:00

vienna@the-impossible-project.com
The Impossible Project Space in Breite Gasse will be closed during this time.

24
No. 103

HOW TO USE PX 70 COLOR SHADE

Frank Love, | 1778 days ago

Truth be told, the speed (light sensitivity) of this film is not totally where we expected it to be for the average SX 70 camera, and especially in bright summer light, the tendency for overexposed images is high. So please make sure to adjust the lighten/darken wheel of your SX 70 camera to the darkest setting. With a little experimentation, you will find the right darken setting for your camera.

This slightly high film speed will yield simply amazing color and tones in your correctly exposed SX 70 pictures, but it also opens up the amazing possibility to use this magic material in your 600 camera without the need of any additional filters! Simply insert the film in your Polaroid 600 camera, if necessary, add a little lighten adjustment and surround yourself with colors!

26
No. 104

From Polaroid To Impossible

Patrick Tobin, | 1776 days ago

We are pleased to announce the release of the new book chronicling the history and evolution of the instant photograph, “From Polaroid To Impossible.”

Published in conjunction with the POLAROID (IM)POSSIBLE exhibition, this gorgeous 200-page book, printed by acclaimed German publisher Hatje Cantz, brings together instant masterpieces from legends such as Ansel Adams and Andy Warhol to current artists like David Levinthal, EJ Camp and Mary Ellen Mark. The book also contains introductory essays by Barbara Hitchcock, Achim Heine and Florian Kaps.

“From Polaroid To Impossible” is available in our online shop, and we currently have nine copies for sale at $51.90 USD at the NYC Impossible Project Space.

30
No. 105

Perfect your PX 680 Color Shade FF Images!

Frank Love | 1772 days ago

The more we shoot PX 680 Color Shade FF film the more we love it and our images are getting better and better. We’ve assembled some of our best tips and tricks and hope you find them useful!

• Warming your print for one to two minutes during development helps to bring out better tones and contrast. You can stick the print under your arm or on a warm surface. Be careful not to overheat your images or they’ll end up yellowed.

• To avoid green excess chemicals leaking into image from pods, cut pods on back to air dry. Place the images in a plastic bag, seal tightly and store upright in fridge.

• If you’re shooting PX680ff in a SX 70 using a ND filter and getting less than colorful images try removing the filter and turning your L/D wheel all the way to darken. This works well indoors and on more overcast days. Please keep in mind that all SX 70s are different and this may not work for everyone.

• If you’re shooting on hot days and your camera gets warm your photos will tend to have an orange/pink hue, on cooler days or in an air conditioned space the colors will be much more true to life.

and of course…

ALWAYS SHIELD YOUR IMAGES FROM LIGHT FOR THE FIRST MINUTE!

Frank Love has carefully analyzed the best way to work with high-contrast scenes and has this to say:

“When shooting high-contrast scenes, you can change the focus of your shot using exposure. You can set your camera to under or over expose the shot to better define what your focus is. Whether you want to see the person sitting in the shadows, or keep your background reigned in, here you can see how adjusting your L/D wheel changes the shot.”

No. 106

Trick out your PX 680 Color Shade FF

Frank Love | 1772 days ago

Patrick Tobin created a nifty technique called a “controlled flash/burn.” He explains how to use it below:

With PX 680, because it takes longer to develop, it is possible to perform controlled flashes/burns on your image during the first few minutes of development. If you would like to “burn” text or shapes onto your photos, you can do the following.

1. Cut the words/shapes out of a piece of construction paper or darkslide, stencil-style, with siccors or an exact knife.

2. Have it at-the-ready for when making an exposure. When the print ejects from the camera, keep it shielded with the darkslide.

3. Quickly, take the print, covered by the darkslide, to a bright light source, preferably a window that gets a lot of sunlight.

4. Lay your stencil over the print and darkslide, lining up exactly where you’d like your burn to show up on your image, and slide the darkslide out from between the stencil and the print, allowing sunlight to leak onto your image in the shape you have cut.
The faster you do all of the above, the better. The print is uber light sensitive for the first minute or so especially. Also, it is a good idea to leave some dark space on your print where you’d like to leave your burn, so that the words/shapes stand out. As you can tell, some planning goes into this process, but it is fun to do.

No. 106

Trick out your PX 680 Color Shade FF

Frank Love | 1772 days ago

Patrick Tobin created a nifty technique called a “controlled flash/burn.” He explains how to use it below:

With PX 680, because it takes longer to develop, it is possible to perform controlled flashes/burns on your image during the first few minutes of development. If you would like to “burn” text or shapes onto your photos, you can do the following.

1. Cut the words/shapes out of a piece of construction paper or darkslide, stencil-style, with siccors or an exact knife.

2. Have it at-the-ready for when making an exposure. When the print ejects from the camera, keep it shielded with the darkslide.

3. Quickly, take the print, covered by the darkslide, to a bright light source, preferably a window that gets a lot of sunlight.

4. Lay your stencil over the print and darkslide, lining up exactly where you’d like your burn to show up on your image, and slide the darkslide out from between the stencil and the print, allowing sunlight to leak onto your image in the shape you have cut.
The faster you do all of the above, the better. The print is uber light sensitive for the first minute or so especially. Also, it is a good idea to leave some dark space on your print where you’d like to leave your burn, so that the words/shapes stand out. As you can tell, some planning goes into this process, but it is fun to do.

No. 105

Perfect your PX 680 Color Shade FF Images!

Frank Love | 1772 days ago

The more we shoot PX 680 Color Shade FF film the more we love it and our images are getting better and better. We’ve assembled some of our best tips and tricks and hope you find them useful!

• Warming your print for one to two minutes during development helps to bring out better tones and contrast. You can stick the print under your arm or on a warm surface. Be careful not to overheat your images or they’ll end up yellowed.

• To avoid green excess chemicals leaking into image from pods, cut pods on back to air dry. Place the images in a plastic bag, seal tightly and store upright in fridge.

• If you’re shooting PX680ff in a SX 70 using a ND filter and getting less than colorful images try removing the filter and turning your L/D wheel all the way to darken. This works well indoors and on more overcast days. Please keep in mind that all SX 70s are different and this may not work for everyone.

• If you’re shooting on hot days and your camera gets warm your photos will tend to have an orange/pink hue, on cooler days or in an air conditioned space the colors will be much more true to life.

and of course…

ALWAYS SHIELD YOUR IMAGES FROM LIGHT FOR THE FIRST MINUTE!

Frank Love has carefully analyzed the best way to work with high-contrast scenes and has this to say:

“When shooting high-contrast scenes, you can change the focus of your shot using exposure. You can set your camera to under or over expose the shot to better define what your focus is. Whether you want to see the person sitting in the shadows, or keep your background reigned in, here you can see how adjusting your L/D wheel changes the shot.”

No. 103

HOW TO USE PX 70 COLOR SHADE

Frank Love, | 1778 days ago

Truth be told, the speed (light sensitivity) of this film is not totally where we expected it to be for the average SX 70 camera, and especially in bright summer light, the tendency for overexposed images is high. So please make sure to adjust the lighten/darken wheel of your SX 70 camera to the darkest setting. With a little experimentation, you will find the right darken setting for your camera.

This slightly high film speed will yield simply amazing color and tones in your correctly exposed SX 70 pictures, but it also opens up the amazing possibility to use this magic material in your 600 camera without the need of any additional filters! Simply insert the film in your Polaroid 600 camera, if necessary, add a little lighten adjustment and surround yourself with colors!

No. 99

Travelling with Impossible Films

Frank Love | 1788 days ago

Summer is near, and so are – if you’re lucky – holidays and travels. Don’t forget to pack your Polaroid cameras as well as a few Impossible films!

Watch or re-watch this video with Doctor Franck to learn how to properly store your film before departure and how to safely travel with film without risking xray damage to your film.